Help Davao: SurfAid International early results from CLTS in Nias, Indonesia
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Help Davao: SurfAid International early results from CLTS in Nias, Indonesia

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This review is focused on ‘water and health’ and seeks to share lessons learnt from the Western Sumatra Islands, Indonesia where communities are leading the eradication of open defecation through......

This review is focused on ‘water and health’ and seeks to share lessons learnt from the Western Sumatra Islands, Indonesia where communities are leading the eradication of open defecation through an approach known as Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS). With the apparent increasing frequency and intensity of hydro-hazards, hydrological ex-tremes and water-related disasters being witness in the Philippines the presentation will demonstrate that these approaches enable communities to increase resilience and to bet-ter self manage sanitation in the event of natural disasters. The paper will also expand upon how SurfAid International is piloting this approach in the early recovery processes in the aftermath of the M7.6 September 30th West Sumatra Earthquake. The paper will out-line the links between CLTS and how it can positively impact on conflict mitigation and community participation in the management of water resources. The paper is geared at the development practitioners who aim is to improve human lives. It is line with MGD 7. The paper is also useful to other land and water managers as the prescribed process of CLTS is focused on the reduction of bacterial contaminate from diffused point sources through the reduction of open defecation. Lessons from the paper also can also be employed by hazard managers to help better prepare communities to be able to self manage sanitation in emergency responses.

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  • In all my time work in Davao I always worked in the clean side of water, working to maintain quality and diversity, however since going to Indonesia I have gone to the dart side. To look at what we dump into water rather than take out. Sanitation. A cirital use, and one that we all use just about everyday.
  • So what?
  • Today we will share lessons from W sumatra
  • SurfAid are the main proponent behind joining HELP Network
  • We have only been truly implementing CLTS for less than a year, but it is being observes as one of our most powerful and empowering com-munity based approaches.
  • Working in remote location SAI provide innovative health tools to unleash NLs to provoke social movements that save lives at scale
  • Sanitation is the collection, transport, treatment and disposal or reuse of human excreta, domestic wastewater and solid waste, and associated hygiene promotion. the international aid system is overlooking diarrhoea, the second biggest killer of under fives after Acute Respiratory Infections.
  • According to the CLTS handbook “Triggering is based on stimulating a collective sense of disgust and shame among community members as they confront the crude fact about mass open defecation and its negative impacts on the entire community.” Through repeated field triggering SurfAid has learnt that the key success of triggering lays on a series activity that use PRA approaches and are designed to trigger specific feelings, such as pride, shame, disgust, safety and comfort, worry to get sick. When activities move from one to another, the feelings are also built till it reaches the ‘triggering momentum’ where community has to make a choice to deal with a problem and take action or not.
  • We have distilled five critical step that can be adapted to every health module rolled out to communities tackling a full range of health issues and unleash NLs to provoke social movements that save lives at scale. Every step Zero subsidy and community led, now that’s high level leverage!
  • According to the CLTS handbook “Triggering is based on stimulating a collective sense of disgust and shame among community members as they confront the crude fact about mass open defecation and its negative impacts on the entire community.” Through repeated field triggering SurfAid has learnt that the key success of triggering lays on a series activity that use PRA approaches and are designed to trigger specific feelings, such as pride, shame, disgust, safety and comfort, worry to get sick. When activities move from one to another, the feelings are also built till it reaches the ‘triggering momentum’ where community has to make a choice to deal with a problem and take action or not.
  • Go to more than one site Push the community to go all the way Mark the site with a bright flag Take photos to highlight your interest
  • Aug 2007 We also had another 7 built in Sirombu, but the follow up was to too week to expect anything like ODF. Teamwork, dedicated facilitation, NLs and intensive follow up are listed in the top five drives in spreading of CLTS

Transcript

  • 1. CLTS Early Lessons from The Western Sumatran Islands MULTI-USES OF RIVER BASINS:Tools to Harmonize Conflicting Interests, Davao City November 2009
  • 2. Did you know
    • Just one gram of human faeces can contain 10,000 viruses
    • Open defecation means that deadly diseases are quickly spread through a community
    • Water can become contaminated and a vector for diseases
  • 3. Who suffers?
    • Children are often exposes to faeces in areas that they play
    • Many children miss school because of illness
    • But…
    • There are thousands of communities making their villages free from defecation
  • 4. How?
  • 5. CLTS Community Led Total Sanitation
  • 6. Summary
    • IHP, Water & Health, sanitation
    • CLTS a low cost tool
    • Reflection on process and impacts from West Sumatra Islands
    • Conclusions & recommendations
  • 7. Water and health
    • IHP VII Sanitation tackled under Section 4: Water and life support systems
    • this theme includes protecting water quality from natural and anthropogenic sources of contamination.
    • Here we will view if from a human health perspective
  • 8. Sanitation: A high impact intervention
    • Bang for buck
    • Reduces human suffering
    • Improves environmental quality
    • Estimated the annual economic loss caused by poor sanitation is P77.8 billion.
  • 9. West Sumatra Islands Basin
    • Joined the HELP UNESCO River Basin Network thorough the third call in 2008
    • The Basin is at early stage in development
    • Stakeholder participation is ongoing at the village and local government levels
    • Strives to become a leader in the global network with a focus on water and health.
  • 10. West Sumatra Islands
    • maps
  • 11.  
  • 12. SurfAid International
    • Vision is to improve the health, well-being and self-reliance of people living in isolated regions.
    • Mission is to develop and synthesize a series of proven, high impact and cost effective approaches that create lasting improvements in the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities at increasing scale.
    • CLTS is one such approach.
  • 13. CL TS
  • 14. Community Led not SurfAid led! We only provide tools and provoke! Individuals who volunteer their time from the community – Natural Leaders
  • 15. Total Sanitation Is only achieved once the burned of sanitation related diseases are minimised. Diarrhoea is the single biggest disease burden from poor sanitation [ODF, Diarrhoea, waster water, composting]
  • 16. Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS)
    • is an innovative methodology where communities are facilitated to conduct their own appraisal and analysis of open defecation (OD)
    • Decide to take their own action to become ODF (open defecation free).
  • 17. Behavior not hardware
    • Traditional approaches mainly subsidy driven
    • Providing toilets does not guarantee their use,
    • Creates a culture of dependence on subsidies.
    • Open defecation and the cycle of fecal–oral contamination continued to spread disease.
  • 18. Diarrhea prevalence v’s latrine usage
  • 19. History
    • CLTS was pioneered by Kamal Kar in Bangladesh, in 2000.
    • WB, Plan International, WaterAid and UNICEF have become important disseminators and champions of CLTS.
    • Today CLTS is in more than 20 countries in Asia , Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.
    • No reference of CLTS being implemented in the Philippines.
  • 20. MDGs Seriously off track
  • 21. 20 million people do not have access to improved sanitation. Economic Impacts of Sanitation in the Philippines, WB An approach that works: CLTS Lessons from Sumatra
  • 22. Sumatran Islands Context
    • Funded by Oydimar Network with NZAID and AusAID.
    • Post earthquake reconstruction environment
    • Committed delivery of 64 improved water and sanitation facilities. (21 latrines)
    • HELP UNESCO partner for technical learning
  • 23. CLTS PROCESS As refined by team SAI
  • 24. 5 major steps
    • Prepare
    • Trigger
    • Action Planning
    • Tracking
    • Sustaining
  • 25. Step 1. Prepare
  • 26. Outside In (Before Day 1)
    • Training on 5 steps process.
    • CLTS is build on feelings so technical know how is not enough!
    • You have to build a cultural in your field team to ‘feel and live the process”
    Outcomes behaviours actions barriers Causes
  • 27. Step 2 Triggering “ Triggering is based on stimulating a collective sense of disgust and shame among community members as they confront the crude fact about mass open defecation and its negative impacts on the entire community.”
  • 28. Team Huddle And action
  • 29.  
  • 30. Step 2. Ice breaker
  • 31.  
  • 32. Step 3. Discussion Who actually has a latrine here?
  • 33. Step 4. Mapping
  • 34. Step 4. Mapping
  • 35.  
  • 36. Step 5. Walk of Shame
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39.  
  • 40.  
  • 41. Step 6. Discussion Amount of defeaction the village can produce Observe! Who is really engaged!? Who is contributing!?
  • 42.  
  • 43.  
  • 44. Step 7. Clean water drink And then not so clean…
  • 45.  
  • 46.  
  • 47.  
  • 48.  
  • 49.  
  • 50.  
  • 51.  
  • 52. First person to decide & act…
  • 53. Village commitments
  • 54. Results to Date CLTS
    • Is possibly the most powerful experience of community led development SurfAid has touched!
    • program had funds to build 21 latrines
    • 8 communities have built 191 units over a four month period
    • Zero subsidy!
  • 55. Latrine built
  • 56.  
  • 57.  
  • 58.  
  • 59.  
  • 60.  
  • 61.  
  • 62. Human impact
  • 63. Challenges
    • Maintaining health improvements
    • with wide scale community construction of basic pit latrines across the villages the potential risk of ground water contamination is high
  • 64. Pig pen
  • 65. Pig pen
  • 66. Pig pen 3
  • 67. Pig pen4
  • 68. Conclusion and Recommendations
  • 69. Conclusion
    • CLTS is an effective low cost solution to reduce anthropogenic sources of contamination and thereby reducing pressure on water and human health
    • True community empowerment approaches suffer in dole-out environments
      • If you are willing to tap the social entrepreneurial spirit in communities they can find solutions from within and
      • overcome dependences on dole out aid.
  • 70. Recommendations
    • 1. CLTS for adoption by other HELP Basins
    • 2. Develop a focus group on water, health and risk reduction to refine lessons across HELP
    • 3. to host technical cross visits to share experiences and engage technical reviews of water & health community programs
  • 71.  
  • 72.  
  • 73.  
  • 74. Questions?