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Principles of Effective Design:Joshua Tree Epiphany & CRAP<br />Edited & adapted by Barbara B. Nixon<br />Georgia Southern...
The Joshua Tree Epiphany<br />
CRAPcontrast, repetition, alignment, proximity<br />Major sources: Designing Visual Interfaces, Mullet & Sano, Prentice Ha...
CRAP<br />Contrast <br />Repetition <br />Alignment <br />Proximity <br />Robin Williams Non-Designers Design Book, Peachp...
CRAP<br />Contrast<br />make different things different<br />brings out dominant elements<br />mutes lesser elements<br />...
CRAP<br />Contrast <br />Repetition <br />repeat design throughout the interface<br />consistency<br />creates unity <br /...
CRAP<br />Contrast <br />Repetition<br />Alignment<br />creates a visual flow<br />visually connects elements<br />Proximi...
CRAP<br />Contrast <br />Repetition <br />Alignment <br />Proximity<br />groups related elements<br />separates unrelated ...
Wheredoesyoureye go?<br />CRAP combines to give you cues of how to read the graphic<br />title<br />subtext<br />three poi...
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Principles Of Effective Design

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Presentation to accompany a discussion of effective design principles in Prof. Barbara Nixon's PR Publications class. Based on a PPT by Saul Greenberg

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  • NOTE: The original slide deck by Saul Greenberg. Permission was granted to use this for non-commercial purposes as long as general credit to Saul Greenberg is clearly maintained. Warning: some material in this deck is used from other sources without permission. Credit to the original source is given if it is known.
  • Image Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/40871351@N00/407364383/The Joshua Tree Epiphanyby Robin WilliamsFound at http://pushingposes.blogspot.com/2008/03/perception-is-reality.html Once upon a time, Robin received a tree identifying book where you could match a tree up with its name by looking at its picture. Robin decided to go out and identify the trees in the neighborhood. Before she went out, she read through part of the book. The first tree in the book was the Joshua tree because it only took two clues to identify it.Now the Joshua tree is a really weird-looking tree and she looked at that picture and said to herself, "Oh, we don’t have that kind of tree in Northern California. That is a weird-looking tree. I would know if I saw that tree, and I’ve never seen one before."So she took the book and went outside. Her parents lived in a cul-de-sac of six homes. Four of those homes had Joshua trees in the front yard. She had lived in that house for thirteen years, and she had never seen a Joshua tree.She took a walk around the block - at least 80 percent of the homes had Joshua trees in the front yards. And she had sworn she had never seen one before!The moral of the story? Once Robin was conscious of the tree, once she could name it, she saw could see it everywhere. Which is exactly my point. Once you can name something, you’re conscious of it. You have power over it. You own it. You’re in control.-- end quote ---
  • Transcript of "Principles Of Effective Design"

    1. 1. Principles of Effective Design:Joshua Tree Epiphany & CRAP<br />Edited & adapted by Barbara B. Nixon<br />Georgia Southern University<br />
    2. 2. The Joshua Tree Epiphany<br />
    3. 3. CRAPcontrast, repetition, alignment, proximity<br />Major sources: Designing Visual Interfaces, Mullet & Sano, Prentice Hall / Robin Williams Non-Designers Design Book, Peachpit Press<br />Slide deck by Saul Greenberg. Permission is granted to use this for non-commercial purposes as long as general credit to Saul Greenberg is clearly maintained. Warning: some material in this deck is used from other sources without permission. Credit to the original source is given if it is known.<br />
    4. 4.
    5. 5. CRAP<br />Contrast <br />Repetition <br />Alignment <br />Proximity <br />Robin Williams Non-Designers Design Book, Peachpit Press<br />
    6. 6. CRAP<br />Contrast<br />make different things different<br />brings out dominant elements<br />mutes lesser elements<br />creates dynamism<br />Repetition <br />Alignment <br />Proximity <br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />Robin Williams Non-Designers Design Book, Peachpit Press<br />
    7. 7. CRAP<br />Contrast <br />Repetition <br />repeat design throughout the interface<br />consistency<br />creates unity <br />Alignment <br />Proximity<br />1<br />3<br />2<br />4<br />Robin Williams Non-Designers Design Book, Peachpit Press<br />
    8. 8. CRAP<br />Contrast <br />Repetition<br />Alignment<br />creates a visual flow<br />visually connects elements<br />Proximity<br />1<br />3<br />2<br />4<br />Robin Williams Non-Designers Design Book, Peachpit Press<br />
    9. 9. CRAP<br />Contrast <br />Repetition <br />Alignment <br />Proximity<br />groups related elements<br />separates unrelated ones<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />Robin Williams Non-Designers Design Book, Peachpit Press<br />
    10. 10. Wheredoesyoureye go?<br />CRAP combines to give you cues of how to read the graphic<br />title<br />subtext<br />three points<br />main point<br />sub point<br />Robin Williams Non-Designers Design Book, Peachpit Press<br />
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