Time & Space                Annilihated:                Innovation, Communication                & Society               ©...
Saturday, April 14, 2012
Saturday, April 14, 2012
Saturday, April 14, 2012
Saturday, April 14, 2012
Saturday, April 14, 2012
Saturday, April 14, 2012
Saturday, April 14, 2012
Saturday, April 14, 2012
Saturday, April 14, 2012
• Communication’s history is a story of Few to the Many.Saturday, April 14, 2012
• Communication’s history is a story of Few to the Many.               • Technological Innovation removes Boundaries.Satur...
• Communication’s history is a story of Few to the Many.               • Technological Innovation removes Boundaries.     ...
The history of                           communication is a                           story of                           F...
Coalescing Community                              Image: Prof saxx , Photography of Lascaux Animal Painting, Feb 2006Satur...
Coalescing Community           “The shaman’s vision gives meaning to the           hunting and killing of animals on which...
Coalescing Community           “He has faced death, come out the other           side, and is now psychologically prepared...
1.Sumerians & Egyptians 3000 B.C.E.                           2.Chinese 1300 B.C.E.                           3.Mexican In...
1.Sumerians & Egyptians 3000 B.C.E.                                     2.Chinese 1300 B.C.E.                             ...
1.Sumerians & Egyptians 3000 B.C.E.                                     2.Chinese 1300 B.C.E.                             ...
Maintaining OrderSaturday, April 14, 2012
Maintaining Order                      “Ancient writing’s main function was to                        “facilitate the ensl...
Mycenaean Linear B (1400 B.C.E.) to                                    Classical Greek (740 B.C.E.)                       ...
Mycenaean Linear B (1400 B.C.E.) to                                            Classical Greek (740 B.C.E.)               ...
Mycenaean Linear B (1400 B.C.E.) to                                                    Classical Greek (740 B.C.E.)       ...
Hierarchal power                           Image: Jovhannes manuscript of 1053 C.E. (Ms. 3793). At the Matenadaran in Yere...
Hierarchal power    “The patterns of textual survivals were shaped by their usefulness        to the severely constricted ...
Technological Innovation removes Boundaries.Saturday, April 14, 2012
Replication & Revolution                               Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Metal_movable_type.jpgSatu...
““...allowed scientists of all fields to compare their                           findings with others. Scientific theories st...
“The surface of the earth will be networked with wire, and            every wire will be a nerve. The earth will become a ...
“The surface of the earth will be networked with wire, and           every wire will be a nerve. The earth will become a h...
Time and Space is Now AnnihilatedSaturday, April 14, 2012
“" Just imagine what could have happened if the passing            success of the Lyons silk workers insurrection had been...
Global Mass Transmission “The eventual total cost of the commercial was $250,000 - an unheard of price in     1971 for an ...
Global Mass Transmission “The eventual total cost of the commercial was $250,000 - an unheard of price in     1971 for an ...
Emergence of the Internet                                     “...nothing was happening until                             ...
Computational Media:                           • Encyclopedic,                           • Procedural,                    ...
Shifting Paradigms—Participation                           Broadcast Media + Digital Media = Personal Media               ...
Shifting Paradigms—Participation                                       Mass Media       Personal Media             Main In...
Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
http://www.boingboing.net/                                     Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, A...
Image: http://images.businessweek.com/mz/07/24/0724_6insiid_a.gifSaturday, April 14, 2012
Multiple inputs require Reflection and Choice.Saturday, April 14, 2012
PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
PoeticSaturday, April 14, 2012
PoeticSaturday, April 14, 2012
PoeticSaturday, April 14, 2012
PoeticSaturday, April 14, 2012
Career Oriented: Christina Rosalie                            http://www.mytopography.com/2012/03/28/small-rituals-holding...
Career Oriented: Christina Rosalie                            http://www.mytopography.com/2012/03/28/small-rituals-holding...
Career Oriented: Christina Rosalie                            http://www.mytopography.com/2012/03/28/small-rituals-holding...
Community Outreach: Steve Keetle, Bernie SandersSaturday, April 14, 2012
Community Outreach: Steve Keetle, Bernie SandersSaturday, April 14, 2012
Activism: Arab Spring, SOPA                           http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/14/tunisian-president-flees-...
Activism: Arab Spring, SOPA                           http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/14/tunisian-president-flees-...
“It has shown me that it is not about how good your soccer                           skills are. It is about attitude, tea...
Global Citizenship: Ronny Edrie                           http://www.middleeastvoices.com/2012/03/israelis-iranians-on-fac...
Global Citizenship: Ronny Edrie                           http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=mYjuUoEiv...
Global Citizenship: Ronny Edrie                           http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=mYjuUoEiv...
Global Citizenship: Piotr Czerski                           http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/we-the-w...
disregarding the ones which do not seem credible. We select, we filter, we                           remember, and we are ...
disregarding the ones which do not seem credible. We select, we filter, we                           remember, and we are ...
disregarding the ones which do not seem credible. We select, we filter, we                                     remember, a...
Worth Reading/Experiencing       •       French Ministry of Culture, “Lascaux:Visit the Grotto”, http://               www...
Time & Space                Annilihated:                Innovation, Communication                & Society               ©...
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Time & Space Annihilated: Innovation, Communication & Society

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Presentation fo panel on the impacts of digital media on society. Historical overview of how innovation in communication have corresponded to changing societal relationships.

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Time & Space Annihilated: Innovation, Communication & Society

  1. 1. Time & Space Annilihated: Innovation, Communication & Society ©Ann DeMarle demarle@champlain.edu Champlain College Emergent Media Center Master of Fine Arts in Emergent MediaSaturday, April 14, 2012
  2. 2. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  3. 3. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  4. 4. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  5. 5. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  6. 6. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  7. 7. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  8. 8. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  9. 9. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  10. 10. Saturday, April 14, 2012
  11. 11. • Communication’s history is a story of Few to the Many.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  12. 12. • Communication’s history is a story of Few to the Many. • Technological Innovation removes Boundaries.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  13. 13. • Communication’s history is a story of Few to the Many. • Technological Innovation removes Boundaries. • Multiple inputs require Reflection and Choice.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  14. 14. The history of communication is a story of Few to the Many.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  15. 15. Coalescing Community Image: Prof saxx , Photography of Lascaux Animal Painting, Feb 2006Saturday, April 14, 2012
  16. 16. Coalescing Community “The shaman’s vision gives meaning to the hunting and killing of animals on which these societies depend.” —Karen Armstrong, “The Case for God” Image: Prof saxx , Photography of Lascaux Animal Painting, Feb 2006Saturday, April 14, 2012
  17. 17. Coalescing Community “He has faced death, come out the other side, and is now psychologically prepared to risk his life for his people.” —Karen Armstrong, “The Case for God” Image: Luc-Henri Fage, "Borneo, Memory of the Caves", 1999, http://www.kalimanthrope.com/Borneo_Memory_of_the_Caves.htmlSaturday, April 14, 2012
  18. 18. 1.Sumerians & Egyptians 3000 B.C.E. 2.Chinese 1300 B.C.E. 3.Mexican Indians 600 B.C.E. Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SumerSaturday, April 14, 2012
  19. 19. 1.Sumerians & Egyptians 3000 B.C.E. 2.Chinese 1300 B.C.E. 3.Mexican Indians 600 B.C.E. Maintaining Order Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SumerSaturday, April 14, 2012
  20. 20. 1.Sumerians & Egyptians 3000 B.C.E. 2.Chinese 1300 B.C.E. 3.Mexican Indians 600 B.C.E. Maintaining Order Restricted to scribes employed by king or temple for: 1. propaganda, 2. myths, 3. clerical records. Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SumerSaturday, April 14, 2012
  21. 21. Maintaining OrderSaturday, April 14, 2012
  22. 22. Maintaining Order “Ancient writing’s main function was to “facilitate the enslavement of other human beings.”” —Claude Levi-Strauss —Jared Diamond, “Guns, Germs, and Steel: the Fate of Human Societies”Saturday, April 14, 2012
  23. 23. Mycenaean Linear B (1400 B.C.E.) to Classical Greek (740 B.C.E.) Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dipylon_Inscription.JPGSaturday, April 14, 2012
  24. 24. Mycenaean Linear B (1400 B.C.E.) to Classical Greek (740 B.C.E.) Poetic Expression Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dipylon_Inscription.JPGSaturday, April 14, 2012
  25. 25. Mycenaean Linear B (1400 B.C.E.) to Classical Greek (740 B.C.E.) Poetic Expression the dancers now d ances lightly he “Whoever of shall ge t me as his prize.” Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dipylon_Inscription.JPGSaturday, April 14, 2012
  26. 26. Hierarchal power Image: Jovhannes manuscript of 1053 C.E. (Ms. 3793). At the Matenadaran in Yerevan, Armenia. Photo by Raffi Kojian.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  27. 27. Hierarchal power “The patterns of textual survivals were shaped by their usefulness to the severely constricted literate group of Christians.” —http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illuminated_manuscript Image: Jovhannes manuscript of 1053 C.E. (Ms. 3793). At the Matenadaran in Yerevan, Armenia. Photo by Raffi Kojian.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  28. 28. Technological Innovation removes Boundaries.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  29. 29. Replication & Revolution Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Metal_movable_type.jpgSaturday, April 14, 2012
  30. 30. ““...allowed scientists of all fields to compare their findings with others. Scientific theories started to form on a large scale because more supportive evidence was accessible. In mathematics, a field which relies heavily on uniform systems, mathematicians were able to build upon other works as they became available.”” —Welch, Killeen, Davidson, ”Inventions That Changed History” Ch 1, http://www.scientiareview.org/pdfs/126.pdf Replication & Revolution Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Metal_movable_type.jpgSaturday, April 14, 2012
  31. 31. “The surface of the earth will be networked with wire, and every wire will be a nerve. The earth will become a huge animal with 10 million hands, and in every hand a pen to record whatever the directing soul may dictate! No limit can be assigned to the value of the invention.” —Sydney Morse to his brother —Johanna Neuman: "The Medias Impact on International Affairs, Then and Now," Time and Space is Now Annihilated Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_First_Telegraph.jpgSaturday, April 14, 2012
  32. 32. “The surface of the earth will be networked with wire, and every wire will be a nerve. The earth will become a huge “We are in 10 million hands, and in everymagnetic to animal with great haste to construct a hand a pen telegraph from Maine to Texas, but Maine and Texas, it record whatever the directing soul may dictate! No limit may be assigned to the important to communicate."” can be, have nothing value of the invention.” — Henry David Thoreau —Sydney Morse to his brother —Johanna Neuman: "The Medias Impact on International Affairs, Then and Now," Time and Space is Now Annihilated Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_First_Telegraph.jpgSaturday, April 14, 2012
  33. 33. Time and Space is Now AnnihilatedSaturday, April 14, 2012
  34. 34. “" Just imagine what could have happened if the passing success of the Lyons silk workers insurrection had been known in all corners of the nation at once!" argued a horrified member of King Louis-Philippes court.” —Johanna Neuman: "The Medias Impact on International Affairs, Then and Now," Time and Space is Now AnnihilatedSaturday, April 14, 2012
  35. 35. Global Mass Transmission “The eventual total cost of the commercial was $250,000 - an unheard of price in 1971 for an advertisement.” (approximately $2 million in today’s dollar) —http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Id_Like_to_Teach_the_World_to_Sing_(In_Perfect_Harmony)#cite_note-coke_hilltop-0Saturday, April 14, 2012
  36. 36. Global Mass Transmission “The eventual total cost of the commercial was $250,000 - an unheard of price in 1971 for an advertisement.” (approximately $2 million in today’s dollar) —http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Id_Like_to_Teach_the_World_to_Sing_(In_Perfect_Harmony)#cite_note-coke_hilltop-0Saturday, April 14, 2012
  37. 37. Emergence of the Internet “...nothing was happening until the mid ‘90s when seemingly out of nowhere, the world wide web & email exploded into view.” —Ray Kurzweil www.kurzweilai.net/articles/art0134.htmlSaturday, April 14, 2012
  38. 38. Computational Media: • Encyclopedic, • Procedural, • Interactive, • Networked, • Participatory, • Personal expression.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  39. 39. Shifting Paradigms—Participation Broadcast Media + Digital Media = Personal Media Newspapers + email = Blogs Television + digital video recording = YouTube Encyclopedias + online research = Wikipedia Music + MP3s = iTunes Radio + iPods = Podcasting Disney Land + code = Video GamesSaturday, April 14, 2012
  40. 40. Shifting Paradigms—Participation Mass Media Personal Media Main Info Source TV Web Location Living room Anywhere Main Entertainment Form Movies Electronic games Location Theater Anywhere Experience Watch, consume Participate, create Producers Few—power—$$$ Many individuals Delivery method Push PullSaturday, April 14, 2012
  41. 41. Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  42. 42. Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  43. 43. Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  44. 44. Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  45. 45. Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  46. 46. http://www.boingboing.net/ Image: http://technorati.com/weblog/blogosphere/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  47. 47. Image: http://images.businessweek.com/mz/07/24/0724_6insiid_a.gifSaturday, April 14, 2012
  48. 48. Multiple inputs require Reflection and Choice.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  49. 49. PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
  50. 50. PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
  51. 51. PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
  52. 52. PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
  53. 53. PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
  54. 54. PersonalSaturday, April 14, 2012
  55. 55. PoeticSaturday, April 14, 2012
  56. 56. PoeticSaturday, April 14, 2012
  57. 57. PoeticSaturday, April 14, 2012
  58. 58. PoeticSaturday, April 14, 2012
  59. 59. Career Oriented: Christina Rosalie http://www.mytopography.com/2012/03/28/small-rituals-holding-steady/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  60. 60. Career Oriented: Christina Rosalie http://www.mytopography.com/2012/03/28/small-rituals-holding-steady/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  61. 61. Career Oriented: Christina Rosalie http://www.mytopography.com/2012/03/28/small-rituals-holding-steady/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  62. 62. Community Outreach: Steve Keetle, Bernie SandersSaturday, April 14, 2012
  63. 63. Community Outreach: Steve Keetle, Bernie SandersSaturday, April 14, 2012
  64. 64. Activism: Arab Spring, SOPA http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/14/tunisian-president-flees-country-protests http://sopastrike.com/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  65. 65. Activism: Arab Spring, SOPA http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/14/tunisian-president-flees-country-protests http://sopastrike.com/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  66. 66. “It has shown me that it is not about how good your soccer skills are. It is about attitude, teamwork and determination. What you do when you are not on the pitch is important as well.” —Foluso, age 13, England Global Citizenship: EMC, PMC, UNFPASaturday, April 14, 2012
  67. 67. Global Citizenship: Ronny Edrie http://www.middleeastvoices.com/2012/03/israelis-iranians-on-facebook-make-peace-not-war-80285/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  68. 68. Global Citizenship: Ronny Edrie http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=mYjuUoEivbESaturday, April 14, 2012
  69. 69. Global Citizenship: Ronny Edrie http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=mYjuUoEivbESaturday, April 14, 2012
  70. 70. Global Citizenship: Piotr Czerski http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/we-the-web-kids/253382/Saturday, April 14, 2012
  71. 71. disregarding the ones which do not seem credible. We select, we filter, we remember, and we are ready to swap the learned information for a new, better one, when it comes along. To us, the Web is a sort of shared external memory. We do not have to remember unnecessary details: dates, sums, formulas, clauses, street names, detailed definitions. It is enough for us to have an abstract, the essence that is needed to process the information and relate it to others. Should we need the details, we can look them up within seconds. Similarly, we do not have to be experts in everything, because we know where to find people who specialise in what we ourselves do not know, and whom we can trust. People who will share their expertise with us not for profit, but because of our shared belief that information exists in motion, that it wants to be free, that we all benefit from the exchange of information. Every day: studying, working, solving everyday issues, pursuing interests. We know how to compete and we like to do it, but our competition, our desire to be different, is built on knowledge, on the ability to interpret and process information, and not on monopolising it. 2. Participating in cultural life is not something out of ordinary to us: global culture is the fundamental building block of our identity, more important for defining ourselves than traditions, historical narratives, social status, ancestry, or even the language that we use. From the ocean of cultural events we pick the ones that suit us the most; we interact with them, we review them, we save our reviews on websites created for that purpose, which also give us suggestions of other albums, films or games that we might like. Some films, series or videos we watch together with colleagues or with friends from around the world; our appreciation of some is only shared by a small group of people that perhaps we will never meet face to face. This is why we feel that culture is becoming simultaneously global and individual. This is why we need free access to it. This does not mean that we demand that all products of culture be available to us without charge, although when we create something, we usually just give it back for circulation. We understand that, despite the increasing accessibility of technologies which make the quality of movie or sound files so far reserved for professionals available to everyone, creativity requires effort and investment. We are prepared to pay, but the giant commission that distributors ask for seems to us to be obviously overestimated. Why should we pay for the distribution of information that can be easily and perfectly copied without any loss of the original quality? If we are only getting the information alone, we want the price to be proportional to it. We are willing to pay more, but then we expect to receive some added value: an interesting packaging, a gadget, a higher quality, the option of watching here and now, without waiting for the file to download. We are capable of showing appreciation and we do want to reward the artist (since money Global Citizenship: Piotr Czerski stopped being paper notes and became a string of numbers on the screen, paying has become a somewhat symbolic act of exchange that is supposed to benefit both parties), but the sales goals of corporations are of no interest to us whatsoever. It is not our fault that their business has ceased to make sense in its traditional form, and that instead of accepting the challenge and trying to reach us with something more than we can get for free they have decided to defend their http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/we-the-web-kids/253382/ obsolete ways.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  72. 72. disregarding the ones which do not seem credible. We select, we filter, we remember, and we are ready to swap the learned information for a new, better one, when it comes along. To us, the Web is a sort of shared external memory. We do not have to remember unnecessary details: dates, sums, formulas, clauses, street names, detailed definitions. It is enough for us to have an abstract, the essence that is needed to process the information and relate it to others. Should we need the details, we can look them up within seconds. Similarly, we do not have to be experts in everything, because we know where to find people who specialise in what we ourselves do not know, and whom we can trust. People who will share their expertise with us not for profit, but because of our shared belief that information exists in motion, that it wants to be free, that we all benefit from the exchange of information. Every day: studying, working, solving everyday issues, pursuing interests. We know how to compete and we like to do it, but our competition, our desire to be different, is built on knowledge, on the ability to interpret and process information, and not on monopolising it. 2. Participating in cultural life is not something out of ordinary to us: global culture is the fundamental building block of our identity, more important for defining ourselves than traditions, historical narratives, social status, ancestry, or even the language that we use. From the ocean of cultural events we pick the ones that suit us the most; we interact with them, we review them, we save our reviews on websites created for that purpose, which also give us suggestions of other albums, films or games that we might like. Some films, series or videos we watch together with colleagues or with friends from around the world; our appreciation of some is only shared by a small group of people that perhaps we will never meet face to face. This is why we feel that culture is becoming simultaneously global and individual. This is why we need free access to it. This does not mean that we demand that all products of culture be available to us without charge, although when we create something, we usually just give it back for circulation. We understand that, despite the increasing accessibility of technologies which make the quality of movie or sound files so far reserved for professionals available to everyone, creativity requires effort and investment. We are prepared to pay, but the giant commission that distributors ask for seems to us to be obviously overestimated. Why should we pay for the distribution of information that can be easily and perfectly copied without any loss of the original quality? If we are only getting the information alone, we want the price to be proportional to it. We are willing to pay more, but then we expect to receive some added value: an interesting packaging, a gadget, a higher quality, the option of watching here and now, without waiting for the file to download. We are capable of showing appreciation and we do want to reward the artist (since money Global Citizenship: Piotr Czerski stopped being paper notes and became a string of numbers on the screen, paying has become a somewhat symbolic act of exchange that is supposed to benefit both parties), but the sales goals of corporations are of no interest to us whatsoever. It is not our fault that their business has ceased to make sense in its traditional form, and that instead of accepting the challenge and trying to reach us with something more than we can get for free they have decided to defend their http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/we-the-web-kids/253382/ obsolete ways.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  73. 73. disregarding the ones which do not seem credible. We select, we filter, we remember, and we are ready to swap the learned information for a new, better one, when it comes along. To us, the Web is a sort of shared external memory. We do not have to remember unnecessary details: dates, sums, formulas, clauses, street names, detailed Participating in cultural life is not something out of definitions. It is enough for us to have an abstract, the essence that is needed to process the information and relate it to others. Should we need the details, we can look them up within seconds. Similarly, we do not have to be experts in ordinary to us: global culture is the fundamental building everything, because we know where to find people who specialise in what we ourselves do not know, and whom we can trust. People who will share their expertise with us not for profit, but because of our shared belief that information block of our identity, more important for defining exists in motion, that it wants to be free, that we all benefit from the exchange of information. Every day: studying, working, solving everyday issues, pursuing ourselves than traditions, historical narratives, social interests. We know how to compete and we like to do it, but our competition, our desire to be different, is built on knowledge, on the ability to interpret and process information, and not on monopolising it. status, ancestry, or even the language that we use. 2. Participating in cultural life is not something out of ordinary to us: global culture is the fundamental building block of our identity, more important for defining ourselves than traditions, historical narratives, social status, ancestry, or even the language that we use. From the ocean of cultural events we pick the ones that suit us the most; we interact with them, we review them, we save our reviews ...This is why we feel that culture is becoming on websites created for that purpose, which also give us suggestions of other albums, films or games that we might like. Some films, series or videos we watch simultaneously global and individual. This is why we need together with colleagues or with friends from around the world; our appreciation of some is only shared by a small group of people that perhaps we will never meet face to face. This is why we feel that culture is becoming simultaneously global free access to it. and individual. This is why we need free access to it. This does not mean that we demand that all products of culture be available to us without charge, although when we create something, we usually just give it back for circulation. We understand that, despite the increasing accessibility of technologies which make the quality of movie or sound files so far reserved for professionals available to everyone, creativity requires effort and investment. We are prepared to pay, but the giant commission that distributors ask for seems to us to be obviously overestimated. Why should we pay for the distribution of information that can be easily and perfectly copied without any loss of the original quality? If we are only getting the information alone, we want the price to be proportional to it. We are willing to pay more, but then we expect to receive some added value: an interesting packaging, a gadget, a higher quality, the option of watching here and now, without waiting for the file to download. We are capable of showing appreciation and we do want to reward the artist (since money Global Citizenship: Piotr Czerski stopped being paper notes and became a string of numbers on the screen, paying has become a somewhat symbolic act of exchange that is supposed to benefit both parties), but the sales goals of corporations are of no interest to us whatsoever. It is not our fault that their business has ceased to make sense in its traditional form, and that instead of accepting the challenge and trying to reach us with something more than we can get for free they have decided to defend their http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/we-the-web-kids/253382/ obsolete ways.Saturday, April 14, 2012
  74. 74. Worth Reading/Experiencing • French Ministry of Culture, “Lascaux:Visit the Grotto”, http:// www.lascaux.culture.fr/?lng=en • Elizabeth Eisenstein, “The Printing Press as an Agent of Change”, 1984 • Marshall McLuhan, “Understanding Media”, 1964 • Johanna Neuman, “Lights, Camera,War: Is Media Technology Driving International Politics?”, 1996 • Karen Armstrong, “The Case for God”, 2010 • Jared Diamond, “Guns, Germs, and Steel: the Fate of Human Societies”, 2011 • Janet Murray, “Hamlet on the Holodeck: The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace”, 1998” • Ray Kurzweil, “The Singularity is Near:When Humans Transcend Biology”, 2006 • Piotr Czerski , “We the Web Kids”, 2012 • EMC, UNFPA, PMC, “BREAKAWAY”, 2010, http://www.breakawaygame.com • Ronny Edry, “We Love You”, 2012, http://www.indiegogo.com/israeliran?c=homeSaturday, April 14, 2012
  75. 75. Time & Space Annilihated: Innovation, Communication & Society ©Ann DeMarle demarle@champlain.edu Champlain College Emergent Media Center Master of Fine Arts in Emergent MediaSaturday, April 14, 2012

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