ATTRACTIONS

PREPARED BY: MA'AM
L
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

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

where the main purpose is sightseeing
A
permanent
established
excursion
destination
Primary purpose is to all...
Acc to PEARCE (1991)
“a tourist attraction is a named site with
specific human or natural feature which is
the focus of vi...
CLASSIFICATION
OF
ATTRACTIONS
TYPE




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


Historical house
Museums and galleries
Wildlife attractions
Castles
Gardens
Steam railways
Visitor...
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT





Natural environment
Built made and adapted but not originally
designed for visitor purposes
B...
OWNERSHIP




Attraction are owned and managed by a range of
organizations, trusts and individuals, working in
the publi...
PERCEPTION


Some visitors may perceive an attraction as an
atttraction but others may not.

Acc to MILLAR (1999)
-what u...
ADMISSION POLICY




Attractions operated by membership subscription
organizations allow members in for no charge.
Other...
APPEAL




The market appeal of attractions can be viewed
at a geographic level, where attractions might
appeal: just to...
SIZE AND CAPACITY




Attractions vary in land coverage, with some
housed in tiny buildings and others covering
several ...






ENVIRONMENTAL – physical space and no.
of people in a particular space
ECOLOGICAL – threshold measure, which if
e...
COMPOSITION




Many attractions are nodal in character, located at
or around a specific point or feature
Events may als...
DEGREE OF PERFORMANCE




In case of events and festivals, a short duration is
expected and temporary sites, buildings o...
INFLUENCES
DETERMINING
THE SUCCESS OF
VISITOR
ATTRACTIONS









Professional management skills and the
operator's available resources
Type of attraction or product offerin...








Provision and quality of on-site amenities –
parking, visitor centers, signs and labels, shops,
guides, refres...
THEMES AND
ISSUES IN THE
MANAGEMENT OF
VISITOR
ATTRACTIONS
DEMAND FACTORS:
- desirability of visiting
- repeat visiting
- created interests
- individual preference
- popularity of a...
PERSONAL FACTORS:
- time available
- visiting companions
- health
- mobility
- pleasure derived
experience
- knowledge
per...
Management planning

Environmental impacts

Seasonality

Visitor numbers

Attractions and destination
planning

Diver...
FUTURE OF
VISITOR
ATTRACTIONS
Management: revenue
generation

Marketing

Product development: creating
world class destinations

Interpretation and
c...
MOVING
TOWARDS
TECHNOLOGYBASED ELEMENTS
OF ATTRACTIONS
Creating a unique product

Enhancing the visitor experience

Competition

Managing visitors

Systems management

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Attractions

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Attractions

  1. 1. ATTRACTIONS PREPARED BY: MA'AM L
  2. 2.      where the main purpose is sightseeing A permanent established excursion destination Primary purpose is to allow access for entertainment, interest or education Must be open to the public without prior booking Capable of attracting day visitors or tourists as well as the local residents
  3. 3. Acc to PEARCE (1991) “a tourist attraction is a named site with specific human or natural feature which is the focus of visitor and management attention” Acc to SWARBROOKE (2002) “attractions are generally single units based on a single key feature... destination are larger areas that include a number of individual attractions”
  4. 4. CLASSIFICATION OF ATTRACTIONS
  5. 5. TYPE          Historical house Museums and galleries Wildlife attractions Castles Gardens Steam railways Visitor centers Country parks Leisure parks
  6. 6. PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT    Natural environment Built made and adapted but not originally designed for visitor purposes Built environment and designed for visitor purpose
  7. 7. OWNERSHIP   Attraction are owned and managed by a range of organizations, trusts and individuals, working in the public, private and not-for profit sectors. A high level of state involvement in attraction funding is evident across Europe and in other parts of the world like Canada and Singapore.
  8. 8. PERCEPTION  Some visitors may perceive an attraction as an atttraction but others may not. Acc to MILLAR (1999) -what undeniably turns a tract of land, monument, park, historic house or coastline into a heritage attraction is often the attitude of the public-
  9. 9. ADMISSION POLICY   Attractions operated by membership subscription organizations allow members in for no charge. Other attractions operate friends' schemes, which allow subscribers free entry. Voluntary donations are requested in other attractions.
  10. 10. APPEAL   The market appeal of attractions can be viewed at a geographic level, where attractions might appeal: just to local market, regionally, nationally or internationally. Certain attractions may only appeal to niche markets, or particular market segments
  11. 11. SIZE AND CAPACITY   Attractions vary in land coverage, with some housed in tiny buildings and others covering several hectares. Understanding the capacity of sites is important in terms of management and marketing, as well as protection of the resource base, which may be damaged as a result of poor visitor management.
  12. 12.    ENVIRONMENTAL – physical space and no. of people in a particular space ECOLOGICAL – threshold measure, which if exceeded will lead to actual damage of habitat PERCEPTUAL – level of crowding that a tourist is willing to tolerate before deciding to go elsewhere.
  13. 13. COMPOSITION   Many attractions are nodal in character, located at or around a specific point or feature Events may also be nodal, fixed in one venue, or may occur at a variety of locations as part of a festival.
  14. 14. DEGREE OF PERFORMANCE   In case of events and festivals, a short duration is expected and temporary sites, buildings or a mobile infrastucture are often used. Sporadic non-permanent natural events, which are neither designed nor staged for visitors can also attract substantial visitor interest.
  15. 15. INFLUENCES DETERMINING THE SUCCESS OF VISITOR ATTRACTIONS
  16. 16.       Professional management skills and the operator's available resources Type of attraction or product offering Market demand for the product Ease of access from major routes and centers of tourist and resident populations Appropriate hours of opening Value for money
  17. 17.     Provision and quality of on-site amenities – parking, visitor centers, signs and labels, shops, guides, refreshments, toilets, litter bins, seating and disabled provision Proximity to and quality of near-site amenities, such as signposting, local accommodation, local services and other attractions Quality of service, including staff appearance, attitude, behavior and competence The mood, expectation, behavior and attitude of visitors
  18. 18. THEMES AND ISSUES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF VISITOR ATTRACTIONS
  19. 19. DEMAND FACTORS: - desirability of visiting - repeat visiting - created interests - individual preference - popularity of attraction type - cultural capital attained by visiting SUPPLY FACTORS - opening times - number of attractions open - geographical location - competing attractions - costs and prices - marketing of attraction ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: - weather at time of visit - distance to travel - setting of attraction
  20. 20. PERSONAL FACTORS: - time available - visiting companions - health - mobility - pleasure derived experience - knowledge perception SITE-SPECIFIC FACTORS - physical availability of visitor services - quality of visitor services - visitor welcome - staff attitude - events - ambiance - information -crowding levels EXTERNAL FACTORS: - public sector tourism support and development - place marketing and regional marketing - visitor infrastructure in area - roads and signages
  21. 21. Management planning  Environmental impacts  Seasonality  Visitor numbers  Attractions and destination planning  Diversification  Renewal and innovation  Harnessing economic impacts 
  22. 22. FUTURE OF VISITOR ATTRACTIONS
  23. 23. Management: revenue generation  Marketing  Product development: creating world class destinations  Interpretation and communication 
  24. 24. MOVING TOWARDS TECHNOLOGYBASED ELEMENTS OF ATTRACTIONS
  25. 25. Creating a unique product  Enhancing the visitor experience  Competition  Managing visitors  Systems management 

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