Multimedia Reporting
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Multimedia Reporting

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This lecture focuses on multimedia reporting.

This lecture focuses on multimedia reporting.

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Multimedia Reporting Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Multimedia Journalism Chapter 17 JOURN 305
  • 2. Online Journalism
    • One of the biggest growth opportunities is online journalism
    • Web Editors often make more money than their print editor counterparts
  • 3. Web Journalism
    • What works online?
      • Breaking news
      • Links to credible sources
      • Instant archives
      • Interactivity
      • Multimedia
  • 4. Differences
    • Stories may be read and/or presented in a non-linear fashion
    • Online readers may have some control of the content
    • Unlimited space to tell the story
    • Multimedia components to supplement the story text
    • Can be updated instantly with latest developing details
  • 5. Reading Habits
    • Reading online is typically 25% slower than print
    • Some “tricks” to keep a reader interested:
      • Layout with bullet points and bold subheads
      • Break longer stories into “chunks”
      • Include multimedia elements
        • Polls
        • Slideshows
        • Audio/Video
  • 6. Journalists Moving Online
    • Some established journalists are moving online to have more control over their reporting
      • Example:
        • CNN’s Daryn Kagan
        • Walter Cronkite blog
  • 7. Story Shells
    • In online reporting, you can use a story shell structure that contains all the various related elements of the reporting
      • Links to related sites/resources
      • Interactive timelines
      • Text of your reporting
      • Slideshow of images
  • 8. Example
    • “Toxic Treats” in the Orange County Register
  • 9. Example
    • “Jim West: A Spokesman-Review Investigative Report” in the Spokesman-Review
  • 10. Beat Shells
    • Many online news sites have special sections that specialize in a particular type of reporting
    • These beat shells are destination sites for updated developments on a topic
  • 11. Examples
    • Traffic section of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer
    • Iraq War coverage in the Washington Post
      • Also known as an “Issue Shell”
  • 12. Breaking News
    • Once a story is “published” online, it is not necessarily done
    • It isn’t unusual to add “updates” and information as more info comes in
      • You should disclose the change
      • Example:
        • “Story updated at 12:14 p.m. EST”
  • 13. Involving Readers
    • Include information and databases that readers can use to explore beyond your published story
    • Examples:
      • Find a local doctor
      • Compare different schools
      • Look up crime statistics
  • 14. User Comments
    • Many sites are now including opportunities for the public to comment on a story
      • These comments are often on the same page as the original story
      • Examples:
        • Wired.com
        • The Record
  • 15. Story Structure
    • Inverted Pyramid
      • Still appropriate for online hard news stories
    • Screen-size “chunks”
      • Break up a longer story into “chunk” sections so that it is easier to read
      • This can be read in a non-linear fashion
  • 16. Example of “Chunk” Storytelling
    • “Remembering Pearl Harbor” in National Geographic
  • 17. Linking
    • There are differing philosophies on whether to include links in your story
      • It helps readers navigate to more resources related to your reporting
      • It also draws people away from your site (and your ad revenue)
  • 18. Linking
    • Use only quality links
    • Don’t overdo it
    • Be aware of the integrity of the site that you are linking to
      • Does it contain spyware or NSFW content?
      • Does it contain illegal content?
  • 19. Teasing Your Story
    • Usually the front page of the site will only contain a brief “tease” to the full story
      • This “tease” is usually the first few lines or paragraph of the actual story
      • Another option is to compose a new summary of the story that is different than the lead
  • 20. Slide Shows
    • A different way to tell the story
      • Two examples from The Record
      • Johnny Cash memorial
      • Gastric bypass surgery
  • 21. Cutline Captions
    • Cutlines are the captions under a photo
    • Used to let readers know what the story is about and why the photo is significant
    • Should include:
      • Who is in the photo
      • What the people are doing
      • When, where and why the photo was taken
      • How the photo was taken (optional)
    Gene Beley, left, strides behind Johnny Cash as they cross the yard at Folsom Prison.
  • 22. Interactive Graphics
    • Many sites are using interactive graphics to tell a key part of the story
    • See several award-winning examples at the Society for News Design Web site
  • 23. Interactive Graphics
    • Text is minimal
    • Animation and graphics tell the story
      • Example: “ Hip Hop Voices” in the Sun-Sentinel
    • Be careful in how you integrate navigation instructions
      • Example: “Remembering D-Day” in the Sun-Sentinel
  • 24. Storytelling on the Web
    • Find a fresh idea
    • Focus your topic
    • Plan and research
    • Sketch a storyboard
    • Report, edit and revise
    • Test and troubleshoot
  • 25. Examples
    • “Touching Hearts” in the Herald Sun
    • Interactivenarratives.org
  • 26. Backpack Journalism
    • Online journalists need to know how to write, shoot and record
      • They also have technology skills for posting/uploading stories online
    • “Backpack Journalism” = All the tools for reporting fit in your backpack
      • Self-contained reporter from story creation to distribution