Classroom makeover day 4

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Classroom makeover day 4

  1. 1. What is Tiering?<br />One form of differentiation.  <br />Ensures that students with different learning needs work with the same essential ideas and use the same key skills but at different levels of <br /><ul><li>Complexity
  2. 2. Abstractness
  3. 3. Open-endedness</li></ul>Tomlinson, C. (1995).  The Differentiated Classroom. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.<br />
  4. 4. 2nd Grade Math<br />This lesson is tiered in content according to interest.<br />Tier I: Whales Is a Blue Whale the Biggest Thing There Is?(0-8075-3656-3)<br />Tier II: Millions How Much Is a Million? (0-688-09933-5)<br />Tier III: Pandas Dinner at the Panda Palace(0-06-443408-7)<br />Tier IV: Bunnies Bunches and Bunches of Bunnies (0-590-44766-1)<br />Tier V: Lifetimes Lifetimes (1-883220-59-9)<br /> <br />Each student reads or listens to their selected book and writes a paragraph describing the whole numbers used in the story. Students should identify the smallest and largest number in the story. In addition, they should write a sentence or two about any number relationships which are given in the story. Among students who read the same book, have students share their results.<br /> <br />http://ideanet.doe.state.in.us/exceptional/gt/tiered_curriculum/welcome.html<br />
  5. 5. Creating Multiple Paths for Learning<br />Key Concept<br />or<br />Understanding<br />Struggling<br />With The<br />Concept<br />Some<br />Understanding<br />Understand<br />The<br />Concept<br />Understand<br />The<br />Concept<br />Reaching Back<br />Reaching Ahead<br />READINESS LEVELS<br />
  6. 6. Guidelines for Developing Tiered Instruction<br /><ul><li>Think about the students who will be using the activity in terms of their readiness,interests, orlearning profile.
  7. 7. Create one activity that is interesting, requires high-level thinking and is clearly focused on the key concept, skill or generalization.</li></li></ul><li>8th Grade Language Arts Example<br />Objectives<br /><ul><li>The students will identify the elements of short stories, such as internal and external conflict, irony, plot, climax, characterization, & setting.</li></ul>Level 1<br />Create a chart or other graphic organizer that identifies the elements of short stories in this story.<br />Level 2<br />Rewrite the ending of this study. What will happen now? How will choices impact the outcome? <br />FOUNDATIONAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRANSFORMATIONAL<br />
  8. 8. Which tier is which?<br />What is the concept?<br />
  9. 9. Is this lesson tiered by content, process, or product?<br />
  10. 10. Is this lesson tiered by interest, learning style, or readiness? <br />
  11. 11. 4th Grade Math<br />This lesson is tiered in product according to readiness.<br /> <br />Tier I: Basic Learners<br />Pairs of students are given a set of “real-number” cards and a blank Venn diagram which has three overlapping circles labeled as follows: numbers greater then 1½, numbers less than 3.5, and numbers between 0 and 15. Students write each number in the appropriate circle.<br />Tier II: Grade Level Learners<br />Pairs of students are given a set of “real-number” cards and a blank Venn diagram which has three overlapping circles which are not labeled. Students must sort their cards and decide on labels for each of the circles. Then students write each number in the appropriate circle.<br />Tier III: Advanced Learners<br />Pairs of students are given a set of “real-number” cards and a blank number line. Students must sort their cards and decide where to place each on the number line. Students complete the lesson by writing each number on the number line. <br />http://ideanet.doe.state.in.us/exceptional/gt/tiered_curriculum/welcome.html<br />
  12. 12. IDENTIFY OUTCOMES<br />WHAT SHOULD THE STUDENTS KNOW, UNDERSTAND, OR BE ABLE TO DO?<br />THINK ABOUT YOUR STUDENTS<br />PRE-ASSESS READINESS, INTEREST, OR LEARNING PROFILE<br />INITIATING ACTIVITIES<br />USE AS COMMON EXPERIENCE FOR WHOLE CLASS<br />GROUP 1<br />TASK<br />GROUP 3<br />TASK<br />GROUP 2<br />TASK<br />
  13. 13. Creating a Tiered Lesson<br />1. Identify the grade level and subject for which you will write the lesson.<br />2. Identify the standard (national, state, district, etc.) that you are targeting.<br />3. Identify the key concept and generalization.<br />
  14. 14. Creating a Tiered Lesson<br />4. Determine which area you will tier.<br /><ul><li>Content: what you want the students to learn
  15. 15. Process: the way students make sense of the content
  16. 16. Product: the outcome at the end of a lesson, lesson set, or unit (often a project)</li></li></ul><li>Creating a Tiered Lesson<br />5. Determine the type of tiering you will do:<br />Readiness is based on the ability levels of the students.<br />Interest is based on their interest in a topic, generally gauged through an interest survey.<br />Learning profile may be determined through various learning style inventories. <br />
  17. 17. Creating a Tiered Lesson<br />6. Determine how many tiers you will need and develop the lesson.<br />Option A: Tier according to readiness.<br /><ul><li> At grade level
  18. 18. Above grade level.
  19. 19. Below grade level</li></li></ul><li>Creating a Tiered Lesson<br />7. Determine how many tiers you will need and develop the lesson.<br />Option B: Tier by interest.<br />Control the number of tiers by limiting choices or using a few different learning styles.<br />
  20. 20. The “Equalizer”<br />1. Foundational Transformational<br />5. Smaller Leap Greater Leap<br />6. More Structured More Open<br />2. Concrete Abstract<br />7. Clearly Defined Problems Fuzzy Problems<br />3. Simple Complex<br />8. Less Independence Greater Independence<br />4. Fewer Facets Multi-facets<br />9. Slower Quicker<br />Based on the work of Carol Ann Tomlinson<br />
  21. 21. Primary Objectives / Topics / Skills<br />
  22. 22. What Can Be Tiered?<br /><ul><li>Assignments
  23. 23. Activities
  24. 24. Homework
  25. 25. Learning Centers
  26. 26. Experiments
  27. 27. Materials
  28. 28. Assessments
  29. 29. Writing Prompts</li></li></ul><li>Management Tips<br /><ul><li>The number of tiers will depend on the range in the classroom.
  30. 30. Form tiers based on assessment of your students’ abilities to handle the material.
  31. 31. Students are re-grouped the next time you use tiering as a strategy.
  32. 32. Match the task's degree of difficulty and its pacing to student readiness.</li></li></ul><li>Tiering by Interest<br /><ul><li>Look at student characteristics other than ability level.
  33. 33. Teachers give all students choices of content, process, or product that are at approximately the same ability level.
  34. 34. These tiers are similar to those in a layer cake—all the same size.</li></li></ul><li>Group Sizes May Vary<br /><ul><li>The number of groups per tier will vary.
  35. 35. The number of students per tier will vary.
  36. 36. Form groups based on the readiness needs of individual students.
  37. 37. Tier One may have two groups of three students, Tier Two five groups of four students, and Tier Three may have one group of two students. </li>

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