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Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012
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Gamification Workshop 27th September 2012

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  • What are you going to get out of the day? What do we want by the end?long-standing marketing techniques are now failing. They’re failing because people today are seeking more reward and more engagement from experiences than ever beforeA younger generation — the millennial generation and younger — is more technology savvy and technically game-attuned than previous generations
  • What are you going to get out of the day? What do we want by the end?long-standing marketing techniques are now failing. They’re failing because people today are seeking more reward and more engagement from experiences than ever beforeA younger generation — the millennial generation and younger — is more technology savvy and technically game-attuned than previous generations
  • SuperBetter helps you achieve your health goals — or recover from an illness or injury — by increasing your personal resilience. Resilience means staying curious, optimistic and motivated even in the face of the toughest challenges.A way to build up your core strengths — physical, mental, emotional and social
  • The family of pigs started with baby Woody for children who opened an account with a minimum of £3 and after six months, if the account contained at least £25, they received Annabel. After one year, if the account had grown to at least £50, the savers received Maxwell and at eighteen months if the account held £75 the children were rewarded with Lady Hillary. After two years, if the account had risen to at least £100, Sir Nathaniel was presented.http://www.piggybankpage.co.uk/wade_NatWest.htm
  • JP-Morgan-Palladium-Credit-Card[1]
  • The use of game mechanics to non-game applicationIt’s about gamifying the finances people should be taking care of….Similar to a shopping cart or a light switch, a great mobile design provides users with interaction cues
  • It’s not a game…There's a lot of talk of gamification in personal finance, but it shouldn't be about piling on extra layers of unwanted information. It should help us understand existing information better and understand the way our habits need to change. It should keep the user's best interest in mind. Not the marketer's.systems of badges, contests, prizes, competition, points, reward, challenges, leaderboardsReward based on SAPS _ Status, access, power, stuffGartner even posits that 50% of corporate innovation will be “gamified” by 2015.
  • What are you going to get out of the day? What do we want by the end?long-standing marketing techniques are now failing. They’re failing because people today are seeking more reward and more engagement from experiences than ever beforeA younger generation — the millennial generation and younger — is more technology savvy and technically game-attuned than previous generations
  • Personal finance needs to be simple and fun?Unburdende by excessive information Convey important information Encourage positive habitsSimpler to understand
  • http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1629214
  • The SverigesRiksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2005 - Robert J. AumannConflict and cooperation through the lens of game theoryWhy do some groups of individuals, organizations and countries succeed in promoting cooperation while others suffer from conflict? The work of Robert Aumann and Thomas Schelling has established game theory – or interactive decision theory – as the dominant approach to this age-old question.
  • John von Neumann – 1928 On the Theory of Parlor GamesVon Neumann founded the field of game theory as a mathematical discipline of minimax theorem in 1928His inspiration for game theory was poker, a game he was terribly at. What he realized was that poker was not guided by probability theory he wanted to formalize the idea of "bluffing," – Deceiving others by hiding information from them. The minimax theorem states[1]For every two-person, zero-sum game with finitely many strategies, there exists a value V and a mixed strategy for each player, such that(a) Given player 2's strategy, the best payoff possible for player 1 is V, and (b) Given player 1's strategy, the best payoff possible for player 2 is −V. Equivalently, Player 1's strategy guarantees him a payoff of V regardless of Player 2's strategy, and similarly Player 2 can guarantee himself a payoff of −V. The name minimax arises because each player minimizes the maximum payoff possible for the other—since the game is zero-sum, he also maximizes his own minimum payoff.This theorem was established by John von Neumann,[2] who is quoted as saying "As far as I can see, there could be no theory of games … without that theorem … I thought there was nothing worth publishing until the Minimax Theorem was proved".[3]See Sion'sminimax theorem and Parthasarathy's theorem for generalizations; see also example of a game without a value.He knew that game theory would prove invaluable to economists. Developed that theory with Oskar MorgensternThe lasting importance of the work on general equilibria and the methodology of fixed point theorems is underscored by the awarding of Nobel prizes in 1972 to Kenneth Arrow, in 1983 to Gérard Debreu, and in 1994 to John Nash who used fixed point theorems to establish equilibria for noncooperative games and for bargaining problems in his Ph.D thesis. Arrow and Debreu also used linear programming, as did Nobel laureates Tjalling Koopmans, Leonid Kantorovich, Wassily Leontief, Paul Samuelson, Robert Dorfman, Robert Solow, and Leonid Hurwicz.It is plausible that in 1955 the then-fifty-one-year-old Johnny's cancer sprang from his attendance at the 1946 Bikini nuclear tests.William Poundstone'sPrisoner's Dilemma,
  • http://26.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lbpg8u0P6M1qapbp3o1_500.gif
  • Jane McGonigal: Gaming can make a better world. Ted Talk.Researcher done at Carnegie Mellon University outlined that the average young person today in a country with a strong gamer culture will have spent 10,000 hours playing online games by the age of 21. In the United States 10,080 hours is the exact amount of time you will spend in school from fifth grade to high school graduation if you have perfect attendance.If you spend that amount of time on anything you will be a virtuoso – what is it that they are learning?Today the average age of players in America, the biggest market, is 37, and 42% of them are female, according to the Entertainment Software Association
  • Designedto introduce future associates to the world of hospitality.
  • http://www.selfawaregames.com/2011/11/15/the-failures-of-gamification/Autonomy = self directed (Best for engagement)Mastery = challenge and contributionPurpose = Caring (when profits lead people don’t care as much)
  • Before,darren referred to the importance of mechanics. It’s not about explicit gaming, it’s about the application (subtle or otherwise) of gaming mechanics to real world or digital experiences for a number of reasons – engage, educate and encourage being just a few of the key ones. Look at these examples, competitiveness on ebay, tripadvisor, loyalty from starbucks, status on twitter
  • How much information did linkedin take when you signed up? Even at 100% it still asks me to improve my profile
  • To run down the three key uses – encourage people to do things.
  • SalesForce | Leaderboard, Achievements, Leveling | Salesforce has taken gamification to another level with this addition to the popular CRM platform. With Engage, Salesforce users activities within the system are tied to various game mechanics and offers direct competition with other users within their organization. By incorporating this level of competitive visibility organizations can capitalize on surfacing different behaviors and hopefully drive additional engagement with their systems.Example of SalesForce's New Gamification Dashboard
  • Mint | Achievements, Progress Bar | As discussed onMashable, Mint is offering a Financial Fitness Score that is based on core game mechanics associated with task completion, progression & achievements. By taking an ordinary exercise and creating a casual gaming experience, mint is creating an opportunity to drive new user acquisition in a creative way.
  • More subtle example – Wonga have ridiculously high APR, but their site encourages fun and presents short term loans in a fairly easy to understand way. It exhibits cause and effect, and shows instant results in a more “fun” way than simply typing figures into a form
  • Solve problems with gamification. Darren mentioned the Sudan appeal and superbetter earlier, I would only add this
  • Excellent way to teach and engage, can be applied to new processes internally and externally
  • Scottish widows using game mechanics – progress, goals, comparisons and competitiveness, to educate about (and sell) pensions products.
  • And engage – communicate with audiences and engender some loyalty
  • Foursquare’srewards might seem meaningless – but think of the opportunities, like starbucks have. Free coffee for visiting many different starbucks
  • And another site rewarding engagement, klout measures social impact and influence. Now companies starting to reward activists with high klout scores as they are key influencers of opinion
  • Get people excited about a product. Works on many levels – participatory, crowdsourced, achievement, and certainly rewards – plus a gamble on the part of the product owners
  • Payoff.com will announce later today that they’ve raised $2 million in funding in a round led by Anthemis Group, Firstmark Capital, Great Oaks Venture Capital, with several unnamed “individual investors from Wall Street” participating. The startup has now raised $5.8 million in total.Here’s how Scott Saunders, CEO and founder of Payoff.com, pitches the service:“Payoff enhances people’s intrinsic motivation to achieve financial goals through rewards and by illustrating the connection between short-­‐term financial behaviors and long-­‐term goals. We want to help more people sleep better with funded savings and lighter debt loads.”Company: Payoff.comWebsite: payoff.comLaunch Date: 2009 Funding: $5.8M
  • Jane McGonigal: Gaming can make a better world. Ted Talk.Researcher done at Carnegie Mellon University outlined that the average young person today in a country with a strong gamer culture will have spent 10,000 hours playing online games by the age of 21. In the United States 10,080 hours is the exact amount of time you will spend in school from fifth grade to high school graduation if you have perfect attendance.If you spend that amount of time on anything you will be a virtuoso – what is it that they are learning?
  • Transcript

    1. Gamificationthe game’s afootGamification and financeDarren Amer, Strategy and UX ConsultantMark Russell, Strategic Consultant@precedentcomms #PrecGamification
    2. Agenda0915 Presentation1015 Making a game1040 Q&A1100 End
    3. Our objective today is tounderstand what gamification is,why you should care, howgamification is being appliedonline and…
    4. You can’t stick a badge on somethingand call it a game?
    5. The use of game mechanics to non-game application
    6. Engage - Helping people to complete tasksEducate - To solve a problemEncourage - Challenge + reward = loyalty
    7. “More than 50% of organizationswill gamify their innovationprocesses” by 2015[Gartner]
    8. 10,000 hours of gaming[Carnegie Mellon University]
    9. We connect and respondbetter to stories andchallenges. We seekautonomy, mastery andpurpose in our lives.
    10. Motivations• Acceptance • Fun• Affiliation • Loyalty• Competition • Mastery• Curiosity • Ownership• Idealism • Power• Identity • Social• Independence inclusion/contact• Instant gratification • Status• Freedom • Winning
    11. Mechanics• Achievement • Points• Appointment • Communal discovery• Avoidance • Random• Auction • Rewards• Choice • Risk• Countdown • Resource management• Difficulty • Score• Free • Time• Influence • Turns• Loss aversion • Quest• Progression
    12. EncourageHelp people to complete tasks
    13. EducateTo solve a problem
    14. EngageChallenge + reward = loyalty
    15. What makes a game?
    16. Where to start− Use a white label product (Badgeville / Bunchball)− Tie in with an existing provider (Foursquare/Klout)− Fully bespoke solution
    17. Questions for yourself – and your users− Players Who’s it for?− Motivation Loyalty, mastery, status, curiosity, fun− Mechanics Points, rewards, risk, time− How do you win?− What do you want to get out of it?

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