Session 6.3 influence of extension methods and approaches in zambia
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  • 1. Influence of extension methods and approaches on adoption of agroforestry practices in Zambia Gillian Kabwe, Hugh Bigsby, Ross Cullen Presented at the World Congress of Agroforestry 10-14 February, 2014
  • 2. Outline of presentation  Background  Methods of data collection and analysis  Key findings  Conclusions
  • 3. Background  Agroforestry technologies have potential to address smallholder farmer challenges (Sanchez, 1995; Cooper et al., 1996; Kang & Akinnifesi, 2000; Franzel et al., 2001; Garrity, 2006; Race, 2009)  Low land productivity  Low crop yields  inadequate fodder for domestic animal feed  Insecure household energy  Lack of cash to meet basic needs  Trialling has been found to low; those adopting often make this part of their operation
  • 4. Trialling and adoption of agroforestry
  • 5. Study methods Multi-stage sampling for selecting farmers Purposeful  sampling of districts and agricultural camps Eight (8) agricultural camps from four (4) districts:  Chadzombe and Kumadzi (Chadiza)  Feni and Kapita (Chipata)  Chilembwe and Mwanamphangwe (Katete)  Chataika and Mondola (Petauke) Random  sampling of households 388 farm families: 57 percent male and 43 percent females
  • 6. Analysis of the data  Adoption measurement at 2 levels  Trialing  Adoption (continued use)  Statistical tools employed  Descriptive statistics  Chi-square tests of independence  Logistic regression analysis  ANOVA
  • 7. Results
  • 8. Information sources [93 percent of farmers (N = 388) were aware of agroforestry]
  • 9. Training in agroforestry
  • 10. Extension approaches (bars represents standard errors of the means according to Bonferroni test, LSD = 0.1814)
  • 11. Extension agents (bars represents standard errors of the means according to Bonferroni test, LSD = 0.1814)
  • 12. Mean score ratings of extension approaches and agents by adopters of improved fallows and biomass transfers
  • 13. To realize agroforestry benefits  More consistent extension effort  Development  Training of unified method of partners in agroforestry  Appropriate programs and policies required