Growing up Cyborg<br />A brief look into the present, past and future of connected play, interaction and communication in ...
we are all <br />cyborgs<br />
cyborg<br />an organism “to which exogenous components<br />have been added for the purpose of <br />adaptingto new enviro...
Flickr: cybertoad<br />
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/119/293670483_cbce23bdde_b.jpg<br />Flickr: soylentgreen23<br />
traditionalanthropology<br />
Flickr: futurestreet<br />cyborganthropology<br />
I. Present DayII. Youth CultureIII. A short history of the future IV. The future<br />
Flickr: soylentgreen23<br />I. Present Day<br />
the<br />automatic<br />production<br />ofspace<br />
frictionless<br />value <br />production<br />Flickr: Ivan Walsh<br />
towards<br />a value <br />crisis<br />
Hyperlinked<br />Memories<br />
Persistent<br />Paleontology<br />
devices<br />and their <br />discontents<br />
devices<br />and their <br />discontents<br />
Panic <br />architecture<br />
this is your<br />second self<br />
Maintenance<br />of the <br />second <br />self <br />
presentation <br />of self in<br />digital life<br />
ambientintimacy<br />LeisaReichelt<br />
Flickr: piet_musterd<br />
+1<br />psychological<br />effects<br />
II. Youth Culture<br />
Infants have a second self before they are even born.<br />
Why text messaging vs. phone calls?<br />
Workand Play<br />
Reality isn’t always fun<br />
Reality isn’t always fast<br />
Reality is +5 points!<br />
Reality is 5 stars!<br />
Accelerated Rewards<br />
Merging of Analog and Virtual<br />
The backyard is now a digital space<br />
Second selves become actual selves <br />
Social<br />grooming<br />
facebook and privacy <br />
slideshare.net/padday/the-real-life-social-network-v2<br />@padday UX at Google <br />
Bullying doesn’t end when school is over. <br />
Level Ups<br />+1 Friend<br />+1 Follower<br />
technosocial<br />training<br />wheels<br />
Kids are training for their future world<br />
A community that increasingly transcends time and space.<br />
What next?<br />
Feed, by M.T. Anderson<br />
III. A History of the future <br />
Self-Portrait<br />of Steve Mann with Wearable Computing Apparatus<br />1981.<br />
RememberThe Milk<br />Contextual Notification Systems<br />Virtual Post-It Noteswith <br />Image Processing in 1995.<br />
Diminished Reality<br /><ul><li>Adding your own layer onto reality
Replacing public messages with your own</li></li></ul><li>Evolution of Technology<br /><ul><li>Over time computing technol...
Components become almost invisible</li></li></ul><li>Steve Mann Today<br /><ul><li>Extremely lightweight equipment
Everyone will have this in their pocket</li></li></ul><li>FunctionalLocation-Based Reminder Applications - 2006<br />
IV. The future<br />
The Internet <br />is not a machine<br />
The Internet <br />is human<br />
The future of advertising ispeople. <br />Flickr: piet_musterd<br />
Reducing the time and space between need and fulfillment. <br />
Connectivity increases <br />opportunity.<br />
Relevant information should be pushed to users, instead of having to seek it out.<br />
Reality should unfold like a videogame.<br />Autosubscribing Geo-local RSS feeds<br />Notifications when you enter a quadr...
You Schedule a Meeting<br />You say 3pm.<br />You think he’ll show up precisely at 3.<br />
Uncertainty Ensues<br />15 minutes before, you start getting anxious.<br />He could show up any time between now and 3:30!...
Co-location Negotiation<br />These redundant messages can be eliminated if you know where someone is.<br />
Proximal Notification<br />
<ul><li>Doesn’t update as often as desired
Another device to charge every day </li></ul>Boost Mobile Phone Running Instamapper<br />
Home Automation<br />When you check in to your house, your lights turn on!<br />When you leave the house, your lights turn...
AutomaticCheck-ins<br />
Geonotes<br />Location-Based Reminders<br />
Flickr: awnisALAN<br />Location-Based Campaigns<br />If done intelligently, relevant information sent to users. <br />
Trigger-Based Campaigns<br />Set triggers based on an action the user has taken. <br />
Don’t Eat That!<br /><ul><li>Made by Reid Beels at Geoloqi Hackathon
Sends users notifications of restaurants nearby their location that are below a threshold of cleanliness. </li></li></ul><...
The best technologyis invisibleIt should get out of the way and connect people.<br />
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Speech at Warner Brothers - Growing up Cyborg

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A 45-min speech given at Warner Bros. HQ about the tech and humans in current day, youth culture, a history of the future and the future.

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  • We’re all growing up connected. Getting used to your second self.
  • More about stevemann
  • But not the cyborgs you think.
  • an organism “to which exogenous componentshave been added for the purpose of adapting to new environments”
  • Our first tools were extensions of the physical self We’ve been cyborgs from the first tools But – they’ve extended physical selves – not the mental selves. Flickr: cybertoad but really we&apos;ve always been borg from the first toolsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 GenericYou are free:to Share — to copy, distribute and transmit the workUnder the following conditions:Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). 
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  • And technology extendsthe mental self. But these new tools bring with them very curious things.They cry, and we have to pick them up. We have to replace them.
  • cybog anthropology is looking at the technologized worlds and firuging out what kinds of strange tools they use And cyborg anthropology looks at technologically advanced cultures and examines their tool use and strange customs.
  • But you get an automatic production of space! You can putall sorts of things into computers and devices. Photos, software, writing, ect. It’s like Mary Poppins technology. In reality, if you put a bunch of pictures into a room, that room gets full. When you put information into a hard drive, the hard drive stays the same weight. When you put information onto the Internet, you don’t feel the weight at all. The weight is being stored somewhere else. ‘What does 9 years of data really look like?
  • If you take all of the material out of the average computer and print it out, what do you get?Cutwater agency did this in a campaign for Maxtor hard drives. They took 8 years of digital photos, printed them out, and stuck them together. And this is what it looked like. How do we get all this info! Well, it’s really easy to create.
  • It’s easier to put something itno a computer than take it out. Any of you with tons of digital photos know this.
  • When anyone can make this – apps and things – there become a value crises. Too much stuff. Early on Facebook, a billion requests plauged every user – and they were eventually hidden under this requests rug.
  • And as we start to use the web for all of our data, we begin to get hyperlinked memories. Instead of real memories, we’re beginning to have hyperlinked memories. Digital Anthropologist Michael Wesch talked about a bunch of kids getting together to hang out. In reality, kids try to one-up each other with the best stories. In this case, they were trying to link each other to the best YouTube videos. Memories had become hyperlinks. When one uploads images online, those images become hyperlinked memories. An address book or online document or E-mail is also a hyperlinked memory. It is an external memory stored outside the self for later access.
  • To get to these hyperlinked memories, we must become increasingly skilled virtual paleontologists. The E-mail inbox is the best example of this. Every day our memories and data is covered by a new layer of dust, spam, and items to be responded to. If we need something from our past, we must dig through the newly accumulated items in order to get it. But instead of using a hammer and a chisel, brush and field notebook, we use keywords and search results, tags and categories.
  • We’re all superhumans. You can hear all the way across the world and back but if you break the phone, you can’t hear anymore. Then it breaks and you can’t use it anymore. In Freud&apos;s Civilization and Its Discontents, he warns of &quot;a possible future in which the magnificence of humans as prosthetic gods is tempered by the ill-fitting and troublesome nature of our auxiliary organs” (11).
  • If you keep a device for too long, it turns against you.
  • An Extended Nervous Systems leads to the need
  • Simultaneous time also causes social punctuation, as technosocial connectivity seeps into every part of social relations.
  • In co-creating your self with a digital device, you develop an identity in relation to others. This identity is either interesting or not interesting. If it is interesting, an ocular convergence, or set of virtual attention can attach itself to a virtual identity. This gives a person a certain amount of gravity with respect to others. One’s status updates must be technosocially attractive to viewers, or else identity loses gravity. Brands, and increasingly individuals, seek to increase gravity. Many of them fail. The ones who succeed become helpful, service-oriented personas, or they become icons of entertainment. Identity Production is the conscious production of identity through action, whether the action is physical, mental, virtual or both. The production of identity in virtual reality can occur on a social network, through text, image or video and can occur in small moments or large ones. Psychologist Sherry Turkle was one of the first to use the phrase “second self” to identify our bodies in virtual space. She considers the computer not as a &quot;tool,&quot; but as an extension of the psychological and social self in reality.Cyberspace allows one to sample the self – that is, choose which pieces of the self to present the self with. A person experiences thousands of moments every day. The moments one chooses to report shape one’s identity.second self is beginning to define you more than your dna doesthe borg part - online part defines you as much as your DNA does, and it is increasingly the case. Updating and maintaining the freshness of your online self will become as routine and crucial as maintaining ones hygiene by showering, brushing one&quot;/ hair and wearing clothes that fit well enough as to not be alienated from society i’ve seen people on youtube getting stressed that their profile hasn’t been updated in a fe years, or people writing blog posts explaining why they haven’t posted in a while. there is a guilt for not updating. but new architectrues make it easier to update. (twitter). And the same bullying that was in Analog life carries over into the digital world - what we managed to forget that we went through In middle school is not only present online, but easily accessed. Instead of s transitory nature, one&apos;s harsh words hitting and dissipating, there&apos;s a whole geology lof the stuff online. One of my habits is to go to support sites for popular websites and see what conflicts have arisen. Foursquare is one of the worst. The support tickets are full of 13 and 14 year old girls desperately trying to get foursquare to ban their classmates, who have left &apos;tips&apos; all over town that send derogatory messages to any friends who check into a venue (is there enough time to really make a solid point on this? Perhaps there&apos;s a faster way to pro be this by just entioninb the mean things people say online, archived by the library of congress. \\i like to look at support tickets of various popular web systems. foursquare has issues now where teenage girls will leave mean tips all over venues, so that  as their enemies can go around town they get taunted by virtual notes. this is one of the most frequent and intense support ticket i see filed. it is not the fault of the technology, but simple human nature. at this age, any medium is used for people to pick on another. it manifests through every medium, but it is strange to see such personal fights show up in a public forum. online self can matter and be larger and more important than your offline self (looking at their picture of a person as they walk up to the actual person) -- mit, second self little digital marker thing that people wear with their facebook profile on it. geography and psychological profiling is annihiliated. no longer matters. so someone who is picked on in real life can have a bevy healthy online life because they are connected to people mentally and with interests …that in a small town they wouldn&apos;t be able to find.when you look yourself up online, those are the edges of your digital body.. and you have to extend it or protect it. 36/ now one has to protect portions of the self from seeping out when they’re not there to defend it. a privacy leak in digital life is like having someone break into your hour or spray paint your lawn. people abusing your inbox is like having people put garden gnomes on your front lawn In some cases, posting on one&quot;/ wall is like posting a sign in the front lawn of one&apos;s house for everyone to see. In the same way that security and locks on doors are so very important in the real world, they are becoming crucial in the digital world as well. It&apos;s becoming important to develop a sort of extended nervous system in order to see where all the bits of the second self are being speared. If one doesn&apos;t know here they are, there is no way to react to them. Participating in a free online community or sales site means that your every interaction. comes with ganglia - your profile, who you are and what you&apos;ve purchased the other important thing about maintaining a second self is that one’s digital self has different looking boundaries that one also has to protect. it’s not just about grooming the digital self by uploading fresh photos and responding to messages, but making sure that information is seen by the correct people and not the wrong ones.Online Self Can becomeMore important Than your Actual selfAnd you have to be concerned with security
  • In co-creating your self with a digital device, you develop an identity in relation to others. This identity is either interesting or not interesting. If it is interesting, an ocular convergence, or set of virtual attention can attach itself to a virtual identity. This gives a person a certain amount of gravity with respect to others. One’s status updates must be technosocially attractive to viewers, or else identity loses gravity. Brands, and increasingly individuals, seek to increase gravity. Many of them fail. The ones who succeed become helpful, service-oriented personas, or they become icons of entertainment. Identity Production is the conscious production of identity through action, whether the action is physical, mental, virtual or both. The production of identity in virtual reality can occur on a social network, through text, image or video and can occur in small moments or large ones. Psychologist Sherry Turkle was one of the first to use the phrase “second self” to identify our bodies in virtual space. She considers the computer not as a &quot;tool,&quot; but as an extension of the psychological and social self in reality.Cyberspace allows one to sample the self – that is, choose which pieces of the self to present the self with. A person experiences thousands of moments every day. The moments one chooses to report shape one’s identity.second self is beginning to define you more than your dna doesthe borg part - online part defines you as much as your DNA does, and it is increasingly the case. Updating and maintaining the freshness of your online self will become as routine and crucial as maintaining ones hygiene by showering, brushing one&quot;/ hair and wearing clothes that fit well enough as to not be alienated from society i’ve seen people on youtube getting stressed that their profile hasn’t been updated in a fe years, or people writing blog posts explaining why they haven’t posted in a while. there is a guilt for not updating. but new architectrues make it easier to update. (twitter). And the same bullying that was in Analog life carries over into the digital world - what we managed to forget that we went through In middle school is not only present online, but easily accessed. Instead of s transitory nature, one&apos;s harsh words hitting and dissipating, there&apos;s a whole geology lof the stuff online. One of my habits is to go to support sites for popular websites and see what conflicts have arisen. Foursquare is one of the worst. The support tickets are full of 13 and 14 year old girls desperately trying to get foursquare to ban their classmates, who have left &apos;tips&apos; all over town that send derogatory messages to any friends who check into a venue (is there enough time to really make a solid point on this? Perhaps there&apos;s a faster way to pro be this by just entioninb the mean things people say online, archived by the library of congress. \\i like to look at support tickets of various popular web systems. foursquare has issues now where teenage girls will leave mean tips all over venues, so that  as their enemies can go around town they get taunted by virtual notes. this is one of the most frequent and intense support ticket i see filed. it is not the fault of the technology, but simple human nature. at this age, any medium is used for people to pick on another. it manifests through every medium, but it is strange to see such personal fights show up in a public forum. online self can matter and be larger and more important than your offline self (looking at their picture of a person as they walk up to the actual person) -- mit, second self little digital marker thing that people wear with their facebook profile on it. geography and psychological profiling is annihiliated. no longer matters. so someone who is picked on in real life can have a bevy healthy online life because they are connected to people mentally and with interests …that in a small town they wouldn&apos;t be able to find.when you look yourself up online, those are the edges of your digital body.. and you have to extend it or protect it. 36/ now one has to protect portions of the self from seeping out when they’re not there to defend it. a privacy leak in digital life is like having someone break into your hour or spray paint your lawn. people abusing your inbox is like having people put garden gnomes on your front lawn In some cases, posting on one&quot;/ wall is like posting a sign in the front lawn of one&apos;s house for everyone to see. In the same way that security and locks on doors are so very important in the real world, they are becoming crucial in the digital world as well. It&apos;s becoming important to develop a sort of extended nervous system in order to see where all the bits of the second self are being speared. If one doesn&apos;t know here they are, there is no way to react to them. Participating in a free online community or sales site means that your every interaction. comes with ganglia - your profile, who you are and what you&apos;ve purchased the other important thing about maintaining a second self is that one’s digital self has different looking boundaries that one also has to protect. it’s not just about grooming the digital self by uploading fresh photos and responding to messages, but making sure that information is seen by the correct people and not the wrong ones.Online Self Can becomeMore important Than your Actual selfAnd you have to be concerned with security
  • Where do we our own selves end and our own selves begin? We’re storing ourselves on these devices. How do you present yourself online?
  • It’s not that we’re always connected, but that we have always ability to connect. This is ambient intimacy, where connectivity is only a button away. Where sharing and connecting with another is not defined by geography but technosocial capability.David Weinberger called it “continual partial friendship”, and Johnnie Moore pointed out that, “it’s not about being poked and prodded, it’s about exposing more surface area for others to connect with”.Ambient intimacy. that sharing it&apos;s &quot;about exposing MIT’s a higher level of connectivity the collective now. Sheldon Renan calls it “Loosely but deeply entangled”.Whatever you call it, it is a higher order of connectivity than we’ve ever experienced before as humans. We are beginning to see a new sense of time - the collective now.This is a result of ambient intimacy - Lisa Reichelt Ambient Intimacy - the potential to be connected to anybody at any time, no matter where you are in the world i was at a conference at mit and we were discussing whether or not social media drew people away from each other. a man, normally very stoic and professional, suddenly became very passionate. &quot;when i was in japan,&apos; he said, &quot;i got a message that my sister had died&quot;. i was in a foreign country where nothing was familiar, and completely unable to go home. i had no one to talk to, no one to hug, and no one to commiserate with. except i had a twitter account. with a bit of hesitation, i decided to post the message online. within seconds there was an outpouring of support and care that transcended the distance between where i physically was and where they were. i suddenly felt hugged and cared for in the middle of an environment i didn&apos;t understand. this can be a good thing -- a guy i knew lost his sister, and he was in japan - and he had no one to talk to. then he looked in his pocket and found his phone - it has twitter. he tweeted it. and from all over the world, people hugged him on twitter, and he philologically felt better, even though it was hugs from strangers that barely knew him and had never met him before in real life. in the same time instead of delving in with a friend and to a topic, we have shallow topics we swirl around for a while and then move on
  • Network as villageIt’s like there are all of these people in your pocket all of the time – that at any time you can touch. If you looked at how close they are digitally – they’re this close. You can be in the middle of the desert and they will still be this close. Story about a man in japan who just learned he lost his sister. And everyone giving him a virtual hug Geography has been annihilated. You have wormholes to all of these people right now. Persistence of humans for the first time we have the ability to log our lives but we’re so busy being involved in logging our lives and looking at each other’s life logs that we log what our lives are be instead of what we want them to beIf you get nothing else from this presentation, get the idea of looking at your lives and actively developing and taking care of your second self.
  • There are benefits and deficits to this. If a link or a plus one on Facebook makes you feel important – As tech pioneer Josh Harris said, “Andy Warhol was wrong. &quot;People won’t want 15 minutes of fame in their lifetimes. People will want 15 minutes of fame every day&quot;. It’s what’s needed to feel loved and important. Time and self worth are beginning to be measured in thumbs up and interactions with your virtual self. And the other drawback is that many don’t get the time alone with their minds anymore. There’s a specific process that happens when you get to think alone by yourself. You brain can make connections internally – process things that have gone on. It’s very important time for building a concept of the self. If you don’t allow this time, how can you get to really know yourself. And kids growing up with this technology – this digital closeness may have their selves created for them, instead of creating themselves. Technology is not good or bad. It’s how it’s used. But what it’s doing now is amplifying ourselves and allowing us to meet in new ways. Those who are prone to distraction will have that tendency amplified. And those who are prone to reflection will find ways to leave their computer and find quiet.
  • Babies born today have a second self, a virtual identity even before they are born (show an image of a baby in the womb on EKG as a Facebook status update).
  • Now let’s talk about work and play.
  • In real life, the time and space between goals and accomplishments is often large. For some, it is physically impossible to achieve certain things, like purchasing a Ferrari or rising above middle management in their career path. Online gaming, especially sites like Farmville, step in to take care of that void. Whereas one doesn’t have the money, time or room for a real garden, Farmville gives you one without the backaching labor. All reality is replaced by small icons, and time is compressed so that goals and accomplishments are right next to one another. Everything has a point value and a reward. When real life takes so long to reward someone, online gaming is often a better and more enjoyable alternative. For those who spend a lot of time in reality, Foursquare is a good add-on for making the mundane exciting.
  • In real life, the time and space between goals and accomplishments is often large. For some, it is physically impossible to achieve certain things, like purchasing a Ferrari or rising above middle management in their career path. Online gaming, especially sites like Farmville, step in to take care of that void. Whereas one doesn’t have the money, time or room for a real garden, Farmville gives you one without the backaching labor. All reality is replaced by small icons, and time is compressed so that goals and accomplishments are right next to one another. Everything has a point value and a reward. When real life takes so long to reward someone, online gaming is often a better and more enjoyable alternative. For those who spend a lot of time in reality, Foursquare is a good add-on for making the mundane exciting.
  • Give a story about club penguinIn real life, the time and space between goals and accomplishments is often large. For some, it is physically impossible to achieve certain things, like purchasing a Ferrari or rising above middle management in their career path. Online gaming, especially sites like Farmville, step in to take care of that void. Whereas one doesn’t have the money, time or room for a real garden, Farmville gives you one without the backaching labor. All reality is replaced by small icons, and time is compressed so that goals and accomplishments are right next to one another. Everything has a point value and a reward. When real life takes so long to reward someone, online gaming is often a better and more enjoyable alternative. For those who spend a lot of time in reality, Foursquare is a good add-on for making the mundane exciting.
  • Now our second selves are tied to one&apos;s reality. People are now using their real names instead of fake ones. Less room to experiment with identity. Less room to change identity. More likely to act as themselves
  • The second self is becoming our primary self. We groom is as if wer were waking up in the morning. We try not to let embarrassing pictures hit the airwaves. Posting on someone’s wall, paying attention.
  • Parents and kids on facebook and why things messed up. Online and offline behavior did not match. “When we think about our behavior in public, it has always been bounded by where we are. Only people within a certain distance can see what we do. Now, this isn&apos;t strictly true”, says Paul Adams, senior user experience researcher at Google. The problem is that the social networks we&apos;re creating online don&apos;t match the social networks we already have offline.
  • Foursquare – leaving tips – so that in virtual reality people got a message that the person was bad.
  • In a reputation economy, one levels up or down after gaining or losing friends or followers. How much one levels up depends on the quality and actual connectedness of a friend or follower.On Twitter, people with similar stats can talk to each other. Again, the Internet is not giving people stats, it is making visible stats that people already have between each other, and offering the opportunity for people in different geographies and times to connect with one another based on these stats.
  • The Tamagotchi was one of the first major virtual pets to hit the market. Since it’s introduction in 1996, over 70 million Tamagotchis have been sold. The toy is simple. Children and teens feed, train and clean up after a virtual pet through a few buttons on the screen. In return, the pet grows older. Teens took to the toys in school and became obsessive about maintaining them. Why? The virtual pet on the device exhibited signs of life – it had needs, grew, and died. Each of these aspects caused toy owners to become mentally attached to them, responding to the stimulus with the correct series of button presses.
  • A world that doesn’t exist yet. A world they will build and extend and play in before they work in it.
  • We covered a lot of topics here.
  • We covered a lot of topics here. If you want to learn more, I encourage you to read Feed, by M.T.Anderson.
  • Network as villageIt’s like there are all of these people in your pocket all of the time – that at any time you can touch. If you looked at how close they are digitally – they’re this close. You can be in the middle of the desert and they will still be this close. Story about a man in japan who just learned he lost his sister. And everyone giving him a virtual hug Geography has been annihilated. You have wormholes to all of these people right now. Persistence of humans for the first time we have the ability to log our lives but we’re so busy being involved in logging our lives and looking at each other’s life logs that we log what our lives are be instead of what we want them to beIf you get nothing else from this presentation, get the idea of looking at your lives and actively developing and taking care of your second self.
  • Reducing the time and space between need and fulfillment. Information when you need it. The best ads help you live your life.
  • “netness” What is Netness? characterizes an emerging state-of-being in which connectivity isincreasingly ubiquitous… lives are increasingly entangled.The more things you connect, the better things work. Reduce clicks to get to goals Evaporate the interface. Bring content to people instead of having Them search for it. The more things you connect, the better things work. Reduce clicks to get to goals Evaporate the interface. Bring content to people instead of having Them search for it. when connectivitybecomes ubiquitouswhen systems (networks) become fieldswhen things begin tobecome entangledthe more things you connect… the better things work. the smarter they are. the safer they are. the more opportunity is created for sharing resources and collaborating.pierreteilhard de chardinin the phenomenon of man:connectivity = life isolation = death that is why all things absolutely want to be connected
  • Actions are ReducedQueries are Eliminated
  • I gave this talk, and then started building what I was talking about.
  • You don’t have to query. Information is pushed to you. The Interface is Reduced Actions are ReducedQueries are Eliminated
  • Simultaneous time also causes social punctuation, as technosocial connectivity seeps into every part of social relations.
  • Reducing check-in exhaustion.
  • If I’m not work by 9Am send my boss a text that I’ll be 15 min late. If I’m walking downtown, send a message that if I go into Gap in 15 minutes, will get 15% off. If the app knows I’m hungry it will have pre-queried information for me.
  • Children will enter into a hyperconnected world where they will begin to program it. They will use systems as playgrounds Allow them opportunities for playAnd they will create very intelligent things.
  • Speech at Warner Brothers - Growing up Cyborg

    1. 1. Growing up Cyborg<br />A brief look into the present, past and future of connected play, interaction and communication in the digital world. <br />Amber Case<br />@caseorganic<br />case@caseorganic.com<br />
    2. 2. we are all <br />cyborgs<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4. cyborg<br />an organism “to which exogenous components<br />have been added for the purpose of <br />adaptingto new environments”<br />
    5. 5. Flickr: cybertoad<br />
    6. 6. http://farm1.static.flickr.com/119/293670483_cbce23bdde_b.jpg<br />Flickr: soylentgreen23<br />
    7. 7. traditionalanthropology<br />
    8. 8. Flickr: futurestreet<br />cyborganthropology<br />
    9. 9. I. Present DayII. Youth CultureIII. A short history of the future IV. The future<br />
    10. 10. Flickr: soylentgreen23<br />I. Present Day<br />
    11. 11. the<br />automatic<br />production<br />ofspace<br />
    12. 12.
    13. 13. frictionless<br />value <br />production<br />Flickr: Ivan Walsh<br />
    14. 14. towards<br />a value <br />crisis<br />
    15. 15. Hyperlinked<br />Memories<br />
    16. 16. Persistent<br />Paleontology<br />
    17. 17. devices<br />and their <br />discontents<br />
    18. 18. devices<br />and their <br />discontents<br />
    19. 19. Panic <br />architecture<br />
    20. 20.
    21. 21. this is your<br />second self<br />
    22. 22. Maintenance<br />of the <br />second <br />self <br />
    23. 23. presentation <br />of self in<br />digital life<br />
    24. 24. ambientintimacy<br />LeisaReichelt<br />
    25. 25. Flickr: piet_musterd<br />
    26. 26. +1<br />psychological<br />effects<br />
    27. 27. II. Youth Culture<br />
    28. 28. Infants have a second self before they are even born.<br />
    29. 29. Why text messaging vs. phone calls?<br />
    30. 30. Workand Play<br />
    31. 31. Reality isn’t always fun<br />
    32. 32. Reality isn’t always fast<br />
    33. 33. Reality is +5 points!<br />
    34. 34. Reality is 5 stars!<br />
    35. 35. Accelerated Rewards<br />
    36. 36. Merging of Analog and Virtual<br />
    37. 37. The backyard is now a digital space<br />
    38. 38. Second selves become actual selves <br />
    39. 39. Social<br />grooming<br />
    40. 40. facebook and privacy <br />
    41. 41. slideshare.net/padday/the-real-life-social-network-v2<br />@padday UX at Google <br />
    42. 42. Bullying doesn’t end when school is over. <br />
    43. 43. Level Ups<br />+1 Friend<br />+1 Follower<br />
    44. 44. technosocial<br />training<br />wheels<br />
    45. 45. Kids are training for their future world<br />
    46. 46. A community that increasingly transcends time and space.<br />
    47. 47. What next?<br />
    48. 48. Feed, by M.T. Anderson<br />
    49. 49. III. A History of the future <br />
    50. 50. Self-Portrait<br />of Steve Mann with Wearable Computing Apparatus<br />1981.<br />
    51. 51. RememberThe Milk<br />Contextual Notification Systems<br />Virtual Post-It Noteswith <br />Image Processing in 1995.<br />
    52. 52. Diminished Reality<br /><ul><li>Adding your own layer onto reality
    53. 53. Replacing public messages with your own</li></li></ul><li>Evolution of Technology<br /><ul><li>Over time computing technology gets lighter and lighter
    54. 54. Components become almost invisible</li></li></ul><li>Steve Mann Today<br /><ul><li>Extremely lightweight equipment
    55. 55. Everyone will have this in their pocket</li></li></ul><li>FunctionalLocation-Based Reminder Applications - 2006<br />
    56. 56. IV. The future<br />
    57. 57. The Internet <br />is not a machine<br />
    58. 58. The Internet <br />is human<br />
    59. 59. The future of advertising ispeople. <br />Flickr: piet_musterd<br />
    60. 60. Reducing the time and space between need and fulfillment. <br />
    61. 61. Connectivity increases <br />opportunity.<br />
    62. 62. Relevant information should be pushed to users, instead of having to seek it out.<br />
    63. 63. Reality should unfold like a videogame.<br />Autosubscribing Geo-local RSS feeds<br />Notifications when you enter a quadrant of Portland<br />
    64. 64. You Schedule a Meeting<br />You say 3pm.<br />You think he’ll show up precisely at 3.<br />
    65. 65. Uncertainty Ensues<br />15 minutes before, you start getting anxious.<br />He could show up any time between now and 3:30!<br />
    66. 66. Co-location Negotiation<br />These redundant messages can be eliminated if you know where someone is.<br />
    67. 67. Proximal Notification<br />
    68. 68. <ul><li>Doesn’t update as often as desired
    69. 69. Another device to charge every day </li></ul>Boost Mobile Phone Running Instamapper<br />
    70. 70.
    71. 71. Home Automation<br />When you check in to your house, your lights turn on!<br />When you leave the house, your lights turn off!<br />
    72. 72.
    73. 73.
    74. 74.
    75. 75.
    76. 76.
    77. 77.
    78. 78.
    79. 79. AutomaticCheck-ins<br />
    80. 80. Geonotes<br />Location-Based Reminders<br />
    81. 81. Flickr: awnisALAN<br />Location-Based Campaigns<br />If done intelligently, relevant information sent to users. <br />
    82. 82. Trigger-Based Campaigns<br />Set triggers based on an action the user has taken. <br />
    83. 83. Don’t Eat That!<br /><ul><li>Made by Reid Beels at Geoloqi Hackathon
    84. 84. Sends users notifications of restaurants nearby their location that are below a threshold of cleanliness. </li></li></ul><li>your phonebecomes a remote control for reality.<br />
    85. 85. The best technologyis invisibleIt should get out of the way and connect people.<br />
    86. 86. Thank you.<br />Amber Case<br />@caseorganic<br />case@caseorganic.com<br />
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