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MPI Presentation on Gameification DeMarle

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Presentation for MPI on strategies from games and social media to engage community.

Presentation for MPI on strategies from games and social media to engage community.

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  • Ann:\nHi I’m Ann DeMarle, a professor at Champlain College and the director of our Emergent Media Center and our Master of Fine Arts in Emergent Media\nLauren: and I’m Lauren Nishikawa the project manager and creative director at the Emergent Media Center.\nAnn: and we’re here to discuss How to Gameify Your Meeting Portfolio - how game principles can create engagement for your meetings and events.\n\n
  • Lauren: With the advent of newer, cheaper technologies, barriers to entry in communications have dropped. It has become increasingly easier for organizations - or individuals - to put a message out into the world and broadcast it globally.\n
  • Ann: This is due in part to Moore’s law, named for Roger Moore the co-founder of Intel Corporation. Moore’s Law describes the explosive, exponential capabilities of computing technologies - computers, mobile devices, etc - capabilities due to improvements in integrated circuits.\n\n
  • Futurist Ray Kurzweil calls Moore’s Law the Fifth Paradigm. Kurzweil’s paradigm’s are technological progress that impact culture. \nQuoting Kurzweil “Computing devices have been consistently multiplying in power (per unit of time) from the mechanical calculating devices used in the 1890 U.S. Census, to Turing's relay-based "Robinson" machine that cracked the Nazi enigma code, to the CBS vacuum tube computer that predicted the election of Eisenhower, to the transistor-based machines used in the first space launches, to the integrated-circuit-based personal computer which I used to dictate (and automatically transcribe) this essay.”\nBecause of Moore’s Law, Kurzweil notes that computer SPEED doubled every three years between 1910 and 1950, doubled every two years between 1950 and 1966, and is now doubling every year. What this means for all of us is we benefit from increasing speed for creating, participating, playing on our computers.\n
  • Kurzweil has pointed out that the emergence of the Internet into a worldwide phenomenon follows a similar exponential path and was readily predictable by examining the sky rocketing trend data.\n“...nothing was happening until the mid ‘90s when seemingly out of nowhere, the world wide web & email exploded into view.” \n\nAt the same time as computing speed increases we are getting away from the tangle of wires in our cities and in our lives through wireless communication, the power of which is doubling every 10 to 11 months. \nWhat this means to us is the increasing ability to connect – to info, groups, individuals, anytime.\n
  • Lauren: But in this hyper-saturated, networked world, getting attention and simple connectivity is no longer enough to build an audience. The audience is no longer looking for a single message, catch phrase or memorable tune. Connecting is the beginning - but just as easily and quickly, it can become the ending point.\n\n
  • What today’s audience is looking for is engagement. What today’s innovative organizations are looking for is interaction with the audience and motivating the individual to action. Both are looking to create and become part of community. Community implies give and take. For meeting and event organizers, community enables relationships that extend before, during and after events. \n
  • Ann: Jane McGonigal is a researcher and Alternate Reality Game or ARG designer who created “The Lost Ring” sponsored by McDonalds as a lead-in to the Beijing Olympics. The Lost Ring was a game played live for 6 months in 2008 by thousands of people across six continents. Players were trying to find a fictional Lost Olympic Ring. Clues were posted through blogs, via email, instant messaging and through twitter. \nThe Lost Ring is a good example of new ways of reaching large audiences and engaging them through games. McDonald’s spokesperson and chief global marketing officer, Mary Dillion, said of the project “Our goal is really about strengthening our bond with the global youth culture”. \nMcGonigal has dubbed this new reality of engaging the individual as the “economy of engagement”. She has written “In the economy of engagement, it is less and less important to compete for attention, and more and more important to compete for things like brain cycles and interactive bandwidth.”\n\n
  • “Participation Bandwidth” refers to the increasing amount of online spaces and tools for creating communities - and our limited time to participate. As it becomes cheaper and easier for organizations to share messages it has become increasingly more difficult for the individual to differentiate and to remain loyal. \nThe easier to enter groups, the more difficult it is to sustain networked communities. \n
  • Consider day to day life and the amount of time available for staying in touch with our personal communities - our parents, children, siblings, friends, and colleagues. In our daily life, as in our online life, how many groups can an individual keep track of or be active in before downsizing - neglecting some and deleting others? \nIn Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations, Clay Shirky states “With many more possible groups competing for the average individual’s time, the speed with which a group can become unglued has also increased.”\n
  • Now consider the online space. In 2010 Americans spent on average 32 hours a month online - roughly an hour a day. ( http://www.comscoredatamine.com/2011/01/average-time-spent-online-per-u-s-visitor-in-2010/ ). As more and more organizations utilize social media for mass media purposes, truly participatory and collaborative media are becoming the holy grail of engagement. \n\nHow are people behaving on line, how do they participate and collaborate? This Business Week chart of data from Forester Research illustrates key online behaviors for differing age groups. What becomes apparent is that the generations that grew up with technology - the digital natives are very active - joining, sharing, creating, reviewing, tagging, and observing. Their efforts influence one another and extend beyond their age groups spilling into older demographics. Non-digital native generations - the digital adopters or TV generation - tend more toward consumptive behavior - following information shared by others but also comment on online content.\nhttp://images.businessweek.com/mz/07/24/0724_6insiid_a.gif\n
  • Due to the easy linkages that can be shared across the internet, messages spread across generations and platforms influencing net behavior. For example due to the popularity and ease of distribution through Facebook, online social games such as Farmville surprised the traditional game industry by growing by 33% in 2010 to $14.1 billion. At the same time Facebook games contributed to building the fastest growing demographic in games—women over 18. According to the Entertainment Software Association 40% of all game players are women over 18. Women are drawn to the casual nature of Facebook games - pick-up, put down and pick-up again.\nhttp://www.gamesbrief.com/2010/06/the-online-games-market-was-worth-15-billion-in-2009-and-will-grow-to-20-billion-in-2010/\n
  • Social networks and games are proving to be a very powerful pull for online participation. June 2010 a Nielsen report showed that social networks and online games were the dominant forms of internet activity. According to Nielsen analyst Dave Martin “Despite the almost unlimited nature of what you can do on the web, 40 percent of U.S. online time is spent on just three activities – social networking, playing games and emailing leaving a whole lot of other sectors fighting for a declining share of the online pie.” \nLooking closely at the Nielsen report, the top five online activities share in common the behavior of active feedback. In this “engagement economy”, truly the wisdom of the crowd translates into the action of the team. The first step to harnessing individual "participation bandwidth" is to create active avenues for user experience. This is where the expertise of “fun engineers” comes in. Crafting experiences is their domain. \n
  • To begin to think like a “fun engineer” or game designer it helps to recall or observe child play. Children are engaged in play for hours, days, weeks. While playing, children enter a state of flow. Proposed by Mihály Csíkszentmihályi, (MEE-hye CHEEK-sent-mə-HYE-ee) , flow is a state of mind wherein a person is fully immersed and focused on a process or activity. Other activities that reproduce flow would be any immersive sport activity or artistic production such as skiing or drawing. According to Csíkszentmihályi (CHEEK-sent-mə-HYE-ee), flow represents the ultimate in harnessing the emotions in the service of performing and learning.\n\nNow take a minute to remember some of the games you played as a youth.\nPAUSE\n\n
  • Here is a quick listing from my childhood. You may recognize games from your youth. Child’s play is useful for understanding modern electronic games. \n
  • Lauren: Ann’s list neatly correlates to modern games; more specifically, these forms of childhood play become the basis of modern day game genres. Puzzles and card games are forms of strategy games such as - Tetris, Myst, or Risk\nAction games are games of prowess well represented in games such as Mario Cart or Wii Sports.\nRole playing games can be recognized in the popular Guitar Hero and Rock Band. \nHowever many modern electronic games cross genres. The popular Facebook game, Farmville for instance is a game of strategy, role-playing and also is about investigating external worlds and systems.\n
  • The list is also useful for distinguishing between Games and Simulations. Both games and simulations allow the mind to enter a flow state. Both require a suspension of belief - a release from mundane reality. When we enter a game we enter “the Magic Circle” of trust in the creator or host of the experience. Trust is established as long as the experience follows pre-defined parameters or rules. The experience can be broken by the host, design, or other players, thereby destroying trust in the game system or experience.\n
  • The list is also useful for distinguishing between Games and Simulations. Both games and simulations allow the mind to enter a flow state. Both require a suspension of belief - a release from mundane reality. When we enter a game we enter “the Magic Circle” of trust in the creator or host of the experience. Trust is established as long as the experience follows pre-defined parameters or rules. The experience can be broken by the host, design, or other players, thereby destroying trust in the game system or experience.\n
  • Games and simulations have pretty clear differences. Simulations are open ended and investigative, without a pre-determined outcome. Simulations are data driven, and they may be tinkered with, as in virtual worlds such as Second Life, but overall they do not require human participants to continue or to reach an end state. Simulations are often used as predictive tools for events such as weather forecasting and global warming.\nGames on the other hand require goals and provide the participant with choice. To enable a participant to stay engaged and reach goals, designers put in place a system to guide the player.\n\n
  • The game system allows the player to enter the Magic Circle. To do so a game first requires pre-determined rules and player roles. What side is the player on, what are they allowed to do or not do, and what is the central challenge or conflict? There needs to be an ultimate goal to the play that is reached by overcoming obstacles. “Toys” are incorporated into games and are tools or places for investigation. Built off of simulations, they allow the player the opportunity to customize, problem solve, & achieve mastery. Puzzles, mini-games, vehicles, and implements such as racing cars or swords are examples of game “toys”. Rewards and scores help the player keep track of their performance and motivate them to achieve more. Games balance difficulty of play against time to master - balancing frustration levels against boredom. Fun is the outcome of this balance.\n\n\n
  • When children play games they are constantly adjusting and modifying the rules and the game characters or roles. When their game gets out-of-balance and seems weighted unfairly towards one player, conflict arises. When a player of an electronic game discovers that a game is weighted unfairly or that the difficulty is not in line with the achievement or rewards, the player often loses interest and quits the game. Games keep their player engaged by adjusting difficulty upwards in line with the mastery the player achieves through repetition. This is called in game lingo “leveling up”.\n\n
  • Ann: Games are integrating into other platforms and moving beyond the computer to be applied to a number of business activities consider:\nFour Square - its a mobile location indicator application - It awards Mayorships and badges to allow the player to stick with Four Square while discovering the apps’ utility.\nFarmville - utilizes the community aspect of FB in order for players to “level-up”, Farmville calls on players’ innate sense of cooperation & competition\nWeight Watchers motivates its members through a system of rewards awarded as members achieve their goals by following dietary and behavior rules\nThis illustration is from the Tipp-Ex marketing campaign launched this Fall It went viral through a combination of Facebook and Youtube.\nFacebook users shared the Youtube link. The Youtube video began with a video story of a bear about to attack a camper and the viewer of the video. Borrowing an idea from the Choose Your Own Adventure books and text-based computer games, the viewer was asked to fill in the blank in response to the question “A hunter blanks a bear.” This convention allowed the viewer to submit multiple solutions and get an array of engaging and funny video responses for participating.\n http://mashable.com/2010/07/13/game-mechanics-business/\n
  • Applying game strategies to business goals are successful because they call on our human-ness. As Mark Metris president of Digital Chocolate - a casual, social game company - has stated “Games have the potential to tap into the full range of human emotions and motivate a wide range of behaviors.”\nThat’s the value proposition of utilizing game mechanics - motivating behaviors. To engage the audience, choose specific behaviors defined to support the organization’s goals, and then plan games that will motivate people to reach those goals. \nSid Meier, developer of the Civilization game franchise, defines a game as “a series of meaningful choices.” People will naturally explore the choices you give them if they find them worthwhile. Motivate and provide feedback by using rewards to teach the audience how to accomplish the goal you set. \n\n
  • Regardless of the type of game being designed - online, mobile, live - a few key principles will help: \n Define the goal for the player that supports your product or service\n Assign roles (behaviors) and utilize community involvement\n Drive behavior through awarding points, badges, levels, and leader boards\n Layer participation by offering leveled tasks: beginner, middle, master\n Balance difficulty from short term to long-term\n Align the largest rewards with most difficult tasks matched to project goal\n For sustained engagement: the experience must be dynamic - feed the system constantly - add, test, and refine.\n\nhttp://mashable.com/2010/07/13/game-mechanics-business/\n http://leefblog.com/2010/12/adult-learning-theory-in-games-and-simulations/\n
  • Lauren: Let’s imagine a game that might be used in the event industry.\n\nWe start by setting a goal for the game experience: Here, to simply build an online community for an event.\n\nWe then identify behaviors that the player would engage in to support that goal. Here, these include joining the group; sharing profile information; participating in online discussions via posting comments or uploading photos; returning to the site and following its development; sharing with friends; and ultimately attending the event. Some of these behaviors could extend beyond the event as well, but we’ll focus on promotion leading up to the event.\n\nJoin, get other people to join, attend, participate online and in person\n
  • Once the behaviors to be encouraged are well defined, we can start to incorporate them into the mechanics and rewards of the game. One of the most basic forms of positive feedback in a game are points. These are best tied to tasks that should be easy to accomplish, such as joining the group online, and other actions that you want to be repeated often, like participating in discussions, returning to the site, and sharing with friends.\n\nBadges can be awarded for milestones in the point system, as well as more significant actions, like sharing profile information, participating in a certain number of discussions, or convincing a large number of friends to join the site.\n\nStatus can also be given to those players that are most actively engaged in the game and hitting the largest accomplishments: those that are participating daily might be identified as leaders, those driving discussion could be provided an opportunity to meet in-person or through private chat with a keynote speaker, and those registered to the live event might be given special identifiers or coupons for a product or service integrated into the event or located nearby.\n\nThe key to a game system like this is that new challenges need to be added continually to keep audience coming back to the experience. If those additions and refinements are based on user feedback, they are likely to be even more engaging.\n
  • You can have any variety of goals and behaviors linked to a number of game mechanics and rewards. But ultimately, there is one unifying goal for designers.\nThis quote captures that goal well, and it comes from James Paul Gee, a leading research in the field of linguistics, education, literacy and games; he has stated “Game designers can make worlds where people can have meaningful new experiences, experiences that their places in life would never allow them to have or even experiences no human being has ever had before. These experiences have the potential to make people smarter and more thoughtful.”\n
  • Ann: With game design strategies this description applies equally to the event or meeting industry. Designing experience for community building and active participation!\n
  • We will answer your questions\nThank you for attending, if you have any questions you can contact us\nAnd now we’ll turn it over to Courtney.\n

Transcript

  • 1. Gameify Your MeetingPortfolio: How game principles can createengagement for meetings and eventsAnn DeMarleAssociate Professor, DirectorEmergent Media Center at Champlain College demarle@champlain.eduLauren NishikawaProject ManagerEmergent Media Center at Champlain College lnishikawa@champlain.eduJanuary 2011
  • 2. Moore’s Law: “the Fifth Paradigm” computer speed now doubling every yearspeed
  • 3. Moore’s Law: “the Fifth Paradigm” computer speed now doubling every yearspeed
  • 4. Emergence of the Internet doubling every 10 to 11 months“...nothing washappening until themid ‘90s whenseemingly out ofnowhere, the worldwide web & emailexploded intoview.”www.kurzweilai.net/articles/art0134.htmlconnectivity
  • 5. Getting attention isno longer enough.
  • 6. ing theE ng ag l to ua ivid key. ind tio n is ac
  • 7. a ndw idth ipati on B Pa rtic “...it is less and less im portant to compete for attention, and moreand more important to competefor things like brain cy cles andinteractive bandwidth. — Jane McGonigal, “En gagement Economy” http://janemcgonigal.co m/
  • 8. a ndw idth ipati on BPa rtic
  • 9. “With many more possible groups competing for the average individual’s time, the speed with which a group can become unglued has also increased.”—Clay Shirky, “Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations”
  • 10. http://images.businessweek.com/mz/07/24/0724_6insiid_a.gif
  • 11. http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/what-americans-do-online-social-media-and-games-dominate-activity/
  • 12. FlowMihály CsíkszentmihályiStart with child’s play,think back to earliest play...What was on your playlist?
  • 13. What’s your playlist?• Puzzles, cards & board games• Action—sports such as baseball, soccer, basketball, racing, skating, tennis...• Make-up games: • Group invention—create the story, layout the environment, collect the props, act • Mimicry of known—teachers, mothers, doctors, builders...• Investigation of external worlds— camping, exploring...• Investigating systems & mechanics: • Doll houses, train sets, cars & trucks, erector sets... • Hobbies
  • 14. Game Genres• Strategy: Puzzles, cards & board games• Prowess: Action—sports such as baseball, soccer, basketball, racing, skating, tennis...• Role playing: Make-up games: • Group invention—create the story, layout the environment, collect the props, act • Mimicry of known—teachers, mothers, doctors, builders...• Investigation of external worlds— camping, exploring...• Investigating systems & mechanics: • Doll houses, train sets, cars & trucks, erector sets... • Hobbies
  • 15. The Magic Circle• Strategy: Puzzles & Board games• Prowess: Action—sports such as baseball, soccer, basketball, racing, skating, tennis...• Role playing: Make-up games: • Group invention—modeled after media—create the story, layout the environment, collect the props • Mimicry of known—teachers, mothers, doctors, builders...• Investigation of external worlds— camping, exploring...• Investigating systems & mechanics: • Doll houses, train sets, cars & trucks, erector sets... • Hobbies
  • 16. The Magic Circle• Strategy: Puzzles & Board games• Prowess: Action—sports such as baseball, soccer, basketball, racing, skating, tennis...Games• Role playing: Make-up games: • Group invention—modeled after media—create the story, layout the environment, collect the props • Mimicry of known—teachers, mothers, doctors, builders...• Investigation of external worlds— camping, exploring...• Investigating systems & mechanics: • Doll houses, train sets, cars & trucks, erector sets... • Hobbies
  • 17. The Magic Circle• Strategy: Puzzles & Board games• Prowess: Action—sports such as baseball, soccer, basketball, racing, skating, tennis...Games• Role playing: Make-up games: • Group invention—modeled after media—create the story, layout theSimulations environment, collect the props • Mimicry of known—teachers, mothers, doctors, builders...• Investigation of external worlds— camping, exploring...• Investigating systems & mechanics: • Doll houses, train sets, cars & trucks, erector sets... • Hobbies
  • 18. • Strategy: Puzzles & Board games• Prowess: Action—sports such as baseball, soccer, basketball, racing, skating, tennis...• Role playing: Make-up games: • Group invention—modeled after media —create the story, layout the environment, collect the props • Mimicry of known—teachers, mothers, doctors, builders...Games: goal orientedSimulations: investigative• Investigation of other worlds—camping, exploring...• Investigating systems & mechanics:• Doll houses, train sets, cars & trucks, erector sets...• Hobbies
  • 19. Game Systems:Engagement & Participation• Rules• Player roles• Incorporate “toys”• Central conflict or obstacle• Multiple pathways to goal• Levels of difficulty and achievement• Balance difficulty against time (frustrating vs boring)• Rewards• Goals: Win-lose state
  • 20. Gameification: Games Meet Social Networks& Leave the Box• FourSquare: local based motivation• Farmville: depending on community• Weight Watchers: Magic Circle & rewards• Tipp-Ex Bear: YouTube participation
  • 21. “Games have the potential to tap into thefull range of human emotions and motivatea wide range of behaviors.” —Mark Metis, president Digital Chocolate
  • 22. Creating Successful Routes for Participation• Define the goal for the player that supports the product or service• Assign roles (behaviors), utilize community• Drive behavior through awarding points, badges, levels, leader boards• Layer participation by offering leveled tasks: beginner, middle, master• Balance difficulty: short term—long-term• Align largest rewards with most difficult tasks—project goal• For sustained engagement: feed the system constantly add, test, and refine.
  • 23. Goal: build an onlinecommunity for an event Player Behaviors: • Join group • Share profile information • Participate in discussions: post comments, upload photos • Return to site, follow • Share with friends • Attend event
  • 24. Goal: build an online community for an event Mechanics: Point Rewards • Join group • Participate in discussions: post comments, upload photos • Return to site, follow • Share with friends Mechanics: Badges • Point milestones • Share profile information • Participate in discussions: post comments, upload photos • Accomplishments like 100 friends join site Status • Participating daily • Leading discussions: meet with keynote • Register for event: coupons Feed the system constantly add, test, and refine
  • 25. “Game designers can make worlds wherepeople can have meaningful newexperiences, experiences that their placesin life would never allow them to have oreven experiences no human being has everhad before. These experiences have thepotential to make people smarter and morethoughtful.” —James Paul Gee, “Learning by Design: Good Video Games as Learning Machines”
  • 26. ting & event constructMe e pla nners ev worlds where“Game designers can makeentspeople can have meaningful newexperiences, experiences that their placesin life would never allow them to have oreven experiences no human being has everhad before. These experiences have thepotential to make people smarter and morethoughtful.” —James Paul Gee, “Learning by Design: Good Video Games as Learning Machines”
  • 27. Gameify Your MeetingPortfolio: How game principles can createengagement for meetings and eventsAnn DeMarleAssociate Professor, DirectorEmergent Media Center at Champlain College demarle@champlain.eduLauren NishikawaProject ManagerEmergent Media Center at Champlain College lnishikawa@champlain.eduJanuary 2011