360 Feedback Orientation Template

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We, at The TEAM Approach, provide this template to clients using 20/20Insight as a 360 feedback tool. It is personalized each time with screen shots showing the actual scales, etc. used in the client project.

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  • This presentation is designed to provide an overview of the 360 degree feedback process for the people who will be rating the subjects. It is a good idea to use this presentation to orient the subjects as well. Additional slides have been added at the end specifically for the subjects.
  • Suggestedl time line for classroom presentation: Introductions – 5 minutes Review process – 10 minutes Review software – 10 minutes Using the two scales – providing feedback - 20 minutes Writing effective comments – 35 minutes Results of the process – 5 minutes Q/A =5 minutes
  • Stress the connection to teamwork and interpersonal skills versus technical skills Feedback is the best method to review interpersonal skills since the perception of the recipient of your skills becomes their reality.
  • The purpose of this project is to help (fill in the target audience) develop a clear understanding of the competencies required for success as found in daily behaviors. It will give (fill in the target audience) foundational tools to build on as well as a support structure and process to use for personal development.
  • Change this slide to match the categories you have chosen for this project. Hand out a copy of the behaviors so raters can become familiar with them before the actual rating begins.
  • Good feedback helps everyone perform better. It is given in a way that enables the receiver to use it to his/her advantage and is based on observable behaviors. Ideally, we should all work in a feedback culture in which this type of communication is common place. This project can help move us in that direction by teaching and practicing good feedback skills.
  • 360 means the feedback comes from all directions as in a compass. Unlike the traditional approach of receiving feedback only from your boss at an annual review.
  • This project is designed to protect the anonymity of ratings in order to increase the objectivity of the data. The web-based software is user-friendly and speedy The Self-Development Tool Kit aids in application of the results
  • Stage 1--is the nomination of the raters. Self, immediate supervisor and direct reports are typical as a minimum; peers, work group members, and internal customers are often used Stage 2--the feedback data is gathered - using the web-based software 20/20 Insight Gold Stage 3 is when the subject receives the report. Individual coaching or a group session to learn how to use the Self-Development Tool Kit to develop an action plan is a typical approach. Ideally subjects will have a coaching session with a trained coach to help interpret the data in the reports. The fourth stage is the development and implement an action plan
  • Following slides show examples of the process If possible, connect to the internet for a live demonstration
  • All raters will receive an email message containing a hyperlink to the assessment web site.. The message will come from Rick Stamm, the administrator of the project You can forward the message to another address to complete your assessment on another computer (at home for example) Highlight the Username as First and Last Name and create your on password.
  • Your UserName will be your first and last name. You will create your own password. Remember your password
  • You may have multiple people to assess (you will be rating yourself as well) Click on the name to begin the assessment You will see approximately six screens of instructions prior to entering the assessment
  • Two scales to rate Discuss your scale. 1-6, 1-10 Comments located at bottom of screen.
  • Three part comment
  • Can leave at any time - Logoff Enter again and pick up where you left off. Can use the Review feature to go back and redo any item up until the day the assessment is taken off the web site.
  • This shows the scale you will be using to rate yourself and any others you may be asked to rate--it is the Effectiveness Scale. For each behavior/skill, you are rating your perception of the person’s behavior. For each behavior ask yourself--How well do you think the person demonstrates this skill/behavior? To what extent does this individual have a developmental need in this area? Record your rating according to the scale above. -- Or you can choose Not observed/not applicable. You can only choose one rating for each behavior you’re assessing
  • You will also be asked to rate your perception of the Importance of the behavior as it pertains to each individual you rate, including yourself. Ask yourself “How critical is this competency for this individual to be an effective leader in the organization. The competency areas are viewed to be relevant for all supervisors, however, the importance of the competency will vary for each individual depending on the individual’s specific role and level. Like the Effectiveness scale, it’s a 6 point scale, but instead of focusing on development--it focuses on importance--
  • The are a number of common assessor/rater errors. Similar to Me/Not Like Me (clone)-- This is when you use yourself as a benchmark--You tend to upgrade the people who are like you and downgrade those that differ. Solution--Evaluate yourself last Not Enough Information--- This is stressing the Not Observed Not Applicable-- This is when you’re walking the fine line between having knowledge of someone’s performance and predicting his or her performance.
  • Differences in Rater Temperament Some people are overly easy raters and other overly critical--positive or negative. Similarly, some people tend to concentrate on the middle avoiding any overly positive or negative feedback Either way --it gets in the way of effective feedback. Take a look at your ratings and see if the marks you are choosing are consistently high or low, or consistently in the middle--maybe you need to reassess. This is only for development purposes, to help with further improvement efforts. Feedback will be used to set the development plan. Where should they focus? Do your ratings reflect this?. Halo Effect-- This is when you make generalizations from one aspect of a person’s performance to all aspects of his or her performance. If an individual is good at one thing he or she must be good at everything.--The same goes for bad at everything. Solution: Stick to the behaviors. Focuses on what you are evaluating. Keep in mind that people have many different qualities--the person you’re assessing may be good at some things and not at others. No person has only strengths or only weaknesses. There is always room for improvement.
  • Another common assessor error is Short memory (Recency effect)--- This is when you place too much emphasis on recent interactions with the individual you are assessing--rather than using the whole performance period. Comments could reflect whether they have recently started a positive behavior set (Continue) or a negative behavior set (Stop). Lastly there are Leniency and Central Tendency errors: Assessors may be reluctant to give negative ratings. May be afraid of repercussions--that you’ll be found out and someone will confront you. Ratings are grouped with others--so its impossible to tell who gave what score. Central tendency Error: Avoiding extremes (both high and low) in ratings across employees (use the full scale as needed). Be honest and treat people like you want to be treated. Remember this is for development purposes. That is the mind set that you want to be in - the goal is to give them feedback which will help them identify areas to pursue which will keep them moving forward.
  • The goal in assessing someone’s performance is to give honest and helpful feedback so the individual will end up with a true picture of themselves. The key is to give a balanced assessment . Some tips so that you do provide helpful feedback are: Separate each competency. Just because someone is good in one area doesn’t mean they are good at everything. Or, just because they’re not so good at something doesn’t mean they’re the same at everything else. Use a long performance period. Don’t reflect on recent events only. Don’t assess when you’re stressed tired or angry--These moods affect your view about people and life in general. Pay attention to the whole rating scale and use it when appropriate. If you’re not sure how to rate someone on a behavior, or if you just don’t know what rating to give, then use Not observable/Not applicable.
  • After evaluating the importance of the competencies, the final area of the feedback form will give you the opportunity to provide structured comments to each individual you rate. Please take this opportunity to provide comments to those you rate. Follow these general guidelines: concentrate on specific actions. For example “This person should stop micromanaging when he delegates an assignment.” or This person should start resolving conflict within the group. Comments are taken verbatim and are randomly grouped, so that when you receive your report you will not know which comments came from your immediate supervisor or from a workgroup member.
  • Consider using the above model when providing feedback. Describe the behavior – be specific about what the person has done or not done. Focus on the behavior, not the person, avoid judging the person’s motives or intentions. Avoid vague, broad or absolute, such as “You never”, or “You always” Avoid emotional or hurtful language, such as “I will never forgive you for the time . . “ What was the outcome of the behavior? Explain the impact of the behavior on you and others -Describe the consequences of behavior on you and others. State what you would like the person to do or stop doing in the future. Describe what you would like the person to do or stop doing in the future.
  • Ask the group to evaluate what makes these comments less effective, based on the guidelines. Same type question for Effective slide.
  • Option -1 Video example.: If you have access to some video clips of a manager interacting with an employee use that as an example to practice on. Small group discussions focusing on the behaviors seen in the video Select a behavior from the skill set and evaluate the performance of that behavior by the actor in the video.. Volunteers can offer their description and then discuss as group how it could be more effective, or what’s good/could be improved. (Or however, you want to structure this activity. Option 2 - Without a video example, have them write one for either “a person they are thinking off” or themselves and again volunteers could share and then we would discuss. Option 3 - Use the next slide for some simple practice.
  • Consider using the above model when providing feedback. Describe the behavior – be specific about what the person has done or not done. Focus on the behavior, not the person, avoid judging the person’s motives or intentions. Avoid vague, broad or absolute, such as “You never”, or “You always” Avoid emotional or hurtful language, such as “I will never forgive you for the time . . “ What was the outcome of the behavior? Explain the impact of the behavior on you and others -Describe the consequences of behavior on you and others. State what you would like the person to do or stop doing in the future. Describe what you would like the person to do or stop doing in the future.
  • Consider using the above model when providing feedback. Describe the behavior – be specific about what the person has done or not done. Focus on the behavior, not the person, avoid judging the person’s motives or intentions. Avoid vague, broad or absolute, such as “You never”, or “You always” Avoid emotional or hurtful language, such as “I will never forgive you for the time . . “ What was the outcome of the behavior? Explain the impact of the behavior on you and others -Describe the consequences of behavior on you and others. State what you would like the person to do or stop doing in the future. Describe what you would like the person to do or stop doing in the future.
  • Pass around a sample report for raters to review - emphasize anonymity and confidentiality.
  • Show the two rating scales, the gap analysis and the grouping by relationship category. Stress the importance of writing comments that cannot be identified unless they want the subject to know who wrote them (in a perfect world that is what we would want). The small numbers under the scale indicates the distribution of the scores that created the average score.
  • Fill in the dates for your project
  • Some tips for getting good feedback. Since no one will see the report but you, it makes sense to select the people who are in the best position to give you accurate feedback. Important - be sure to invite people into the process. Make sure they get to see this orientation Now we’re going to look at the tool that you will be using in the process.
  • Show the subjects of the assessment this example of the email message they will receive to take them to a web site to identify their raters.
  • The subjects will login, creating their own passwords.
  • The only rater listed will be the subject for a self-rating. The additional raters need to be added. It is suggested that the subject discuss the rater selection with a supervisor before going to the web site. The supervisor may want to participate directly in this step while the subject is on the web site.
  • Example of the next screen at the web site. Point out the link to add respondents.
  • Add Last Name, then First Name, email address (please check for accuracy) and then use the drop down to select the relationship between the respondent and the subject. If a relationship is needed that is not on the list please contact the project administrator. It is best to have at least 3 raters in a relationship category with the exception of the subject’s supervisor.
  • 360 Feedback Orientation Template

    1. 1. Your Company Name Here 360 Degree Feedback Process Rater Orientation
    2. 2. <ul><li>Review 360 Degree Feedback Process </li></ul><ul><li>Explain Survey Software </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss Your Role as a Respondent </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Using the two scales </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Writing effective comments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Show the End Result </li></ul>Orientation Agenda
    3. 3. &quot;A high or low score didn't predict a scientist's ability to invent Teflon, but what the feedback did was really improve the ability of people to work in teams. Their regard for others, and behaviors that were damaging and self-centered, are what changed.&quot; William J. Miller Research Supervisor, DuPont The Goal of a Feedback Process
    4. 4. Review of the 360 Degree Feedback Process 1
    5. 5. Purpose: <ul><li>Reinforcing skills/behaviors that are key to individual success and to the organization as a whole </li></ul><ul><li>Using behavior-based competencies to provide a common language for development </li></ul>Strengthening Development by:
    6. 6. Team Leader Skill Set <ul><li>Leading by Example </li></ul><ul><li>Encouraging Innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Innovative Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making </li></ul><ul><li>Delegating </li></ul><ul><li>Observing </li></ul><ul><li>Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Teambuilding </li></ul><ul><li>Resolving Conflict </li></ul><ul><li>Performance Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Performance Management </li></ul>
    7. 7. What is Feedback? <ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>of information about behavior or performance in a way that enables receivers to use it to their advantage and benefit . </li></ul>
    8. 8. 360 Degree Feedback Supervisor Peers Direct Reports Team Members Internal/External Customers Employee “ Self”
    9. 9. 360 Degree Feedback Process <ul><li>Focuses on team leader skills </li></ul><ul><li>Maintains anonymity of ratings </li></ul><ul><li>Uses outside consultant for processing </li></ul><ul><li>Provides user-friendly tools </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a development approach </li></ul>Features
    10. 10. 360 Degree Feedback Process Feedback Cycle Identify Respondents (Nomination List) Gather Feedback Data (Feedback Survey) Receive and Interpret Feedback (Report and Coaching Session) Develop and Implement Action Plan (IDP)
    11. 11. Feedback Survey Software 20/20 Insight Web Response 2
    12. 12. 360 Degree Feedback Survey How you will assess . . . <ul><li>Go to 20/20 Insight web site with customized instructions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>user id </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>password </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This enables you to assess each person on all competencies and behaviors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Effectiveness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Importance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Data is then transmitted to The TEAM Approach for confidential processing </li></ul>
    13. 19. Using the Effectiveness Scale Minimally Effective Moderately Effective Highly Effective Not Observed/ Not Applicable <ul><li>For each behavior consider... </li></ul><ul><li>How well do you think the person demonstrates this skill/behavior? </li></ul><ul><li>To what extent do you think the person has a need to develop this behavior? </li></ul>How effective is this person in…. 1 2 3 4 5 6 N
    14. 20. Minimally Important Moderately Important Highly Important <ul><li>For each behavior consider... </li></ul><ul><li>How important is this behavior to the person’s successful performance of his/her duties? </li></ul><ul><li>How important is this behavior in creating an effective working relationship with you? </li></ul>Using the Importance Scale How important is this behavior to success? 1 2 3 4 5 6 N
    15. 21. <ul><li>1. Similar-to-Me / Not-Like-Me </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tendency to up-grade rating of people like you, and down-grade the rating of people who differ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2. Not Enough Information </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Predicting ratings when the behavior has not been observed </li></ul></ul>Common Rater Pitfalls
    16. 22. <ul><li>3. Differences in Rater Temperament </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Being overly easy or overly critical </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoiding the extremes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>4. “Halo” Effect/“Hoof and Horn” Effect </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Making generalizations from one aspect of a person’s performance to all aspects </li></ul></ul>Common Pitfalls, cont.
    17. 23. <ul><li>5. Recency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Over-emphasize recent occurrences, either favorable or unfavorable </li></ul></ul><ul><li>6. Leniency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reluctance to assign adverse ratings for fear of being confronted or “found out” </li></ul></ul>Common Pitfalls, cont.
    18. 24. Quality Feedback Tips <ul><li>Separate each behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Consider trend or pattern over several months </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t assess someone when you are tired, stressed or angry </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the entire scale when assessing </li></ul><ul><li>Use “not observed/not applicable” when appropriate </li></ul>Strive to give a balanced assessment . . .
    19. 25. Writing Effective Comments 3
    20. 26. Providing Helpful, Honest Comments <ul><li>Phrase comment so that participant will know whether to start, stop or continue </li></ul><ul><li>Recommend specific actions </li></ul><ul><li>Comments will be attached to the specific behavior and will be verbatim </li></ul>This person should start, stop or continue: “ Start . . .” “ Stop . . .” “ Continue . . .”
    21. 27. Guidelines for giving feedback <ul><li>- “When you disrupted the meeting” </li></ul><ul><li>- “people felt uncomfortable” </li></ul><ul><li>- “as a result, they stopped contributing” </li></ul><ul><li>- “Please consider the effect of your comments on others” </li></ul>B ehavior O utcome C onsequences A ctions Feedback Model
    22. 28. Inappropriate or Ineffective Comments <ul><li>“ You never think of anyone but yourself” </li></ul><ul><li>“ You’re too high-strung and negative” </li></ul><ul><li>“ You have a bad attitude” </li></ul><ul><li>“ You’ve been a big disappointment in this area” </li></ul>
    23. 29. Appropriate and Effective Comments <ul><li>Positive: “Whenever I need to discuss a key project with you, you always take time to talk with me about it. Your input makes a big difference in the quality of my work, and I hope you’ll continue to make time available for me.” </li></ul><ul><li>Constructive: “Sometimes when you’re pushed with a deadline and I enter your office, the look on your face says I’m bothering you. I tend to back off at that point. Please let me know when you don’t want to be interrupted.” </li></ul>
    24. 30. Feedback Exercise Practice Writing Effective Comments
    25. 31. Guidelines for giving feedback B ehavior O utcome C onsequences A ctions Feedback Model
    26. 32. Guidelines for giving feedback B ehavior O utcome C onsequences A ctions Feedback Model
    27. 33. Receiving the Feedback 4
    28. 34. <ul><li>Computer-generated report designed to display overall feedback data </li></ul><ul><li>Compares Importance and Effectiveness scores of each of the items </li></ul><ul><li>Provides averages on each competency for each respondent group </li></ul><ul><li>Provides written, verbatim comments from respondents </li></ul><ul><li>Provides comments from two open-ended summary questions </li></ul>Feedback Report
    29. 36. Development Planning Based on the feedback report, the subject will be able to . . . <ul><li>Identify development priorities and strengths </li></ul><ul><li>Create a development plan </li></ul><ul><li>Take action to implement development plan </li></ul><ul><li>Review progress against plan </li></ul>
    30. 37. Assessment Timeline/ Information 5
    31. 38. Project Timeline Orient Raters Complete Surveys Deadline Distribute Feedback Reports IDP Session For Subjects Nominate Feedback Providers Due: Develop Action Plan Ongoing Orient Subjects
    32. 39. Have a question, comment or concern? Call: Your Name Here Survey Team 800/864-4911
    33. 40. Subject Orientation <ul><li>Selecting raters </li></ul><ul><li>Using the web site </li></ul>
    34. 41. <ul><li>Select </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct Reports—include support staff, assistant supervisors, as appropriate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work Group Members—may not be formal direct reports </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Those who know your work best </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Individuals whose input you value </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff who have recent work exposure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoid those </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who only reflect your circle of friends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who extend more than two levels up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>With a low “familiarity weighting” </li></ul></ul>Tips for Nominating Raters
    35. 42. Email Link to Web

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