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J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
A Quiet Culture War in
Research Libraries
Rick Anderson
Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources...
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
Print  Online
• Objects  access
• Individual  collective
• Institutional  global
• Simple ...
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
Issues at play
• Access
• Costs
• Rights
• Funding
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
Local vs. global responsibilities
• Not mutually exclusive, but in tension
– Big Deal
– OA pro...
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
Soldiers and Revolutionaries
• Soldiers focus on
– Local needs
– Current impact
– Alignment wi...
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
What is to be done?
• Surface the issue
– What is our library’s local-global balance now?
• As...
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
Bottom line
• Soldiers are employees
• Revolutionaries are (usually) freelance
J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
Thank you!
rick.anderson@utah.edu
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UKSG webinar: A Quiet Culture War in Research Libraries, and What It Means for Libraries, Researchers, and Publishers with Rick Anderson, University of Utah

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There is a growing rift between those who believe the library's most fundamental purpose is to support and advance the goals of its host institution and those who believe the library's most important role is as an agent of progress and reform in the larger world of scholarly communication. Although these two areas of endeavor are not mutually exclusive, they are in competition for scarce resources and the choices made between them have serious implications at both the micro level (for the patrons and institutions served by each library) and the macro level (for members of the larger academic community).

The tension between these two worldviews is creating friction within librarianship itself: as tightening budgets increasingly force us to choose between worthy programs and projects, there is growing conflict between those whose choices reflect one worldview and those who hold to the other. How this conflict plays out over the next few years may have significant implications for the scholars who depend on libraries for access to research content and for the publishers and other vendors for whom libraries are a core customer base.

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UKSG webinar: A Quiet Culture War in Research Libraries, and What It Means for Libraries, Researchers, and Publishers with Rick Anderson, University of Utah

  1. 1. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY A Quiet Culture War in Research Libraries Rick Anderson Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections rick.anderson@utah.edu
  2. 2. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY Print  Online • Objects  access • Individual  collective • Institutional  global • Simple issues  complex • Toll access  open access
  3. 3. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY Issues at play • Access • Costs • Rights • Funding
  4. 4. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY Local vs. global responsibilities • Not mutually exclusive, but in tension – Big Deal – OA program memberships – OA mandates – APC subventions – ILL vs. short-term loan
  5. 5. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY Soldiers and Revolutionaries • Soldiers focus on – Local needs – Current impact – Alignment with institutional mission – Support and service • Revolutionaries focus on – Global needs – Long-term impact – Solving global/systemic problems – Leadership and education
  6. 6. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
  7. 7. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY
  8. 8. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY What is to be done? • Surface the issue – What is our library’s local-global balance now? • Assess alignment – How does it fit our institution’s goals? • Address any disparity – Talk to the provost/VP • Consider influencing institutional mission/culture – If feasible, create a strategy for doing so – If not, realign the library
  9. 9. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY Bottom line • Soldiers are employees • Revolutionaries are (usually) freelance
  10. 10. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY Thank you! rick.anderson@utah.edu

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