0
With Résumé Development
1st Step Toward Your Career
Two
Locations
One Great
College
Developing Your Résumé
A workshop series brought to you by
Trinidad State Junior College
CTE Career Services
Overview of Sections
• The Objective Statement
• Qualification Highlights/Profile
• Contact Information/Résumé Heading
• E...
The Objective Statement
What is an objective
statement?
• A short section (usually 1-3 lines), often in
the form of a sentence fragment, immediate...
Why write one?
• Emphasize key qualifications, skills and/or
goals
• Help your readers find what they need to
know quickly...
Q: Is this a good objective
statement?
• Well-written but raises too many questions
• For example: What kind of internship...
A good objective statement
answers questions
• What position(s) are you applying for?
• What are your main qualifications?...
The importance of tailoring
• Sometimes one size does NOT fit all
• Each person and employer is unique in
certain ways
• A...
Getting started...
Reflect on your overall qualifications and
career goals: In what ways are they typical?
Unique?
Researc...
Questions about you
• What are your main qualifications, strengths,
skills, and areas of expertise?
• What position(s)--or...
Questions about employers
• What qualifications are most desired by
employers in your field?
• What positions are availabl...
“Instant” objective statements
• For practice, fill in the parts in brackets
– To utilize my [qualifications, strengths, o...
Which of your objective
statements is “best”?
• The one that best…
– Emphasizes your qualifications and/or goals
– Appeals...
Examples of what my objective
should sound like
Different types of objectives:
• Specific and open; not limiting.
• Exampl...
Career Objectives
• Objectives should reflect the employer's perspective,
not yours, and should tell what you can contribu...
Specific Career Objectives
JOB DESCRIPTION
POSITION: FRONT DESK RECEPTIONIST
MUST: BE AT LEAST 18YEARS OF AGE AND ABLE TO ...
Specific Career Objectives
• Take the skills and capabilities that they are
looking for in an employee
SKILLS: RECEPTIONIS...
Specific Career Objectives
• State the skills that you have and the skills that
the employers are looking for and write th...
Specific Career Objectives
Different types of objectives:
• Specific to position
• Objective: To utilize my knowledge as a...
Qualification Highlights,
Career Summaries, or
Profiles
Qualification Highlights, Career
Summary, or Profile Section
• Objectives may help sharpen the focus of your résumé,
espec...
Qualification Highlights, Career
Summary, or Profile Section
• The goal is to summarize your experience and
perhaps highli...
Qualification Highlights, Career
Summary, or Profile Section
• You may replace the objective with a
Qualification Highligh...
Qualification Highlights
Section
QUALIFICATION HIGHLIGHTS
• Bachelor of Science in Psychology
• Excellent communication, l...
Career Summary
• Strongly motivated graduate with experience in
hospital, sub-acute and other health care settings.
• Clin...
Career Summary or Profile
Apartment Manager
PROFESSIONAL PROFILE
• Highly motivated, dynamic and energetic with over 30
co...
The Contact Information
Section – Résumé Heading
What is a contact information
section – Résumé Heading?
• Easy answer…
• A section that
– Provides information to help pro...
What may you include?
• First and Last Name, of course! (M. Initial
recommended)
• Address (complete mailing address with ...
Q: Is this a good sample?
Your Name Here
1234 Streetname, #1
Trinidad, CO 81082
Student@cccs.student.edu
719-846-####
Moving beyond the typewriter
 Use design strategies
 Picking fonts
 Size
 Type
 Highlighting
 Using layout
 Alignme...
Using fonts
• Size: how big is big enough?Too big?
• Two major kinds:
– Serif
– Sans serif
• Text highlighting: bold, ital...
Using fonts
Below are some common fonts styles and sizes.
Serif and Sans-serif Fonts
• By manipulating the fonts used in your résumé, you can easily create a
hierarchy of informati...
• Serif fonts tend to keep the eye reading along the text.
• Sans-serif fonts, on the other hand, make the eye stop.
There...
Putting it on the page
Aligning text
1. Flush left
2. Center
3. Flush right
Using columns
1. Both left and right
2. Left, ...
Q: Is this sample better?
Campus Address
600 Prospect Street, Box #160
Trinidad, CO 81082
yourname@cccs.student.edu
719-84...
Adding a graphic element
May include horizontal line
May possibly include a small graphic element
Coordinate design strategies
• Match design with rest of résumé
– Use same font types
– Use consistent layout
• Match with...
Proofread with a magnifying
glass
• Triple-check for accuracy
• One typo could cost you an
interview!
• View some examples...
The Education Section
What is an education section?
• A section that emphasizes your educational
background and formal training,
individualizing...
Purposes: to inform and
persuade
• Give information about your schooling and
training
• Persuade employers your educationa...
Where should you place this
section?
• Above or below your experience section?
• It depends…
– Which is stronger, your edu...
The “bare bones” education
section
• Schools you have attended, including universities, community
colleges, technical scho...
Are we done yet?
Education
A.A.S in Gunsmithing
Trinidad State Junior College
Trinidad, Colorado
Graduation Date:
May 2010...
What else may be included?
Extra information about your degree (major,
minor or selective GPAs, funding sources,
honors, e...
Questions to answer
What are my current and cumulative
GPAs?
Any honors related to my degree?
What language proficiencies ...
Designing content for readers
• Consider using…
o Subheadings
o Indenting
o Columns/tables
o Parentheses
o Bulleted lists
...
Are we done now?
A.A.S. in Gunsmithing May 2010
Trinidad State Junior College, Trinidad, Colorado (Graduated with Honors*)...
The Experience Section
What is an experience section?
• A section that demonstrates your most
relevant experience in work or activities.
• Other ...
Informing to persuade
• Provide information to help persuade
prospective employers that your experiences
make you qualifie...
What goes into this section?
• Company or organization and location
(city, state)
• Position title
• Dates of employment o...
Where should you put this
section?
• Above or below your education section?
• It depends…
– How much work experience do yo...
Getting started…
List your past and present experiences.
Include:
– jobs
– volunteer positions
– appointments
– assistants...
Describing experiences
• To tailor the content of this section, circle
each item that is…
– Related to your career goals
–...
Developing your descriptions
• Use varied action words to describe experiences
• Answer the journalistic questions:
– Who?...
Developing your descriptions
Example
Before:
planned activities
Questions asked: What kinds?, How?,When?,
ForWhom?
After:
...
Making your descriptions
parallel
COLUMN A
• Recording OSHA regulated
documents
• Material purchasing and
expediting
• Pre...
Try to see your experiences as
a professional would
UNDERSTATED
– Answered phone
– Wiped tables
PROFESSIONAL
– Acted as li...
Ways to tailor this section
• Select content that supports your
qualifications and matches job description
• Consider orga...
A formula for success
• Tailor for your audience
• Use appropriate headings
• Included required content
• Organize your se...
The Honors and Activities
Section
What is an honors and
activities section?
• A section that emphasizes your
participation in relevant activities and any
ho...
Why bother?
• Fill up white space
• Provide additional evidence of your
qualifications
• Give employers a sense of who you...
Where does this section go?
• Usually last section on the page
• Can be moved up if information is especially
important or...
What goes into it?
Draw three columns, one for each of the
following:
• Titles or positions
• Sponsors or affiliated organ...
Exploring content possibilities
• Extracurricular activities
• Awards, grants, prizes, and special honors
• Memberships in...
Big or little? Major or minor?
• How relevant are your honors and activities
to the job you are applying to?
• Which honor...
Two approaches
Minimal approach
Gunsmithing Club,Trinidad State Junior College
January 2010-Present
Elaborated approach
Pr...
Using visual design
• Simple list
• Columns
• List with bulleted descriptions
• Coordinate with other sections
Plan of attack
• Brainstorm
• Decide what to include based on relevance,
interest-value, and space considerations
• Match ...
• Employers will usually take only thirty-five seconds
to look at your résumé
• Design your résumé so that employers can r...
Quadrant Test
Each one of your quadrants should
have an equal amount of text and
white space (empty space where
there is n...
For More Help Developing
Your Résumé…
Contact your CTE Career Services
Coordinator
Alamosa Campus
Victor Salazar
CTE Caree...
This has been a workshop series brought to you by
Trinidad State Junior College
CTE Career Services Department
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Developing your Resume

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Transcript of "Developing your Resume"

  1. 1. With Résumé Development 1st Step Toward Your Career
  2. 2. Two Locations One Great College
  3. 3. Developing Your Résumé A workshop series brought to you by Trinidad State Junior College CTE Career Services
  4. 4. Overview of Sections • The Objective Statement • Qualification Highlights/Profile • Contact Information/Résumé Heading • Education • Experience • Honors and Activities
  5. 5. The Objective Statement
  6. 6. What is an objective statement? • A short section (usually 1-3 lines), often in the form of a sentence fragment, immediately below your contact information • An “at a glance” picture of you and your career interests • Other names: Professional Objective, Career Objective, Résumé Capsule, Career Goals, etc.
  7. 7. Why write one? • Emphasize key qualifications, skills and/or goals • Help your readers find what they need to know quickly • Make a good first impression • Relate company goals to personal goals
  8. 8. Q: Is this a good objective statement? • Well-written but raises too many questions • For example: What kind of internship? • What knowledge? • What kinds of expertise? • Which areas? • How will you contribute to this company? An internship allowing me to utilize my knowledge and expertise in different areas
  9. 9. A good objective statement answers questions • What position(s) are you applying for? • What are your main qualifications? • What are your career goals? • What is your professional identity? • How can you help the company?
  10. 10. The importance of tailoring • Sometimes one size does NOT fit all • Each person and employer is unique in certain ways • Aim for a custom fit when possible, but how?
  11. 11. Getting started... Reflect on your overall qualifications and career goals: In what ways are they typical? Unique? Research individual employers in your field: In what ways are employers alike? Different?
  12. 12. Questions about you • What are your main qualifications, strengths, skills, and areas of expertise? • What position(s)--or type of position--are you seeking? • What are some of your professional goals? • What type of organization or work setting are you most interested in?
  13. 13. Questions about employers • What qualifications are most desired by employers in your field? • What positions are available on the job market? What are they titled? • What are some goals of the organizations that interest you? • What kinds of organizations are now hiring?
  14. 14. “Instant” objective statements • For practice, fill in the parts in brackets – To utilize my [qualifications, strengths, or skills] as a [position title] – A position as a [position title] for [company name] allowing me to develop my [qualifications, strengths, or skills] – An opportunity to [professional goal] in a [type of organization, work environment, or field] – [position title] with emphasis in [areas of expertise]
  15. 15. Which of your objective statements is “best”? • The one that best… – Emphasizes your qualifications and/or goals – Appeals to employer expectations • A trick question:You’ll probably need to write more than one objective statement. • Tailor for each type of position that interests you and, for best results, modify for each particular employer (as necessary)
  16. 16. Examples of what my objective should sound like Different types of objectives: • Specific and open; not limiting. • Example: “To manage people, interface with customers, and work with highly technical software or hardware applications.” • The above objective is specific but not limiting. This objective could apply to many different jobs, yet the skills described are quite specific.
  17. 17. Career Objectives • Objectives should reflect the employer's perspective, not yours, and should tell what you can contribute. • An objective should demonstrate the value you will add to the organization. • Objectives should be as concise as possible but should contain the skills an employer is looking for in their job applicant. • Use the company’s job description to take the skills they are looking for and the skills you bring to the table in order to write a detailed career objective.
  18. 18. Specific Career Objectives JOB DESCRIPTION POSITION: FRONT DESK RECEPTIONIST MUST: BE AT LEAST 18YEARS OF AGE AND ABLE TO GETTOTHE JOB SITE SKILLS: RECEPTIONIST EXPERIENCE IS REQUIRED DUTIES: GREETING CUSTOMERS,CUSTOMER SERVICE,ANSWERING PHONES AND TAKING MESSAGES. COMPUTER DATA ENTRYAND DUTIES AS ASSIGNED WAGE: $8.00 AN HOUR, EMPLOYER PAYS ONTHE 1ST AND 15TH OFTHE MONTH BENEFITS:HEALTH INSURANCE AFTER 120 DAYS, RETIREMENT BENEFIT AFTER 1YR, PAID HOLIDAYS ANDVACATION ACCURAL AFTER 4 MONTHS JOB STARTS:AFTERTHE FIRST OFTHEYEAR, 2008 DURATION: FULL-TIME, PERMANENT JOB SHIFT: 8AMTO 5PM MONDAYTHRU FRIDAY HOWTO APPLY: GO DIRECTWITH A résumé, MIGHT BE INTERVIEWED IMMEDIATELY DEADLINE: DECEMBER 14, 2007 LOCATION:TRINIDAD, CO YOU MUST BE REGISTEREDWITHTHE COLORADO WORKFORCE CENTERTO APPLY FORTHIS JOB GOTO www.connectingcolorado.com TO REGISTER. FOR QUESTIONS CALL 719-846-9221.
  19. 19. Specific Career Objectives • Take the skills and capabilities that they are looking for in an employee SKILLS: RECEPTIONIST EXPERIENCE IS REQUIRED DUTIES: GREETING CUSTOMERS, CUSTOMER SERVICE, ANSWERING PHONES AND TAKING MESSAGES. COMPUTER DATA ENTRY AND DUTIES AS ASSIGNED
  20. 20. Specific Career Objectives • State the skills that you have and the skills that the employers are looking for and write them in a specific career objective Objective: To utilize my knowledge as a receptionist to effectively greet customers, answer phones, properly take messages, enter data efficiently and any other receptionist duties as they arise
  21. 21. Specific Career Objectives Different types of objectives: • Specific to position • Objective: To utilize my knowledge as a receptionist to effectively greet customers, answer phones, properly take messages, enter data efficiently and any other receptionist duties as they arise • The above objective is specific to the position. It shows the organization that you have the qualifications and are clear about the position that you are applying for.
  22. 22. Qualification Highlights, Career Summaries, or Profiles
  23. 23. Qualification Highlights, Career Summary, or Profile Section • Objectives may help sharpen the focus of your résumé, especially if your experience is very diverse, or you are switching into a career not supported by the experience listed on your résumé. • Whether or not you choose to include an objective, you may wish to present a skills or qualifications section on your résumé. • If you choose not to list an objective on your résumé, you may choose to discuss your objective in your cover letter and place a Qualification Highlights or Career Summary section at the top that highlights your qualifications.
  24. 24. Qualification Highlights, Career Summary, or Profile Section • The goal is to summarize your experience and perhaps highlight one or two of your skills and/or contributions. • You hope to grab your reader’s attention in two or three sentences with a power pack of the skills and attributes you have developed throughout your career. • Good summaries are short; you don’t want to show all your aces in the first few lines!
  25. 25. Qualification Highlights, Career Summary, or Profile Section • You may replace the objective with a Qualification Highlights Section that summarizes your qualifications and serves as an objective. • However, be aware several employers prefer that they see an objective on your résumé.
  26. 26. Qualification Highlights Section QUALIFICATION HIGHLIGHTS • Bachelor of Science in Psychology • Excellent communication, leadership, and inter-personal skills • Proficient in Microsoft PowerPoint,Word, Publisher and Excel
  27. 27. Career Summary • Strongly motivated graduate with experience in hospital, sub-acute and other health care settings. • Clinical skills combine with dedication to excellent patient care, compassion, and professionalism to integrate patients’ medical and emotional care. • Able to relate to patients quickly and work effectively with physicians, peers, and other health care professionals. Conscientious, team-oriented and eager to learn. Registered Nurse
  28. 28. Career Summary or Profile Apartment Manager PROFESSIONAL PROFILE • Highly motivated, dynamic and energetic with over 30 combined years of experience successfully working with diverse personalities. • Experienced management and maintenance of various houses and complexes • Possess strong organizational skills and effective paper processing techniques • Expert bookkeeping abilities. • Personable, loyal, honest, committed, creative, able to maintain property impeccably, and get along well with tenants and management
  29. 29. The Contact Information Section – Résumé Heading
  30. 30. What is a contact information section – Résumé Heading? • Easy answer… • A section that – Provides information to help prospective employers contact you – Presents a first impression – Is usually located at the top of the page
  31. 31. What may you include? • First and Last Name, of course! (M. Initial recommended) • Address (complete mailing address with ZIP Code) (no abbreviations: Ave. , St. , Dr., Blvd.) • Phone (with Area Code) – Campus (Optional) – Permanent • Email (Make sure you check it regularly)! • Web address (optional) • Fax number (optional) • Any other means of contact
  32. 32. Q: Is this a good sample? Your Name Here 1234 Streetname, #1 Trinidad, CO 81082 Student@cccs.student.edu 719-846-####
  33. 33. Moving beyond the typewriter  Use design strategies  Picking fonts  Size  Type  Highlighting  Using layout  Alignment  Columns  Coordinate with rest of résumé
  34. 34. Using fonts • Size: how big is big enough?Too big? • Two major kinds: – Serif – Sans serif • Text highlighting: bold, italics, caps, underline, special effects
  35. 35. Using fonts Below are some common fonts styles and sizes.
  36. 36. Serif and Sans-serif Fonts • By manipulating the fonts used in your résumé, you can easily create a hierarchy of information. • Serifs are the short stems on the ends of the strokes of a letter, as in T of the TIMES NEW ROMAN font. • Sans-serif fonts are fonts without stems — sans means without, as in the I of the ARIAL font. Here are some examples of the two kinds of fonts. Serif Fonts Sans-Serif Fonts
  37. 37. • Serif fonts tend to keep the eye reading along the text. • Sans-serif fonts, on the other hand, make the eye stop. Therefore, sans-serif fonts are typically used for headings and titles, allowing the reader to quickly locate information, while serif fonts are used for descriptions. • Be consistent. For example, if you decide to use a sans-serif font for a main heading, do so for all your headings, and use the same sans-serif font each time. You should never use more than two fonts in your résumé. Serif and Sans-serif Fonts
  38. 38. Putting it on the page Aligning text 1. Flush left 2. Center 3. Flush right Using columns 1. Both left and right 2. Left, right and center
  39. 39. Q: Is this sample better? Campus Address 600 Prospect Street, Box #160 Trinidad, CO 81082 yourname@cccs.student.edu 719-846-#### Permanent Address 4321 Streetname Anytown, CO ##### http://univ.edu/~login 719-846-1234 Your Name Here
  40. 40. Adding a graphic element May include horizontal line May possibly include a small graphic element
  41. 41. Coordinate design strategies • Match design with rest of résumé – Use same font types – Use consistent layout • Match with cover letter – Make stationary template based on contact info – Use same paper for all application documents • Aim for a professional package
  42. 42. Proofread with a magnifying glass • Triple-check for accuracy • One typo could cost you an interview! • View some examples of common headers and some step by step instructions to get you started
  43. 43. The Education Section
  44. 44. What is an education section? • A section that emphasizes your educational background and formal training, individualizing for an organization. • Usually a major section for college students and recent graduates
  45. 45. Purposes: to inform and persuade • Give information about your schooling and training • Persuade employers your educational background is relevant to the job, providing evidence of your qualifications • Help your résumé stand out from others in the stack
  46. 46. Where should you place this section? • Above or below your experience section? • It depends… – Which is stronger, your education or your work experience section? – How much relevant work experience do you have? • Place strongest, most relevant section closest to top of the page
  47. 47. The “bare bones” education section • Schools you have attended, including universities, community colleges, technical schools, etc. • Location of school(s) • Date of graduation, actual or anticipated • Degree(s) earned or pursued • Grade Point Average (GPA) (Optional) Know when to use it! • Courses taken outside of typical major classes that may add to qualifications of job
  48. 48. Are we done yet? Education A.A.S in Gunsmithing Trinidad State Junior College Trinidad, Colorado Graduation Date: May 2010 GPA: 3.8/4.0
  49. 49. What else may be included? Extra information about your degree (major, minor or selective GPAs, funding sources, honors, etc.)—usually listed or included in parentheses Specializations and special projects—usually listed or described briefly Other relevant skills and training (relevant coursework, computer skills, language proficiency, certifications, licenses, etc.)—may be subsections or separate sections
  50. 50. Questions to answer What are my current and cumulative GPAs? Any honors related to my degree? What language proficiencies do I have? What are my areas of emphasis, specialization, or concentration? What special course or degree related projects may be relevant? What courses have I taken that are related to my career goals? With what computer programs am I most familiar? Any certifications or licenses? Do I have any on-the-job educational training such as in-house training programs?
  51. 51. Designing content for readers • Consider using… o Subheadings o Indenting o Columns/tables o Parentheses o Bulleted lists o Paragraphs • Match with rest of page
  52. 52. Are we done now? A.A.S. in Gunsmithing May 2010 Trinidad State Junior College, Trinidad, Colorado (Graduated with Honors*) Completed all required courses, including but not limited to:  Basic and Advanced Barreling  Stockmaking  Repair  Firearms History and Development  Bluing and Finishing  Bench Metal and Machine Shop *GPA: 3.8/4.0 Education  1911 Gunsmithing Courses  Custom Revolver  AR-15 Accuracy  Hand Cut Checkering  Hand Cut Engraving  Shotgunsmithing with Jack Rowe
  53. 53. The Experience Section
  54. 54. What is an experience section? • A section that demonstrates your most relevant experience in work or activities. • Other common names: Professional Experience, Work History, FieldWork,VolunteerWork, etc. • Special names: Technical Experience, Supervisory Experience,Aviation Experience, etc.
  55. 55. Informing to persuade • Provide information to help persuade prospective employers that your experiences make you qualified for the job and that you align with the organization’s goals • Help your résumé stand out from others in the stack • Construct your professional identity
  56. 56. What goes into this section? • Company or organization and location (city, state) • Position title • Dates of employment or involvement • Descriptions of responsibilities, duties, achievements, etc. • Use action verbs to describe duties!
  57. 57. Where should you put this section? • Above or below your education section? • It depends… – How much work experience do you have? – Which is stronger, your education or your work experience section? • Place strongest, most relevant section closest to top of the page
  58. 58. Getting started… List your past and present experiences. Include: – jobs – volunteer positions – appointments – assistantships – internships – any activities that used the same duties or qualifications that may be used in the job you’re applying for
  59. 59. Describing experiences • To tailor the content of this section, circle each item that is… – Related to your career goals – Asked for in job ads and descriptions • Choose one experience you circled and describe briefly
  60. 60. Developing your descriptions • Use varied action words to describe experiences • Answer the journalistic questions: – Who?…With whom did you work? – What? …What duties did you perform? – Where? …Where did your job fit into the organization? – Why? …What goals were you trying to accomplish? – When? …What timelines were you working under? – How? …What procedures did you follow?
  61. 61. Developing your descriptions Example Before: planned activities Questions asked: What kinds?, How?,When?, ForWhom? After: planned arts and crafts activities and exercises weekly for physically-challenged children
  62. 62. Making your descriptions parallel COLUMN A • Recording OSHA regulated documents • Material purchasing and expediting • Prepared weekly field payroll • Responsible for charge orders COLUMN B • Recorded OSHA regulated documents • Conducted material purchasing and expediting • Prepared weekly payroll • Processed charge orders
  63. 63. Try to see your experiences as a professional would UNDERSTATED – Answered phone – Wiped tables PROFESSIONAL – Acted as liaison between clients and legal staff – Created healthy environment for customers and maintained positive public image
  64. 64. Ways to tailor this section • Select content that supports your qualifications and matches job description • Consider organizing by order of importance • Use professional wording, integrating job- specific terms, verbs are action-oriented
  65. 65. A formula for success • Tailor for your audience • Use appropriate headings • Included required content • Organize your section strategically • Develop your descriptions • Make your descriptions parallel • See through potential employer’s eyes
  66. 66. The Honors and Activities Section
  67. 67. What is an honors and activities section? • A section that emphasizes your participation in relevant activities and any honors you have received • Other names – Awards – Memberships – VolunteerWork
  68. 68. Why bother? • Fill up white space • Provide additional evidence of your qualifications • Give employers a sense of who you are outside of school and work
  69. 69. Where does this section go? • Usually last section on the page • Can be moved up if information is especially important or relevant • Sometimes omitted if there is a lack of space or relevant information
  70. 70. What goes into it? Draw three columns, one for each of the following: • Titles or positions • Sponsors or affiliated organizations • Dates of involvement (M/Y-M/Y orY-Y)
  71. 71. Exploring content possibilities • Extracurricular activities • Awards, grants, prizes, and special honors • Memberships in professional clubs and organization • Volunteer activities
  72. 72. Big or little? Major or minor? • How relevant are your honors and activities to the job you are applying to? • Which honors and activities would most interest prospective employers? • How much space do you have? Choose and organize your information to emphasize the most relevant activities.
  73. 73. Two approaches Minimal approach Gunsmithing Club,Trinidad State Junior College January 2010-Present Elaborated approach President, Gunsmithing Club,Trinidad State Junior College January 2010-Present  Organized campus contest  Increased membership with promotional efforts
  74. 74. Using visual design • Simple list • Columns • List with bulleted descriptions • Coordinate with other sections
  75. 75. Plan of attack • Brainstorm • Decide what to include based on relevance, interest-value, and space considerations • Match organization and design with rest of résumé • Seek critical feedback
  76. 76. • Employers will usually take only thirty-five seconds to look at your résumé • Design your résumé so that employers can read the document easily and process information quickly. • Conform to the conventional format of a résumé Why is the design of my résumé so important?
  77. 77. Quadrant Test Each one of your quadrants should have an equal amount of text and white space (empty space where there is no text). When your page is balanced, the reader will typically read anything in quadrant 1 first. Followed by Quadrant 2. So, you should put your most important information — anything you want the employer to see first — in quadrant 1 and 2.
  78. 78. For More Help Developing Your Résumé… Contact your CTE Career Services Coordinator Alamosa Campus Victor Salazar CTE Career Services Coordinator Valley Campus Office 136 1011 Main Street Alamosa, CO 81101 Victor.Salazar@trinidadstate.edu 1-800-411-8382 Ext: 7031 Trinidad Campus Ron Barros CTE Career/Special Services Coordinator Berg Building Room 210 600 Prospect Street Trinidad, CO 81082 Ron.Barros@trinidadstate.edu 1-800-621-8752 Ext: 5456
  79. 79. This has been a workshop series brought to you by Trinidad State Junior College CTE Career Services Department
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