• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Atlantico evaluation presentation
 

Atlantico evaluation presentation

on

  • 563 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
563
Views on SlideShare
563
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
57
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Atlantico evaluation presentation Atlantico evaluation presentation Presentation Transcript

    • ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION Kate Bain English Language Fellow ktbain53@gmail.com www.elfellowkbain.wordpress.com
    • OBJECTIVE Participants will consider various aspects of assessment and evaluation and consider how to use alternative assessment to enhance instruction and learning results in their classrooms.
    • Make a list of all the different types of tests you have taken or given as a student or a teacher.
    • FROM YOUR LISTS…  Write the skill that was tested in each.  Determine whether it tested knowledge of the language or use of the language.  Which of those tests are best for…  measuring the skill tested?  achieving the purpose of testing?
    • HOW DO YOUR STUDENTS FEEL ABOUT TESTS?
    • WHAT IS A “TEST?”  Webster: “a critical examination, observation, or evaluation” http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/test  Longman: “a set of questions, exercises, or practical activities to measure someone's skill, ability, or knowledge” http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/test_1  H. Douglas Brown: “a method of measuring a person’s ability, knowledge, or performance in a given domain.” (Brown, 2004, p. 3)
    • A CLOSER LOOK “a method of measuring a person’s ability, knowledge, or performance in a given domain.” (Brown, 2004, p. 3)
    • MEASURE  In order for a test to truly be a test, it must have a measureable outcome.  The test-taker and the test-giver must know what success or failure on the test entails, and the results must be communicated. (Brown, 2004)
    • WHAT IS ASSESSMENT? Assessment is “an ongoing process that encompasses a much wider domain [than a test]. Whenever a student responds to a question, offers a comment, or tries out a new word or structure, the teacher subconsciously makes an assessment of the student’s performance.” (Brown, 2004, p. 5)
    • HOW IS “ASSESSMENT” DIFFERENT FROM “TESTING”?  Tests are a type of assessment, but they should never be the entire basis for how you determine a student’s level or progress.  Assessments are ongoing, daily, subconscious or conscious observations and records that you make about student progress. These observations should be constant and should drive what you do as a teacher. (Brown, 2004)
    • INFORMAL AND FORMAL ASSESSMENT  Unplanned observations and general feedback  Good job!  Did you say “can” or “can’t”?    Planned classroom activities in which students perform tasks but do not receive final grades on performance  Think-Pair-Share  Dialogues  Essay or Journal Writing  Note-taking  Group or Partner Work  Activities in class that you give to students for which they receive graded feedback  Tests  Rubric-Scored Assignments  Writing portfolio  Presentations  Journal Entries  Notes  Performances  Projects  Posters Informal Assessment Formal Assessment (Brown, 2004)
    • FORMATIVE AND SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT  Daily classroom assessment used to plan for, modify, and improve instruction  Feedback that helps the teacher and the student make plans to improve language competence in the future  Informal Assessment should always be formative, aimed at improving a student’s competence and performance  Measures or summarizes what a student has learned over a given period of time  Unit Tests  Midterm Exams  Final exams  Entrance Exams  Professional Language Tests Formative Assessment Summative Assessment (Brown, 2004)
    • NORM-REFERENCED AND CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS  Mean  Median  Standard Deviation  Percentile Rank  SAT/TOEFL Norm-Referenced Tests Criterion-Referenced Tests • Graded Feedback • Meeting of language or course objectives • Classroom Tests connected to a curriculum (Brown, 2004)
    • CURRENT ISSUES IN CLASSROOM TESTING: TRADITIONAL AND AUTHENTIC ASSESSMENT  One-shot, Standardized Exams  Timed, multiple-choice format  Decontextualized test items  Scores are feedback  Norm-referenced scores  One correct answer  Summative  Oriented to product  Non-interactive  Extrinsic motivation  Continuous long-term assessment  Untimed, free-response  Contextualized communicative tasks  Individualized feedback  Criterion-referenced scores  Formative  Oriented to process  Interactive performance  Intrinsic motivation Traditional Assessment Authentic Assessment (Brown, 2004, p. 13)
    • FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT
    • PEER ASSESSMENT
    • PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT
    • SELF ASSESSMENT
    • SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
    • CONFERENCES AND INTERVIEWS
    • CRITERIA/GUIDELINES
    • JOURNALS
    • LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY
    • LEARNING LOGS
    • PORTFOLIOS
    • VIDEO VIEWING
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS 1. What is the instrument students use for self-recording? What are they recording? What other things could students keep track of through self- recording?
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS What example of assignment guidelines did you see? For what kind of assignment were the criteria written? Think of a typical task in your own classroom. Try to list the criteria you might give the students to help them complete the task successfully.
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS How was the class in Video segment #2 organized? Why do you think it was organized this way? What can peers offer each other in this situation?
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS What language skill were students focusing on? What skills were they using as they worked together? Is this a form of assessment? If so, what kind of assessment was it, formative or summative?
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS What was the teacher’s job, or role, during this activity? What was the students’ responsibility?
    • SEGMENT 3: PORTFOLIOS
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS In what form are the portfolios kept and what age level uses each form? Where are they kept? Do you think students take them home? What might be some physical considerations related to using portfolios in your classroom?
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS Working in a small group, make a list of criteria or guidelines you might use for evaluating portfolios in your class.
    • SEGMENT 4: PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS List the 2 types of performance you see and the language skills that are used in each.
    • VIEWING QUESTIONS What was the purpose for each performance? Do you think the performance was well done or not?
    • WORK IN PAIRS  Decide on a type of alternative assessment that you could use in your classroom.  Give the assessment a title.  Write down the assessment …  Purpose  Instructions  Criteria (Rubric)  Share with the group!
    • THANK YOU! Katie Bain ktbain53@gmail.com www.elfellowkbain.wordpress.com www.americanenglish.state.gov
    • GROUP WORK EXERCISES! testingassessmentteaching • Do you agree with this depiction? Why or why not? • Where do these fit? • choral drill • pair pronunciation • reading aloud • singing songs • writing a description of the weekend (Brown, 2004)
    • SORT ACTIVITIES INTO A CATEGORY Formative Summative Informal Formal  placement tests  diagnostic tests  periodic achievement tests  short pop quizzes  final exams  portfolios  journals  speeches  oral presentations  impromptu student responses  student-written response  drafting and revising  final essays  whole class discussion  observing as students work in groups or pairs (Brown, 2004)
    • GARDNER’S EIGHT INTELLIGENCES  Choose one or two  Brainstorm teaching activities for each  Brainstorm assessment activities for each  Share with the group (Brown, 2004)
    • BRAINSTORM ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF EACH AND SHARE WITH THE CLASS  One-shot, Standardized Exams  Timed, multiple-choice format  decontextualized test items  Scores are feedback  Norm-referenced scores  One correct answer  Summative  Oriented to product  Non-interactive  Extrinsic motivation  Continuous long-term assessment  Untimed, free-response  Contextualized communicative tasks  Individualized feedback  Criterion-referenced scores  Formative  Oriented to process  Interactive performance  Intrinsic motivation Traditional Assessment Authentic Assessment (Brown, 2004, p. 13)
    • SOURCES  Brown, H.D. (2004). Language assessment: Principles and classroom practices. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education, Inc.  Gottleib, M. H. (2006). Assessing English Language Learners: Bridges from language proficiency to academic achievement. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.
    • THANK YOU! Katie Bain ktbain53@gmail.com www.elfellowkbain.wordpress.com www.americanenglish.state.gov