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Some Impressionistic takes from the book
      Jim Loehr & Tony Schwarrtz
   “The Power of Full Engagement”
      by R. Ramakrishnan (Ramki)
             ramaddster@gmail.com
About the Author
Jim Loehr is Chairman , CEO and co-founder of LGE
performance systems and is recognized globally for his
contribution to the field of performance psychology. He has
worked with hundreds of world-class athletes, as well as police
departments, emergency service workers. He co-founded LGE
in 1993 to begin applying principles developed during his work
with athletes to corporate executives. He has authored 12
books including the best selling “ Stress for success &
Toughness Training for sports”
Tony Schwartz is President and founder of the Energy project
whose mission is to ignite a fire in the hearts of the
organizations & their leaders. He is the author of 3 other books
including the No.1 best-selling “ Art of the deal with Donald
Trump, What really matters , Searching for wisdom in America
and Work in progress. He has been a reporter for The New
York times , an associated editor of Newsweek.
Prelude
Energy, not time, is our most precious resource. Energy is the fundamental currency
of high performance. Performance, health and happiness are grounded in the skilful
management of energy.

Leaders are the stewards of organizational energy—in companies, organizations, and
even in families. They inspire or demoralize others first by how effectively they
manage their own energy and next by how well they mobilize, focus, invest and
renew the collective energy of those they lead. The skilful management of energy,
individually and organizationally, makes possible something that we call full
engagement. Full engagement is the energy state that best serves performance.

The pace of change in the world has finally outstripped our abilities as humans to
keep up. The worst part is we feel powerless to do anything about it, that we have
just do the best we can, get through the day & deal with the rest of it tomorrow.

The power of full engagement : Managing Energy , Not time is the key to high
performance and personal renewal
Objective – Perform in the Storm




  Build the necessary capacity to sustain
high performance in the face of increasing
                 demand
1
Human Energy Vs. Engagement
Energy
Energy is fundamental currency of high
performance
 Capacity is a function of one’s ability to
  expend & recover energy
 Every thought, feeling and action has a energy
  consequence.

 Energy is the most important resource to
  individual and organization
   Our most critical resource is our energy ,Most fail to manage it effectively
Sources of Human Energy
 Physical
   Fundamental source of fuel
   Affects alertness, emotional management ,
    concentration, creativity & commitment
 The size of energy reservoir depends on
      Patterns of breathing
      Food we eat and when we eat it
      The quality & quantity of sleep
      Intermittent recovery opportunities during day
      Level of our fitness
      Physical capacity is reflected in one’s ability to expend and recover
          energy at the physical level- defined by Quantity of energy
Sources of Human Energy
 Emotional
   Defines the quality of energy given
   Emotions such as fear, anxiety, anger, sadness are
   associated with release of specific stress hormones
 The size of energy reservoir depends on
     Our self confidence
     Our ability to self-regulate
     Our interpersonal effectiveness
     Our ability to empathize


   Emotional capacity is reflected in one’s ability to expend and recover
     energy at the emotional level- defined by quality of the energy
Sources of Human Energy
 Mental
    Defines the ability to focus our energy
    Allows us to concentrate (sustain focus), move fluidly
     between broad/narrow and internal/external focus and be
     creative
    Permits us to have realistic optimism (i.e., seeing the world
     as it is but moving positively toward a desired outcome or
     solution)
 The size of energy reservoir depends on
    Our mental preparation & Our visualization
    Our positive self-talk &
    Our ability to manage our time effectively
Mental capacity is reflected in one’s ability to expend and recover energy at the
               Mental level- defined by the focus of the energy
Sources of Human Energy
 Spiritual
    Energy derived from out connection to our deeply held
     set of values and to a purpose beyond our self-interest
    Defines the motivation and perseverance to spend our
     energy
    Sustained by balancing commitment to others with
     personal self-care
 The size of our energy reservoir depends on:
    Our courage & conviction to live by our values
    Our passion & Our commitment
    Our integrity and honesty
 Spiritual capacity is reflected in one’s ability to expend and recover energy at
               the Spiritual level- defined by force of the energy
2
   Dynamics of Full Engagement
The acquired ability to intentionally invest your
  full and best energy, right here, right now.
The Power of Full Engagement
            Old Paradigm                        New Paradigm
   Manage time                         Manage energy
   Avoid stress                        Seek stress
   Life is a marathon                  Life is a series of sprints
   Downtime is wasted time             Downtime is productive time
   Rewards fuel performance            Purpose fuels performance
   Self-disciple rules                 Rituals rule
   The power of positive thinking      The power of full engagement
Full Engagement Requires you to be


                      Spiritually
                                    Aligned
                      Mentally
                                        Focused

                    Emotionally               Connected

                     Physically                   Energized



       Optimal energy in the context of high performance
    Physical Energy is the foundation for the full engagement
Barriers to Full Engagement
Barriers to full engagement


 Negative habits that block,
  distort, waste, diminish, deplete
  and contaminate stored energy
 Not knowing
 Not tracking / not focusing on
  the goals
Strategic Recovery ( in all dimensions)




  Energy expenditure must be balanced with energy recovery.
Measuring Energy
 The quantity of available energy (physical) is
  measured in terms of volume (low and high).
 The quality of available energy (emotional) is
  measured in terms of unpleasant (negative) to
  pleasant (positive).
 The focus of available energy (mental) is
  measured in terms of broad to narrow and external
  to internal.
 The force of available energy (spiritual) is
  measured in terms of self to others, external to
  internal and negative to positive.
Optimal Performance requires
 Greatest quantity of energy- Physical

 Highest quality of energy-Emotional

 Clearest focus of energy- Mental

 Maximum force of energy- Spiritual
Full Engagement Principles
Managing Energy , not time is key to high performance

Four Principles:
 Principle 1 : Full engagement requires drawing on
  four separate but related sources of energy:
  physical, emotional, mental and spiritual

 Principle 2: Because energy capacity diminishes
  both with overuse and with underuse, we must
  balance energy expenditure with intermittent energy
  renewal.
Full Engagement Principles

Four Principles:
 Principle 3 : To build capacity, we must push
  beyond our normal limits, training in the same
  systematic way that elite athletes do.

 Principle 4 :Positive energy rituals—highly
  specific routines for managing energy—are the
  key to full engagement and sustained high
  performance.
Principle 1
 Full engagement requires drawing         on   four
  separate but related sources of energy
      Physical
      Emotional
      Mental
      Spiritual
The Dynamics of Energy- 4 Quadrants
                              Full    Engagement     Is
                              possible only when our
                              energy is present in the
                              high positive quadrant



                              Physical Energy –capacity
                              is measured in terms of
                              quantity – Low to High



                              Emotional          Energy-
                              Capacity in quality –
                              Negative to Positive
Principle 1- contd..
 Four sources of energy are
  interconnected in much the
  same way as the cylinders
  of a car engine.
 If cylinder misfires, the
  entire engine sputters.

 Physical & emotional energies are our most
  fundamental energies.
 Together they describe our affect- how we present
  ourselves to the external world .
Principle 1- contd..

 As important as the high
  positive energies are to full
  engagement , the energies
  of low positive quadrant
  also deserve comment.
 They are the energies of
  the      “      Strategically
  disengaged” the energies of
  renewal.
 This leads to Principle 2 …..
Principle 2
Because energy capacity diminishes both with
overuse & with underuse. We must balance energy
expenditure with intermittent energy renewal
 In order to be fully engaged we must
  periodically disengage & renew
  ourselves
 We can’t expect to be fully engaged
  100% all the time. We need to
  recover & replenish our energies
 Recovery is not only important, it’s
  actually necessary for optimal
  performance.
Principle 3
To build capacity, we must push beyond our normal
limits, training in the same systematic way that elite
athletes do.
 Stress is not the enemy in our lives, it is
  the key to growth.
 To build strength in our muscle we must
  systematically stress it, expending
  energy beyond normal levels.
 This causes microscopic tears in the
  muscle fibers resulting in diminished
  functional capacity.
 Give the muscle 24 to 48 hours to
  recover & it grows stronger & better
Principle 3

 Like we build physical strength for our
  muscles, we need to build muscles in
  every dimension of our lives
   From Empathy & patience to focus &
     creativity to integrity & commitment.
   What applies to the body applies
     equally to the other dimensions of life.
   This insight both simplifies &
     revolutionizes the way we approach
     the barriers that stand in our way.
Principle 4
Positive Energy Rituals-highly specific routines for
managing energy – are the key to full engagement &
sustained high performance
 Human beings are creatures of habit.
 Change is difficult – what we do is
  automatic & unconscious.
 It is difficult to sustain the effort over
  long haul.
 Will & discipline are far more limited
  resources than most of us realize.
 The status quo has a magnetic pull
  on us
Making Change- 3 Step Process (1/2 )
 Define Purpose -surface and articulate the
  most important values to define a vision both
  personally & professionally.
 Connecting to a deep set of values & creating a
  compelling vision fuels a uniquely high- octane
  source of energy for change, it also serves as a
  compass for navigating the storms that
  inevitable arise in our lives.
 Face the Truth - it is impossible to chart a
  course for change until you are able to look
  honestly at who you are today.
 The first question to ask is :
   How are you spending your energy today?
 Facing the truth begins with gathering credible
  data.
Making Change- 3 Step Process (2/2 )
 Take Action- to close the gap
  between who you are and who
  you want to be . between how
  you manage your energy now
  and how you want to manage
  your energy to achieve whatever
  mission you are on.
 This step involves building a personal development plan
  grounded in positive energy rituals.
 Building rituals requires defining very precise behaviours and
  performing them at very specific times . motivated by deeply
  held values.
3
The Pulse of High Performance
(Balancing Stress & Recovery)
Balancing Stress & Energy
 Energy is simply the capacity to do work. Our most
  fundamental need as human beings is to spend &
  recover energy. The authors call this oscillation.
 The opposite of oscillation is linearity: too much
  energy expenditure without recovery or too much
  recovery without sufficient energy expenditure.
 Balancing stress and recovery is critical to high
  performance both individually and organizationally.
Balancing Stress & Energy
 We must sustain health oscillatory rhythms at four
  levels of what they term the performance pyramid.:
  physical, emotional, mental & spiritual.
 We build emotional, mental & spiritual capacity in
  precisely the same way we build physical capacity.
  We must systematically expose ourselves to stress
  beyond our normal limits, followed by adequate
  recovery.
 Emotional depth & resilience depend on active
  engagement with others & with our own feelings.
  Mental acuity diminishes in the absence of on-going
  intellectual challenge.
Balancing Stress & Energy
 Spiritual energy capacity depends on regularly revisiting
  our deepest values & holding ourselves accountable in our
  behaviour.
 Full engagement requires cultivating a dynamic balance
  between the expenditure of energy (stress) & the renewal
  of energy (recovery) in all dimensions. The authors call
  this rhythmic wave oscillation, and it represents the
  fundamental pulse of life.
 Expanding capacity requires a willingness to endure short-
  term discomfort in the service of long-term reward. The
  key to expanding capacity is both to push beyond one's
  ordinary limits and to regularly seek recovery, which is
  when growth actually occurs.
4
Physical Energy -Fueling the Fire
Physical Energy- 1/4
 Physical energy is the fundamental source of fuel in life,
  even if our work is almost completely sedentary. It not only
  lies at the heart of alertness & vitality but also affects our
  ability to manage our Emotions, Sustain concentration, Think
  creatively, and even maintain our commitment to whatever
  mission we are on.
 Physical energy is derived from the interaction between
  oxygen & glucose.
 The two most important regulators of physical energy are
  breathing & eating. The size of our energy reservoir depends
  on the patterns of our breathing, the foods that we eat &
  when we eat them, the quantity and quality of our sleep, the
  degree to which we get intermittent recovery during the day
  & the level of our fitness.
Physical Energy -2/4
 The breath is a powerful tool for self regulation- a means to
  summon energy & to relax deeply.
 Extending the exhalation prompts a powerful wave of recovery.
  Breathing in to a count of three & out to a count of six, lowers
  arousal & quiets not just the body but also the mind and the
  emotions.
 Eating 5 to 6 low-calorie, highly nutritious meals a day ensures
  a steady resupply of glucose & essential nutrients. Sustained
  performance depends not just on eating at regular intervals but
  also eating only as much as you need to drive your energy for
  the next 2 to 3 hours. Snacks between meals should typically
  be between 100 & 150 calories & should focus on low-glycemic
  foods such as nuts & sunflower seeds, fruits, or half of a typical-
  size 200 calorie energy bar
Examples – Eating-When & how
             Example 1:
  Only eating 2 large meals per day




  Eat every 3 hours +/- 1 hour
  Never go more than 4 hours
        without eating!


                                      Example 2: Only 3 small
                                      meals & 3 small snacks
What to Eat




   Sustainable energy:
        low glycemic

   Balance of nutrients:
        physiological needs
Physical Energy- 3/4
 Drinking 64 ounces of water daily is a key
  factor in the effective management of
  physical energy. Inadequate hydration
  compromises          concentration       and
  coordination.
 Most human beings require 7 to 8 hours of
  sleep per night to function optimally. In
  addition to its energy renewing function,
  sleep is also a period during which
  substantial growth & repair occur – most of
  it at the deepest level of sleep, when slow-
  wave delta brainwaves are dominant.
 Going to bed early and waking up early
  help to optimize performance.
Physical Energy- 4/4
 Interval training is more effective than steady-state exercise
  in building physical capacity & in teaching people how to
  recover more efficiently.
 To sustain full engagement, we must take a recovery break
  every 90 to 120 minutes. Just as we cycle through levels of
  sleep at night, so our potential for engagement varies during
  our waking hours.
 Brief periods of rest are crucial to sustaining energy over
  long hours.
5
        Emotional Energy
Transforming threat into challenge
Emotional Energy- 1/3
 Emotional intelligence, from the authors perspective, is
  simply the capacity to manage emotions skilfully in the
  service of high positive energy & full engagement.
 In order to perform at our best, we must access pleasant &
  positive emotions; the experience of enjoyment, challenge,
  adventure and opportunity.
 The key muscles fuelling positive energy are self-confidence,
  self-control, interpersonal effectiveness and empathy.
 Access to the emotional muscles that best serve
  performance depends on creating a balance between
  exercising them regularly and intermittently seeking
  recovery. Physical and emotional energy are inextricably
  connected.
Emotional Energy- 2/3
 Negative emotions serve survival but they
  are very costly & energy inefficient in the
  context of performance. For leaders and
  managers, negative emotions are doubly
  insidious, because they are also infectious.
 The ability to summon positive emotions
  during periods of intense stress & to
  communicate consistently positive energy
  lies at the heart of effective leadership.
 Access to the emotional muscles that serve
  performance depends on creating a balance
  between exercising them regularly &
  intermittently seeking recovery.
Emotional Energy- 3/3
 The delicate dance of a healthy friendship can
  be a powerful source both of positive energy &
  of renewal. The pulse of a strong relationship
  involves a rhythmic movement between giving
  & taking, talking and listening, valuing the other
  person and feeling commensurately valued in
  return.
 Any activity that is enjoyable, fulfilling and
  affirming serves as a source of emotional
  renewal and recovery.
 Emotional muscles such as patience, empathy
  & confidence can be strengthened in the same
  way that we strengthen a bicep or a triceps:
  pushing past our current limits followed by
  recovery
6
            Mental Energy
Appropriate Focus & Realistic Optimism
Mental Energy- 1/3
 Just as physical energy is the fundamental
  fuel for emotional competencies, so it is
  the fuel for mental skills. Mental capacity is
  what we use to organize our lives and
  focus our attention. Nothing so interferes
  with performance and engagement as the
  inability to concentrate on the task at
  hand. To perform at our best we must be
  able to sustain concentration, and to move
  flexibly between broad & narrow, as well
  as internal and external focus.
 The mental energy that best serves full
  engagement is realistic optimism . seeing
  the world as it is, but always working
  positively towards a desired outcome or
  solution.
Mental Energy- 2/3
 The key supportive mental muscles include mental
  preparation, visualization, positive self-talk, effective time
  management & creativity.
 Changing channels mentally permits different parts of the
  brain to be activated & facilitates creativity.
 Physical exercise stimulates cognitive capacity. It does so by
  driving more blood and oxygen to the brain
 Thinking uses up a lot of energy. The consequences of
  insufficient mental recovery range from increased mistakes
  of judgment & execution to lower creativity and a failure to
  take reasonable account of risks. The key to mental recovery
  is to give the conscious, thinking mind intermittent rest.
Mental Energy- 3/3
 Maximum mental capacity is derived from a balance between
  expending and recovering mental energy.
 The highest form of creativity depends on a rhythmic
  movement between engagement and disengagement,
  thinking & letting go, activity and rest.
 When we lack the mental muscles we need to perform at our
  best, we must systematically build capacity by pushing past
  our comfort zone & then recovering.
 Continuing to challenge the brain serves as a protection
  against age-related mental decline
7
    Spiritual Energy
He who has a why to live
Spiritual Energy

 Spiritual energy provides the force for action in all
  dimensions of our lives. It fuels passion,
  perseverance and commitment.
 Spiritual energy is derived from a connection to
  deeply held values & a purpose beyond our self-
  interest.
 At the practical level, anything that ignites the
  human spirit serves to drive full engagement & to
  maximize performance in whatever mission we are
  on.
Spiritual Energy
 Character - the courage & conviction to live by our
  deepest values is the key muscle that serves spiritual
  energy.
 The key supportive spiritual muscles are passion,
  commitment, integrity and honesty.
 Spiritual energy expenditure & energy renewal are deeply
  interconnected.
 Spiritual energy is sustained by balancing a commitment
  to a purpose beyond ourselves with adequate self-care.
 The capacity to live by our deepest values depends on
  regularly renewing our spirit - seeking ways to rest &
  rejuvenate & to reconnect with the values that we find
  most inspiring & meaningful.
8
The Training System
Defining Purpose- Rules of Engagement
 The most compelling source of purpose is spiritual, the
  energy derived from connecting to deeply held values
  and a purpose beyond one’s self-interest.
 Purpose creates a destination. We become fully
  engaged only when we care deeply, when we feel that
  what we are doing really matters. The search for
  meaning is among the most powerful & enduring
  themes in every culture since the origin of recorded
  history.
 The “Hero’s journey” is grounded in mobilizing,
  nurturing & regularly renewing our most precious
  resource, energy, in the service of what matter most.
Defining Purpose- Rules of Engagement
 Purpose fuels focus, direction, passion & perseverance.
 When we lack a strong purpose we are easily buffeted
  by life’s inevitable storms.
 Purpose becomes a more powerful & enduring source of
  energy when its source moves from negative to positive,
  external to internal & self to others.
 A negative source of purpose is defensive & deficit-
  based. Purpose fuelled by the feeling of deficit also
  narrows our attention & limits our possibilities.
 Intrinsic motivation grows out of the desire to engage in
  an activity because we value it for the inherent
  satisfaction it provides.
Defining Purpose- Rules of Engagement
 Values fuel the energy on which purpose is built. They
  hold us to a different standard for managing our
  energy. A value is ultimately just a roadmap for action.
 Values we fail to reflect in our behaviour are ultimately
  empty.
 A value in action is a virtue. Alignment occurs when
  we transform our values into virtues. Simply
  identifying our primary values is not sufficient. The
  next step is to define more precisely how we intend to
  embody the values in our daily lives, regardless of
  external pressures
Face the Truth- How are you managing your energy now ?
 Facing the truth about the gap between who we want to
  be & who we really are is never easy. Each of us has an
  infinite capacity for self-deception.
 Facing the truth frees up energy & is the second stage,
  after defining purpose, in becoming fully engaged.
 Avoiding the truth consumes great effort and energy.
 At the most basic level, we deceive ourselves in order to
  protect our self-esteem. We each have our own well-
  funded defence department.
 We do things like numb out, rationalize against the truth
  & intellectualize as a means of acknowledging the truth
  cognitively without experiencing its impact emotionally
Face the Truth- How are you managing your energy now ?

 Some truths are too unbearable to be absorbed all at once.
  Emotions such as grief are best metabolized in waves.
 Truth without compassion is cruelty, to others & to ourselves.
 What we fail to acknowledge about ourselves we often
  continue to act out unconsciously.
 A common form of self-deception is assuming that our view
  represents the truth, when it is really just a lens through
  which we choose to view the world. It is really just an
  interpretation.
 Facing the truth requires that we retain an on-going
  openness to the possibility that we may not be seeing
  ourselves, or others, accurately
Face the Truth- How are you managing your energy now ?
 Facing the truth requires making yourself the object of inquiry -
  conducting an audit of your life & holding yourself accountable
  for the energy consequences of your behaviours.
 It is both a danger & a delusion when we become too identified
  with a singular view of ourselves. We are all a blend of light and
  shadow, virtues and vices.
 Accepting our limitations reduces our defensiveness & increases
  the amount of positive energy available to us.
 The Serenity Prayer is a perfect primer on ideal energy
  management: God grant me the serenity to accept the things I
  cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; & the
  wisdom to know the difference. We spend vast amounts of
  energy worrying about people & situations over which we have
  no control. Far better to concentrate our energy on that which we
  can influence.
Taking action- The Power of Positive Rituals
 Rituals serve as tools through which we effectively manage energy
  in the service of whatever mission we are on.
 Rituals create a means by which we translate our values & priorities
  into action in all dimensions of our life.
 All great performers rely on positive rituals to manage their energy
  & regulate their behavior
 The limitations of conscious will & discipline are rooted in the fact
  that every demand on our self control draws on the same limited
  resources
 We can off-set our limited will & discipline by building rituals that
  become as automatic as quickly as possible , fueled by our deepest
  values.
 The most important role of rituals is to insure effective balance
  between energy expenditure & energy renewal in the service of full
  engagement.
Taking action- The Power of Positive Rituals
 The most exacting challenge and the greater the pressure, the
  more rigorous our rituals need to be. The bigger the storm, the
  more inclined we are to revert to our survival habits, & the more
  important positive rituals become.
 Precision & specificity are critical dimensions of building rituals
  during the thirty-to sixty-day acquisition period. The specificity &
  precision of rituals also makes it more likely that we will be able to
  produce them under pressure.
 It also helps to assure that our rituals themselves remain fuelled by
  our deepest values.
 By building a ritual to regularly revisit our vision we can insure a
  strong, continuing connection to the source of energy such a
  statement provides.
 Far from precluding spontaneity, rituals provide a level of comfort,
  continuity and security that frees us to improvise and to take risks
Key take away/ Bear in mind
 Managing energy, not time, is the fundamental
  currency of high performance.       Performance is
  grounded in the skillful management of energy.
 Great leaders are stewards of organizational energy.
  They begin by effectively managing their own
  energy. As leaders, they must mobilize, focus,
  invest, channel, renew, and expand the energy of
  others.
 Full engagement is the energy state that best serves
  performance.
 Review the Four Principles.
 Making change – 3 steps process
Decide where you want to be
Happy Reading, Learning & Application
       Mail your comments to
      ramaddster@gmail.com

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The Power Of Full Engagement

  • 1. Some Impressionistic takes from the book Jim Loehr & Tony Schwarrtz “The Power of Full Engagement” by R. Ramakrishnan (Ramki) ramaddster@gmail.com
  • 2. About the Author Jim Loehr is Chairman , CEO and co-founder of LGE performance systems and is recognized globally for his contribution to the field of performance psychology. He has worked with hundreds of world-class athletes, as well as police departments, emergency service workers. He co-founded LGE in 1993 to begin applying principles developed during his work with athletes to corporate executives. He has authored 12 books including the best selling “ Stress for success & Toughness Training for sports” Tony Schwartz is President and founder of the Energy project whose mission is to ignite a fire in the hearts of the organizations & their leaders. He is the author of 3 other books including the No.1 best-selling “ Art of the deal with Donald Trump, What really matters , Searching for wisdom in America and Work in progress. He has been a reporter for The New York times , an associated editor of Newsweek.
  • 3. Prelude Energy, not time, is our most precious resource. Energy is the fundamental currency of high performance. Performance, health and happiness are grounded in the skilful management of energy. Leaders are the stewards of organizational energy—in companies, organizations, and even in families. They inspire or demoralize others first by how effectively they manage their own energy and next by how well they mobilize, focus, invest and renew the collective energy of those they lead. The skilful management of energy, individually and organizationally, makes possible something that we call full engagement. Full engagement is the energy state that best serves performance. The pace of change in the world has finally outstripped our abilities as humans to keep up. The worst part is we feel powerless to do anything about it, that we have just do the best we can, get through the day & deal with the rest of it tomorrow. The power of full engagement : Managing Energy , Not time is the key to high performance and personal renewal
  • 4. Objective – Perform in the Storm Build the necessary capacity to sustain high performance in the face of increasing demand
  • 5. 1 Human Energy Vs. Engagement
  • 6. Energy Energy is fundamental currency of high performance  Capacity is a function of one’s ability to expend & recover energy  Every thought, feeling and action has a energy consequence.  Energy is the most important resource to individual and organization Our most critical resource is our energy ,Most fail to manage it effectively
  • 7.
  • 8. Sources of Human Energy  Physical  Fundamental source of fuel  Affects alertness, emotional management , concentration, creativity & commitment  The size of energy reservoir depends on  Patterns of breathing  Food we eat and when we eat it  The quality & quantity of sleep  Intermittent recovery opportunities during day  Level of our fitness Physical capacity is reflected in one’s ability to expend and recover energy at the physical level- defined by Quantity of energy
  • 9. Sources of Human Energy  Emotional  Defines the quality of energy given  Emotions such as fear, anxiety, anger, sadness are  associated with release of specific stress hormones  The size of energy reservoir depends on  Our self confidence  Our ability to self-regulate  Our interpersonal effectiveness  Our ability to empathize Emotional capacity is reflected in one’s ability to expend and recover energy at the emotional level- defined by quality of the energy
  • 10. Sources of Human Energy  Mental  Defines the ability to focus our energy  Allows us to concentrate (sustain focus), move fluidly between broad/narrow and internal/external focus and be creative  Permits us to have realistic optimism (i.e., seeing the world as it is but moving positively toward a desired outcome or solution)  The size of energy reservoir depends on  Our mental preparation & Our visualization  Our positive self-talk &  Our ability to manage our time effectively Mental capacity is reflected in one’s ability to expend and recover energy at the Mental level- defined by the focus of the energy
  • 11. Sources of Human Energy  Spiritual  Energy derived from out connection to our deeply held set of values and to a purpose beyond our self-interest  Defines the motivation and perseverance to spend our energy  Sustained by balancing commitment to others with personal self-care  The size of our energy reservoir depends on:  Our courage & conviction to live by our values  Our passion & Our commitment  Our integrity and honesty Spiritual capacity is reflected in one’s ability to expend and recover energy at the Spiritual level- defined by force of the energy
  • 12. 2 Dynamics of Full Engagement The acquired ability to intentionally invest your full and best energy, right here, right now.
  • 13. The Power of Full Engagement Old Paradigm New Paradigm  Manage time  Manage energy  Avoid stress  Seek stress  Life is a marathon  Life is a series of sprints  Downtime is wasted time  Downtime is productive time  Rewards fuel performance  Purpose fuels performance  Self-disciple rules  Rituals rule  The power of positive thinking  The power of full engagement
  • 14. Full Engagement Requires you to be Spiritually Aligned Mentally Focused Emotionally Connected Physically Energized Optimal energy in the context of high performance Physical Energy is the foundation for the full engagement
  • 15. Barriers to Full Engagement
  • 16. Barriers to full engagement  Negative habits that block, distort, waste, diminish, deplete and contaminate stored energy  Not knowing  Not tracking / not focusing on the goals
  • 17. Strategic Recovery ( in all dimensions) Energy expenditure must be balanced with energy recovery.
  • 18. Measuring Energy  The quantity of available energy (physical) is measured in terms of volume (low and high).  The quality of available energy (emotional) is measured in terms of unpleasant (negative) to pleasant (positive).  The focus of available energy (mental) is measured in terms of broad to narrow and external to internal.  The force of available energy (spiritual) is measured in terms of self to others, external to internal and negative to positive.
  • 19. Optimal Performance requires  Greatest quantity of energy- Physical  Highest quality of energy-Emotional  Clearest focus of energy- Mental  Maximum force of energy- Spiritual
  • 20. Full Engagement Principles Managing Energy , not time is key to high performance Four Principles:  Principle 1 : Full engagement requires drawing on four separate but related sources of energy: physical, emotional, mental and spiritual  Principle 2: Because energy capacity diminishes both with overuse and with underuse, we must balance energy expenditure with intermittent energy renewal.
  • 21. Full Engagement Principles Four Principles:  Principle 3 : To build capacity, we must push beyond our normal limits, training in the same systematic way that elite athletes do.  Principle 4 :Positive energy rituals—highly specific routines for managing energy—are the key to full engagement and sustained high performance.
  • 22. Principle 1  Full engagement requires drawing on four separate but related sources of energy  Physical  Emotional  Mental  Spiritual
  • 23. The Dynamics of Energy- 4 Quadrants Full Engagement Is possible only when our energy is present in the high positive quadrant Physical Energy –capacity is measured in terms of quantity – Low to High Emotional Energy- Capacity in quality – Negative to Positive
  • 24. Principle 1- contd..  Four sources of energy are interconnected in much the same way as the cylinders of a car engine.  If cylinder misfires, the entire engine sputters.  Physical & emotional energies are our most fundamental energies.  Together they describe our affect- how we present ourselves to the external world .
  • 25. Principle 1- contd..  As important as the high positive energies are to full engagement , the energies of low positive quadrant also deserve comment.  They are the energies of the “ Strategically disengaged” the energies of renewal.  This leads to Principle 2 …..
  • 26. Principle 2 Because energy capacity diminishes both with overuse & with underuse. We must balance energy expenditure with intermittent energy renewal  In order to be fully engaged we must periodically disengage & renew ourselves  We can’t expect to be fully engaged 100% all the time. We need to recover & replenish our energies  Recovery is not only important, it’s actually necessary for optimal performance.
  • 27. Principle 3 To build capacity, we must push beyond our normal limits, training in the same systematic way that elite athletes do.  Stress is not the enemy in our lives, it is the key to growth.  To build strength in our muscle we must systematically stress it, expending energy beyond normal levels.  This causes microscopic tears in the muscle fibers resulting in diminished functional capacity.  Give the muscle 24 to 48 hours to recover & it grows stronger & better
  • 28. Principle 3  Like we build physical strength for our muscles, we need to build muscles in every dimension of our lives  From Empathy & patience to focus & creativity to integrity & commitment.  What applies to the body applies equally to the other dimensions of life.  This insight both simplifies & revolutionizes the way we approach the barriers that stand in our way.
  • 29. Principle 4 Positive Energy Rituals-highly specific routines for managing energy – are the key to full engagement & sustained high performance  Human beings are creatures of habit.  Change is difficult – what we do is automatic & unconscious.  It is difficult to sustain the effort over long haul.  Will & discipline are far more limited resources than most of us realize.  The status quo has a magnetic pull on us
  • 30. Making Change- 3 Step Process (1/2 )  Define Purpose -surface and articulate the most important values to define a vision both personally & professionally.  Connecting to a deep set of values & creating a compelling vision fuels a uniquely high- octane source of energy for change, it also serves as a compass for navigating the storms that inevitable arise in our lives.  Face the Truth - it is impossible to chart a course for change until you are able to look honestly at who you are today.  The first question to ask is :  How are you spending your energy today?  Facing the truth begins with gathering credible data.
  • 31. Making Change- 3 Step Process (2/2 )  Take Action- to close the gap between who you are and who you want to be . between how you manage your energy now and how you want to manage your energy to achieve whatever mission you are on.  This step involves building a personal development plan grounded in positive energy rituals.  Building rituals requires defining very precise behaviours and performing them at very specific times . motivated by deeply held values.
  • 32. 3 The Pulse of High Performance (Balancing Stress & Recovery)
  • 33. Balancing Stress & Energy  Energy is simply the capacity to do work. Our most fundamental need as human beings is to spend & recover energy. The authors call this oscillation.  The opposite of oscillation is linearity: too much energy expenditure without recovery or too much recovery without sufficient energy expenditure.  Balancing stress and recovery is critical to high performance both individually and organizationally.
  • 34. Balancing Stress & Energy  We must sustain health oscillatory rhythms at four levels of what they term the performance pyramid.: physical, emotional, mental & spiritual.  We build emotional, mental & spiritual capacity in precisely the same way we build physical capacity. We must systematically expose ourselves to stress beyond our normal limits, followed by adequate recovery.  Emotional depth & resilience depend on active engagement with others & with our own feelings. Mental acuity diminishes in the absence of on-going intellectual challenge.
  • 35. Balancing Stress & Energy  Spiritual energy capacity depends on regularly revisiting our deepest values & holding ourselves accountable in our behaviour.  Full engagement requires cultivating a dynamic balance between the expenditure of energy (stress) & the renewal of energy (recovery) in all dimensions. The authors call this rhythmic wave oscillation, and it represents the fundamental pulse of life.  Expanding capacity requires a willingness to endure short- term discomfort in the service of long-term reward. The key to expanding capacity is both to push beyond one's ordinary limits and to regularly seek recovery, which is when growth actually occurs.
  • 37. Physical Energy- 1/4  Physical energy is the fundamental source of fuel in life, even if our work is almost completely sedentary. It not only lies at the heart of alertness & vitality but also affects our ability to manage our Emotions, Sustain concentration, Think creatively, and even maintain our commitment to whatever mission we are on.  Physical energy is derived from the interaction between oxygen & glucose.  The two most important regulators of physical energy are breathing & eating. The size of our energy reservoir depends on the patterns of our breathing, the foods that we eat & when we eat them, the quantity and quality of our sleep, the degree to which we get intermittent recovery during the day & the level of our fitness.
  • 38. Physical Energy -2/4  The breath is a powerful tool for self regulation- a means to summon energy & to relax deeply.  Extending the exhalation prompts a powerful wave of recovery. Breathing in to a count of three & out to a count of six, lowers arousal & quiets not just the body but also the mind and the emotions.  Eating 5 to 6 low-calorie, highly nutritious meals a day ensures a steady resupply of glucose & essential nutrients. Sustained performance depends not just on eating at regular intervals but also eating only as much as you need to drive your energy for the next 2 to 3 hours. Snacks between meals should typically be between 100 & 150 calories & should focus on low-glycemic foods such as nuts & sunflower seeds, fruits, or half of a typical- size 200 calorie energy bar
  • 39. Examples – Eating-When & how Example 1: Only eating 2 large meals per day Eat every 3 hours +/- 1 hour Never go more than 4 hours without eating! Example 2: Only 3 small meals & 3 small snacks
  • 40. What to Eat  Sustainable energy: low glycemic  Balance of nutrients: physiological needs
  • 41. Physical Energy- 3/4  Drinking 64 ounces of water daily is a key factor in the effective management of physical energy. Inadequate hydration compromises concentration and coordination.  Most human beings require 7 to 8 hours of sleep per night to function optimally. In addition to its energy renewing function, sleep is also a period during which substantial growth & repair occur – most of it at the deepest level of sleep, when slow- wave delta brainwaves are dominant.  Going to bed early and waking up early help to optimize performance.
  • 42. Physical Energy- 4/4  Interval training is more effective than steady-state exercise in building physical capacity & in teaching people how to recover more efficiently.  To sustain full engagement, we must take a recovery break every 90 to 120 minutes. Just as we cycle through levels of sleep at night, so our potential for engagement varies during our waking hours.  Brief periods of rest are crucial to sustaining energy over long hours.
  • 43. 5 Emotional Energy Transforming threat into challenge
  • 44. Emotional Energy- 1/3  Emotional intelligence, from the authors perspective, is simply the capacity to manage emotions skilfully in the service of high positive energy & full engagement.  In order to perform at our best, we must access pleasant & positive emotions; the experience of enjoyment, challenge, adventure and opportunity.  The key muscles fuelling positive energy are self-confidence, self-control, interpersonal effectiveness and empathy.  Access to the emotional muscles that best serve performance depends on creating a balance between exercising them regularly and intermittently seeking recovery. Physical and emotional energy are inextricably connected.
  • 45. Emotional Energy- 2/3  Negative emotions serve survival but they are very costly & energy inefficient in the context of performance. For leaders and managers, negative emotions are doubly insidious, because they are also infectious.  The ability to summon positive emotions during periods of intense stress & to communicate consistently positive energy lies at the heart of effective leadership.  Access to the emotional muscles that serve performance depends on creating a balance between exercising them regularly & intermittently seeking recovery.
  • 46. Emotional Energy- 3/3  The delicate dance of a healthy friendship can be a powerful source both of positive energy & of renewal. The pulse of a strong relationship involves a rhythmic movement between giving & taking, talking and listening, valuing the other person and feeling commensurately valued in return.  Any activity that is enjoyable, fulfilling and affirming serves as a source of emotional renewal and recovery.  Emotional muscles such as patience, empathy & confidence can be strengthened in the same way that we strengthen a bicep or a triceps: pushing past our current limits followed by recovery
  • 47. 6 Mental Energy Appropriate Focus & Realistic Optimism
  • 48. Mental Energy- 1/3  Just as physical energy is the fundamental fuel for emotional competencies, so it is the fuel for mental skills. Mental capacity is what we use to organize our lives and focus our attention. Nothing so interferes with performance and engagement as the inability to concentrate on the task at hand. To perform at our best we must be able to sustain concentration, and to move flexibly between broad & narrow, as well as internal and external focus.  The mental energy that best serves full engagement is realistic optimism . seeing the world as it is, but always working positively towards a desired outcome or solution.
  • 49. Mental Energy- 2/3  The key supportive mental muscles include mental preparation, visualization, positive self-talk, effective time management & creativity.  Changing channels mentally permits different parts of the brain to be activated & facilitates creativity.  Physical exercise stimulates cognitive capacity. It does so by driving more blood and oxygen to the brain  Thinking uses up a lot of energy. The consequences of insufficient mental recovery range from increased mistakes of judgment & execution to lower creativity and a failure to take reasonable account of risks. The key to mental recovery is to give the conscious, thinking mind intermittent rest.
  • 50. Mental Energy- 3/3  Maximum mental capacity is derived from a balance between expending and recovering mental energy.  The highest form of creativity depends on a rhythmic movement between engagement and disengagement, thinking & letting go, activity and rest.  When we lack the mental muscles we need to perform at our best, we must systematically build capacity by pushing past our comfort zone & then recovering.  Continuing to challenge the brain serves as a protection against age-related mental decline
  • 51. 7 Spiritual Energy He who has a why to live
  • 52. Spiritual Energy  Spiritual energy provides the force for action in all dimensions of our lives. It fuels passion, perseverance and commitment.  Spiritual energy is derived from a connection to deeply held values & a purpose beyond our self- interest.  At the practical level, anything that ignites the human spirit serves to drive full engagement & to maximize performance in whatever mission we are on.
  • 53. Spiritual Energy  Character - the courage & conviction to live by our deepest values is the key muscle that serves spiritual energy.  The key supportive spiritual muscles are passion, commitment, integrity and honesty.  Spiritual energy expenditure & energy renewal are deeply interconnected.  Spiritual energy is sustained by balancing a commitment to a purpose beyond ourselves with adequate self-care.  The capacity to live by our deepest values depends on regularly renewing our spirit - seeking ways to rest & rejuvenate & to reconnect with the values that we find most inspiring & meaningful.
  • 55. Defining Purpose- Rules of Engagement  The most compelling source of purpose is spiritual, the energy derived from connecting to deeply held values and a purpose beyond one’s self-interest.  Purpose creates a destination. We become fully engaged only when we care deeply, when we feel that what we are doing really matters. The search for meaning is among the most powerful & enduring themes in every culture since the origin of recorded history.  The “Hero’s journey” is grounded in mobilizing, nurturing & regularly renewing our most precious resource, energy, in the service of what matter most.
  • 56. Defining Purpose- Rules of Engagement  Purpose fuels focus, direction, passion & perseverance.  When we lack a strong purpose we are easily buffeted by life’s inevitable storms.  Purpose becomes a more powerful & enduring source of energy when its source moves from negative to positive, external to internal & self to others.  A negative source of purpose is defensive & deficit- based. Purpose fuelled by the feeling of deficit also narrows our attention & limits our possibilities.  Intrinsic motivation grows out of the desire to engage in an activity because we value it for the inherent satisfaction it provides.
  • 57. Defining Purpose- Rules of Engagement  Values fuel the energy on which purpose is built. They hold us to a different standard for managing our energy. A value is ultimately just a roadmap for action.  Values we fail to reflect in our behaviour are ultimately empty.  A value in action is a virtue. Alignment occurs when we transform our values into virtues. Simply identifying our primary values is not sufficient. The next step is to define more precisely how we intend to embody the values in our daily lives, regardless of external pressures
  • 58. Face the Truth- How are you managing your energy now ?  Facing the truth about the gap between who we want to be & who we really are is never easy. Each of us has an infinite capacity for self-deception.  Facing the truth frees up energy & is the second stage, after defining purpose, in becoming fully engaged.  Avoiding the truth consumes great effort and energy.  At the most basic level, we deceive ourselves in order to protect our self-esteem. We each have our own well- funded defence department.  We do things like numb out, rationalize against the truth & intellectualize as a means of acknowledging the truth cognitively without experiencing its impact emotionally
  • 59. Face the Truth- How are you managing your energy now ?  Some truths are too unbearable to be absorbed all at once. Emotions such as grief are best metabolized in waves.  Truth without compassion is cruelty, to others & to ourselves.  What we fail to acknowledge about ourselves we often continue to act out unconsciously.  A common form of self-deception is assuming that our view represents the truth, when it is really just a lens through which we choose to view the world. It is really just an interpretation.  Facing the truth requires that we retain an on-going openness to the possibility that we may not be seeing ourselves, or others, accurately
  • 60. Face the Truth- How are you managing your energy now ?  Facing the truth requires making yourself the object of inquiry - conducting an audit of your life & holding yourself accountable for the energy consequences of your behaviours.  It is both a danger & a delusion when we become too identified with a singular view of ourselves. We are all a blend of light and shadow, virtues and vices.  Accepting our limitations reduces our defensiveness & increases the amount of positive energy available to us.  The Serenity Prayer is a perfect primer on ideal energy management: God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; & the wisdom to know the difference. We spend vast amounts of energy worrying about people & situations over which we have no control. Far better to concentrate our energy on that which we can influence.
  • 61. Taking action- The Power of Positive Rituals  Rituals serve as tools through which we effectively manage energy in the service of whatever mission we are on.  Rituals create a means by which we translate our values & priorities into action in all dimensions of our life.  All great performers rely on positive rituals to manage their energy & regulate their behavior  The limitations of conscious will & discipline are rooted in the fact that every demand on our self control draws on the same limited resources  We can off-set our limited will & discipline by building rituals that become as automatic as quickly as possible , fueled by our deepest values.  The most important role of rituals is to insure effective balance between energy expenditure & energy renewal in the service of full engagement.
  • 62. Taking action- The Power of Positive Rituals  The most exacting challenge and the greater the pressure, the more rigorous our rituals need to be. The bigger the storm, the more inclined we are to revert to our survival habits, & the more important positive rituals become.  Precision & specificity are critical dimensions of building rituals during the thirty-to sixty-day acquisition period. The specificity & precision of rituals also makes it more likely that we will be able to produce them under pressure.  It also helps to assure that our rituals themselves remain fuelled by our deepest values.  By building a ritual to regularly revisit our vision we can insure a strong, continuing connection to the source of energy such a statement provides.  Far from precluding spontaneity, rituals provide a level of comfort, continuity and security that frees us to improvise and to take risks
  • 63. Key take away/ Bear in mind  Managing energy, not time, is the fundamental currency of high performance. Performance is grounded in the skillful management of energy.  Great leaders are stewards of organizational energy. They begin by effectively managing their own energy. As leaders, they must mobilize, focus, invest, channel, renew, and expand the energy of others.  Full engagement is the energy state that best serves performance.  Review the Four Principles.  Making change – 3 steps process
  • 64. Decide where you want to be
  • 65. Happy Reading, Learning & Application Mail your comments to ramaddster@gmail.com