Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Is there a link between extra curricular clubs and attendance

774 views

Published on

Output from Amy Doonan as part of MSc research.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Is there a link between extra curricular clubs and attendance

  1. 1. Combatting School Absenteeism Getting Pupil Premium Pupils To Stay In School Lead researcher: Miss Amy Doonan, BA, PGCE amy.doonan@education.ox.ac.uk Supervisor: Mrs Laura Molway, BA, PGCE, MSc laura.molway@education.ox.ac.uk Rational: “School attendance is the most basic foundation of academic and social success.” (Sutphen et al. 2010: 168) Absenteeism threatens myriad deleterious outcomes for youth, not least for those from disadvantaged backgrounds, and often results in lower academic achievement, delinquency, substance abuse and risky behaviour. It is often a precursor for mental health issues that continue into adulthood. It is therefore imperative that schools identify and address the causes of absenteeism in order to intervene before these problems take root. Literature: Attendance Existing studies suggest that the most effective school based interventions • employ tangible rewards such as token based economies • encourage parental engagement through meetings and regular communication • support pupils, encourage responsibility and foster cooperation through relationship building initiatives and the use of contracts School Connectedness “A crucial requirement for student health and well-being: [is] the need to feel like one belongs to and is cared for at school.” (McNeely et al. 2002: 145) Extra Curricular Participation “Engagement in constructive non- academic activities facilitates school engagement and achievement as well as other aspects of positive adolescent development.” (Ang et al. 2014: 776) Preliminary Findings: 1. A strong positive correlation was found between participation in extra-curricular clubs and perceived levels of teacher support (r = 0.99, n = 301, p = <.02) 2. A strong positive correlation was found between participation in extra-curricular clubs and school attendance (r = 1, n = 308, p = <.01) 3. A strong positive correlation was found between participation in extra-curricular clubs and pupil happiness in school (r = 1, n = 317, p = <.01) 4. 64% of pupils who attend extra-curricular clubs have made new friends through them (n=109), 62% of which are now friends with them outside the club too (n=68) Key References: Ang, R. P., Farihah, N., & Lau, S. (2014). An outcome evaluation of the implementation of the Outward Bound Singapore five-day “intercept” program. Journal of Adolescence, 37(6), 771–778. Fischer, N., & Theis, D. (2014). Extracurricular participation and the development of school attachment and learning goal orientation: the impact of school quality. Developmental Psychology, 50(6), 1788–1793. Fredricks, J. A., & Eccles, J. S. (2006). Is extracurricular participation associated with beneficial outcomes? Concurrent and longitudinal relations. Developmental Psychology, 42(4), 698–713. Kearney, C. a. (2008). School absenteeism and school refusal behavior in youth: A contemporary review. Clinical Psychology Review. (7), 262–274. Klem, A. M., & Connell, J. P. (2004). Linking Teacher Support to Student Engagement and Achievement, 74(7), 262–274. McNeely, C. A., Nonnemaker, J. M., & Blum, R. W. (2002). Promoting school connectedness: evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Journal of School Health, 72(4), 138–146. Sutphen, R. D., Ford, J. P., & Flaherty, C. (2010). Truancy Interventions: A Review of the Research Literature. Research on Social Work Practice, 20(2), 161–171. Project Milestones: Aug-Sep Literature review & planning phase 1 Oct-Dec Intervention implemented Jan-Mar Intervention on-going, 2nd & 3rd phases of literature review (school connectedness & extra-curricular club participation), mid-cycle evaluation of project, planning phase 2 (KS3 questionnaire) Apr-May Questionnaire prototypes, pupil & staff interviews Jun-Jul Data collection, analysis, evaluation & dissemination of findings Next steps: • Compute Fisher’s exact test to assess the relationship between other variables where sample sizes are <5 • Analyse the effects of extra-curricular club participation on PP cohort • Analyse free-text responses from KS3 Questionnaire • Analyse PP Intervention Group interview transcripts and attendance diary pages • Compare and contrast my findings with existing literature • Share my findings with colleagues and local board of Educational Psychologists Research Hypotheses: 1. Exposure to a supportive intervention will result in a. higher levels of perceived teacher support b. higher levels of happiness in school c. higher school attendance figures 2. Participation in extra-curricular clubs will result in a. higher levels of perceived teacher support b. higher levels of happiness in school c. higher school attendance figures The Intervention: Weekly 30 minute meetings of PP pupils with Year Group Leader to monitor and discuss attendance issues and share supportive strategies.

×