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Tabor 100 February 2019 Newsletter

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Tabor 100 February 2019 Newsletter

General Meeting Photos courtesy of Keith Williams, Flyright Productions
Newsletter Graphic Design and Editing, Kalea Perry

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Tabor 100 February 2019 Newsletter

  1. 1. 1 February 2019 Whew! February is almost done, and we will soon be moving into Spring! As the seasons change, we foster hope and encouragement that our emotional, social and economic fortunes will change for the better. It is important to understand that all three are wrapped up in each other -- you feel better if your economic situation is improved. To that end, I want to emphasize the reason Tabor 100 was created, but also, why it is especially important now to improve the economic conditions of the minority community, especially the African American community. Both the creation of the Business Development HUB (formerly Economic Empowerment Center) and the passage in the Legislature of I-1000 are critical to improving our economic situation. A recent Seattle Times article laid out our economic condition in very stark terms. What we are paid means less than our long-term net worth. The same is true about what we spend – we can spend whatever, but the real key to our future and that of our kids and others in our community is what we have in the bank or the brokerage, the real estate we own, the appreciable assets that make up our overall worth. Bolstering this net worth is really what we, as an minority economic engine, are about. Overall, one of the best ways to improve net worth is through successful business ownership, the basics of both the Business Development HUB and passage of I-1000. The Seattle Times article states that in King and Snohomish counties the average net worth of a household is $399,000. In fact, it goes on to say that we are living in one of the “richest places in the nation.” The median a household net worth among more than 100 metro areas that make up the U.S., is $110,000, so we almost quadruple that number, ranking us tenth in net worth nationwide. Unfortunately, the wealth that is touted in the first part of the article only does not extend equally by race. For Latinos living in our region, their net a household worth is around $90,000. For African Americans, their a household net worth is about $23,000. It seems that the economic “good times” as I have stated in previous articles, are not apparent for either Latino or African American households. It seems that the one differentiator is home ownership, a product of income generation. Those who are making money, through business and otherwise, can afford a home and that factor alone allows them and their family to prosper economically. Interestingly, among African Americans nationwide, this regions African American households have has a lower homeownership rate. The Seattle Times article is alarming and another reminder of why we at Tabor 100 are doing the work we are doing. I again implore you to join us and want to assure you that we will keep it up with the goal of changing these numbers for the better. Message from the President Vision Becomes Reality Tabor 100 is an association of entrepreneurs and business advocates who are committed to economic power, educational excellence and social equity for African-Americans and the community at large. 3 January GM Photos Page 2 January GM Recap Page 3- 4 Educator Diversity Page 4-5 Get the newsletter online and stay connected through social media!
  2. 2. 2 January 2019 General Meeting
  3. 3. 3 WHAT YOU MISSED – TABOR 100 JANUARY 2019 GENERAL MEETING I-1000 This topic led the discussion at the General meeting with former State Representative Jesse Wineberry giving an update on the progress of the Initiative. He confirmed that it received more than 390,000 signatures, more than any other initiative to the Legislature has ever gotten. He explained that the Legislature can approve the initiative “as is” and it would become law or it could come up with an alternative that would be placed on the ballot in November or simply not act on I-1000, which would automatically place it on the ballot. His assessment of a vote in the Legislature was positive. He also issued an appeal for funding to help pay the Initiative’s signature gatherers. CAPITOL HILL HOUSING (CHH) CEO Chris Persons talked about the Liberty Bank Building, which opens March 23rd . The project achieved 30% WMBE participation. Three African American businesses have been slated for occupancy in the building including Earls’ Cuts and Styles, an iconic central-area barbershop; That Brown Girl Cooks!, opening its first retail outlet after many years of catering in the Puget Sound region; and a coffee shop, owned and operated by an African American. Persons talked about Capitol Hill Housing’s’ partnership with Africatown Community Land Trust, Byrd Barr Place and Black Community Impact Alliance. The Coalition is called RISE Together. He also touted a new building on 14th and Union and the fact that CHH owns and operates 51 properties in which there are opportunities for construction and maintenance. He also mentioned that it is engaged in 6+ new projects that also present opportunities for Tabor 100 members. Lastly, he announced that Capitol Hill Housing is seeking candidates for a VP of Properties position. SKANSKA Skanska announced that it has secured the contract to build the new Highline High School in the Burien area which will cost $108 million. Margo@skanska.com is the contact person for the project. Continued on Page 3
  4. 4. 4 CITY OF SEATTLE PRIORITY HIRE Liz Alzeer and Rick Dimmer from the City of Seattle talked about the $67 billion in construction opportunities that are coming to the region over the next two decades and the need to find minority workers to complete them. Rick talked about several aspects of the City of Seattle’s Priority Hire Program and the ability for minority workers to gain valuable skills that can be used in other public works projects. He specifically noted opportunities with the City’s Waterfront Project and Key Arena, but also mentioned that there are many smaller projects in need of workers. The City’s objective with these projects is to drive employment and minority business capacity within minority communities. He talked about several aspects of the city’s WMBE (Women, Minority Business Enterprises) and employment programs including college credit features, Labor and Industries Training requirements and the fact that the city is focusing on recruitment, training and retention of workers. Rick can be reached at Rick.Dimmer@seattle.gov. DES DISPARITY STUDY/I-1000 Chris Liu, Director of the State Department of Enterprise Services, talked about the Governor’s strong support for I-1000 and the Administration’s efforts to be a leader in helping making it a reality through a vote in the Legislature this year. In addition, Chris mentioned the upcoming DES Disparity study, which he indicated would be made public in February. WHAT YOU MISSED – TABOR 100 JANUARY 2019 GENERAL MEETING Continued from Page 2
  5. 5. 5 ‘I’ve never had a black teacher’: Seattle-area students share how educators’ lack of diversity affects them By: Mohammed Kloub -- Seattle Times Originally published February 15, 2019 We’re giving students the last word in the final installment of our teacher-diversity series. In case you missed it, we began with a big endeavor to quantify the issue in our state: “To fully represent today’s students, about 29,500 of Washington’s 64,700 teachers would have to be people of color,” we reported. We then shared promising approaches to recruiting and keeping more teachers of color from two regions of the state, the Puget Sound and Southwest Washington. In the last few weeks, we’ve been sharing responses from Washington teachers and students to the representation gap and our reporting. We started with one round of responses from educators, another round from students and a second one from teachers. For the final piece, we’re sharing the experiences of those most directly affected once more: students. Here’s what we asked them: • Do you feel your race has ever affected the way teachers interact with you? How? • Do you think it’s important to have teachers who come from a similar background as you? Why or why not? Have you ever had a teacher who was the same race as you? How did it affect your experience in that class? Because many of these students are minors, we are only identifying them by their first names. Here’s what a few had to say. Aminah, a high-school senior who identified as black, doesn’t believe her race has ever affected the way educators interact with her, saying she has “always had good relationships” with teachers. Despite her own good relationships, Aminah still stressed that it’s “highly important” for students to have teachers of similar backgrounds they can relate to. When it comes to students misbehaving in class, for instance, Aminah said teachers of color try to deal with it directly, whereas white teachers in her experience “automatically send a student out of class.” “Sadly, I’ve never had a black teacher … I had a black [substitute teacher] back when I was a freshman for three days and I realize when I had the black sub I felt even more comfortable in my learning and even enjoyed it,” Aminah wrote. “I understood the content better. I felt comfortable because it was a teacher who talked like me, and taught in a way I can understand.” Josie, an eighth-grade student in Seattle, identified as white and said her race has definitely affected how teachers interact with her. “I am white and have noticed that when I do well on something teachers are more likely to congratulate me than my friends of color who also did well,” Josie wrote. “I have also noticed in my language-arts class (which is predominantly black) when we have subs who are white they are more likely to ask me for help than students of color.” Continued on Page 6
  6. 6. 6 “Almost all of my teachers have been white,” Josie continued. “I have found that the few teachers of color I have had make more of an effort to relate to students and be there for students.” Leonel, an eighth-grader from Tacoma, identified as Mexican and Salvadorian and said he’s had three teachers of color since kindergarten. “We talked the same language and we had some stuff in common,” he wrote. “Sometimes it makes me think that other students or adults [of color] would be able to become a teacher.” Maddie, another eighth-grader, identified as half white and half African American. She is one of the few black students in her Highly Capable Cohort, or gifted program, she said. “I tend to feel that teachers don’t prioritize my learning as much as white students,” Maddie wrote. “I don’t think I’ve ever had a biracial teacher and it has made it very difficult for me to connect to the curriculum in any class.” Mariam, a high-school senior who identified as black and Middle Eastern, said she often feels uncomfortable talking with her white teachers outside of class. “It’s due to the racist comments students make with those same teachers in class, and they do not call it out,” she wrote. “White teachers act as if they don’t hear racist comments being directed at students of color in their presence.” Mariam went on to say she has had one teacher with the same racial background as her, and he routinely told his students to come to him if they ever experienced racist incidents in school. She felt more at ease in his class, she said, and her grades even went up. “We, as students, are told to talk to adults about harassment,” Mariam wrote. “However, white teachers don’t seem to care about racist harassment in schools. I would feel more at ease talking to adults about racist comments if they were able to share my experiences.” Queshdah, a Colville Native American alumnus of Seattle schools, said meeting a Native American teacher made a huge difference in high school. “It was important for me to learn things only she could teach because of her experiences, and the things she was taught,” Queshdah wrote. “It was culturally grounding to have a Native teacher who could genuinely give me and others a safe place to explore where they come from, and what it means to each student to be Native.” WELCOME NEW MEMBERS Michaela Doelman, DES Ceceille Nguyen, 360 Adviser Team Kendrick Stewart, DES ‘I’ve never had a black teacher’: Seattle-area students share how educators’ lack of diversity affects them By: Mohammed Kloub -- Seattle Times Originally published February 15, 2019 Continued from Page 5
  7. 7. 7 INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR BUSINESS HIGHLIGHTED IN THE NEWSLETTER? DROP AN EMAIL TO Staff@Tabor100.org or PublicAffairs@Tabor100.org OR CALL (425) 882-4800 Ext. 107
  8. 8. 8 THE TABOR 100 BOARD President: Ollie Garrett President@Tabor100.org Vice President: Brian Sims VP@Tabor100.org Treasurer: Aundrea Jackson Treasurer@Tabor100.org Secretary: Sherlita Kennedy Secretary@Tabor100.org Membership: Vacant Membership@Tabor100.org Education: Kevin C. Washington Education@Tabor100.org Public Affairs: Henry Yates PublicAffairs@Tabor100.org Economic Development: Manal al-Ansi EconomicDevelopment@Tabor100.org Government Affairs: David Hackney GovernmentAffairs@Tabor100.org Fund Development: Abdul Yusuf FundDevelopment@Tabor100.org Business Development: Anthony Burnett BusinessDev@Tabor100.org TABOR OFFICE 2330 130th Ave. NE #101 Bellevue, WA 98005 425-882-4800 x 107 Staff@Tabor100.org Newsletter Graphic Design and Editor: Kalea Perry, KaleaPerry@Hotmail.com General Meeting Photos Courtesy of Keith Williams Flyright Productions, Flyrightproductions.net, 206-860-9813 WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO REACH OUT! UPCOMING EVENTS Feb. 23: Tabor 100 General Meeting, 10am-12pm, Central Area Senior Center March 5: Sound Transit Drop In, 11am-12pm, Sound Transit Headquarters March 13: UW Supplier Orientation, 1pm-2:30pm, UW Seattle Campus Roosevelt Commons West. March 14 & 15: Gov’t Cost Accounting Seminar, 8am-4pm, Sound Transit. March 18 & 19: Creating Gov’t Cost Proposals, 8am-4pm, Sound Transit. March 20: Downtown Redmond Light Rail Link Pre-Proposal Meeting, 10am-2pm, Redmond Community Center, Marymoor Village March 21: 2019 City of Seattle Upcoming Conslultant Business Opportunities Forum, 8am-12pm, Seattle City Hall– Bertha Knight Landes Room. March 30: Tabor 100 General Meeting, 10am-12pm, Central Area Senior Center COMMITTEE MEETINGS Feb. 23 & March 30: Education Committee meets after the Tabor General Meeting, from 12-2pm at the Central Area Senior Center Combined Library and Computer Room
  9. 9. Technical Assistance Services City of Seattle – Request for Proposal Due Date: March 14, 2019, 3:00 PM The City of Seattle is seeking to contract with an organization to provide procurement and contracting-related technical assistance services to firms interested in doing business with the City of Seattle in a prime or subcontracting capacity, with specific focus on WMBE firms, and providing reporting and outcome information to the City. The scope of technical assistance services may include, but not be limited to the following areas: • Providing firms with assistance navigating the City of Seattle contracting processes, including business and contract requirements, • Provide guidance to firms to understand requirements for responding to purchasing and construction bids, responding to RFPs/RFQs, contract negotiation principles, • Provide business development assistance, • Provide Outreach/Recruitment services, and • Reporting. For RFP documents and more information please visit https://consultants.seattle.gov/2019/02/07/technical- assistance-services-fas-rfp-2019-001/ City of Seattle Bid Opportunities • Public works projects are advertised in the Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce and online at the eBid eXchange website: https://www.ebidexchange.com/seattle/. • A complete list is on the City Purchasing and Contracting Services (CPCS) website at www.seattle.gov/city-purchasing-and-contracting/construction-contracting. • For Purchasing and Goods and Services opportunities visit the Buy Line Blog http://thebuyline.seattle.gov/category/bids-and-proposals/ • For Consultant Contracts visit http://consultants.seattle.gov/category/announcements/ City of Seattle WMBE News – February 2019 City Purchasing and Contracting Services Director: Liz Alzeer, Liz.Alzeer@seattle.gov
  10. 10. Upcoming Events Introduction to Working with the City of Seattle Workshops (in Spanish) Friday March 15, 2019 from 10 am - 12 pm Seattle Municipal Tower - 700 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4080. Seattle, WA 98108 This program will be presented in Spanish. Learn about how to do business with the City of Seattle. Learn about City bid processes for your product/service, get information about the Consultant Roster program and application process, learn about the City’s Public Works contracting process, hear about the City’s WMBE resources, and more. There will be assistance – step by step – to register onto the City of Seattle’s Online Business Directory. For more information, please contact Carmen Kucinski at Carmen.Kucinski@seattle.gov 2019 City of Seattle Upcoming Consultant Projects Forum Thursday March 21, 2019 from 8:00 am to 12 pm Seattle City Hall - Bertha Knight Landes Room. 600 4th Ave, Seattle, WA 98104 We would like to invite you and your consultant community network to join us for the 2019 City of Seattle Upcoming Consultant Business Opportunities Forum. This event will provide the consultant community with information about upcoming opportunities to do business with the City of Seattle. There will be department representatives from, Seattle Public Utilities (SPU), Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Seattle City Light (SCL), and Seattle Department of Finance and Administration (FAS). Contract Managers will present information on several designs, engineering services, and support services projects. Contract Managers and other staff will be available to speak one-to-one with consultants and consultants will also have time to network with each other. Registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/city-of-seattle-upcoming-consultant-business-opportunities-forum-registration- 54983544261 Public Works Contracting Ship Canal Water Quality Project - Storage Tunnel Package Formal advertisement is expected in early March 2019. The Storage Tunnel Package is part of the Ship Canal Water Quality Project (SCWQP). The SCWQP will reduce combined sewer overflows in to the Lake Washington Ship Canal. It is a shared project between SPU and King County (KC) that will construct an offline, deep storage tunnel between the Ballard and Wallingford on the north side of the Ship Canal. For more information, please contact the SPU Project Manager, Stephanie Secord at Stephanie.Secord@seattle.gov or (206) 386-9778. or refer to the program website at http://www.seattle.gov/Util/EnvironmentConservation/Projects/ShipCanalWaterQuality/index.htm The package is estimated at ~$219M and includes: • Excavation and support for five shafts • Excavation and support for 13,939 feet of 18-foot 10-inch Inside Diameter segmentally lined tunnel • Excavation and support for 646 feet of 94-inch Inside Diameter microtunnel • Excavation and support for two 8 foot Inside Diameter conventionally mined adits • Disposal of excavated materials • Installation of surface conveyance pipe at 3 of the shaft locations • Installation of structures and concrete work at 4 of the shaft locations • Installation of Mechanical, HVAC, Electrical, I&C components and Piping at 4 of the shaft locations • Tieback removal • Site Restoration and street improvements The main construction site is near 24th and Shilshole Avenues NW in Seattle, WA’s Ballard neighborhood. There are 4 additional sites; near 11th Ave. NW and NW 45th St. in Ballard, near Leary Way NW and NW 2nd Ave. in Fremont, near N 35th St. and Interlake Ave. N in Wallingford, and near 3rd Ave. W and W Ewing St. in North Queen Anne neighborhood. This package is a Covered Project subject to the City of Seattle’s Community Workforce Agreement (CWA) and Priority Hire SMC 20.37.
  11. 11. The City is committed to socially-responsible procurement and promoting social equity through our contracts. We work to ensure open and fair procurements, competitive and fair pricing, environmentally-sustainable solutions, best labor practices, access to equal benefits and utilization of WMBE firms, when applicable, in City bid decisions and contracts. Your City WMBE Team Director Liz Alzeer 206-684-4535 WMBE Compliance Miguel Beltran 206-684-4525 WMBE Assistance Carmen Kucinski 206-684-0188 City Purchasing Pam Tokunaga 206-233-7114 Mayor’s Policy Advisor for Economic Inclusion and Contracting Equity Edson Zavala 206-684-5584 Department WMBE Contacts Office of Arts and Culture Sheila Moss 206-233-7016 Office of City Auditor Melissa Alderson 206-386-4168 Seattle Civil Service Commission Jennifer Greenlee 206-233-7118 Seattle Community Police Commission Fe’ Lopez 206-684-5175 Dept. of Education and Early Learning Donnie Grabowski 206-233-2603 Dept. of Information Technology Jeremy Doane 206-684-5962 Dept. of Neighborhoods Grace Dygico 206-684-0466 Dept. of Planning and Development Samuel Assefa 206-386-1183 Dept. of Construction and Inspections Denise Campbell 206-386-4035 Finance and Administrative Services Javier Valdez 206-684-5584 Seattle Employees Retirement System Deontrae Sherrard 206-615-1431 Department of Human Resources Solomon Alemayehu 206-733-9175 Human Services Department Terry Hayes 206-684-0275 Law Department Dana Anderson 206-684-7761 Legislative Department Eric Ishino 206-684-8141 Seattle Public Library Jay Donahue 206-684-7410 Dept. of Education and Early Learning Donnie Graboski 206-233-2603 Municipal Court John Kerr 206-684-8274 Office of Economic Development Amanda Allen 206-684-8894 Office of Hearing Examiner Patricia Cole 206-615-1570 Office of Intergovernmental Relations Jasmin Weaver 206-684-8208 Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs Katherine Cortes 206-733-9116 Office of Sustainability and Environment Jeanie Boawn 206-615-0817 Seattle Parks and Recreation Sue Goodwin 206-615-0374 Seattle Police Department Valarie Anderson 206-733-9315 Seattle Police Pension Fund Dan Oliver 206-386-1289 Seattle City Light Kara Williams 206-684-3641 Seattle Department of Transportation Viviana Garza 206-684-5188 Seattle Center Ned Dunn 206-684-7212 Seattle Fire Department Julie McCarty 206-386-1259 Seattle Firefighters Pension Board Steven Brown 206-625-4355 Seattle Ethics and Elections CommissionWayne Barnett 206-684-8577 Seattle Office for Civil Rights Brenda Anibarro 206-684-4514 Seattle Public Utilities Katia Garcia 206-733-9155 WMBE Program The City actively supports utilization of WMBE on City contracts as both primes and subcontractors, and each City department establishes plans and annual voluntary goals for WMBE inclusion in consulting and purchasing contracts. The City recognizes WMBE firms that self-identify with at least 51 percent minority or women ownership. To learn more about the City’s WMBE programs, contact the Contract Compliance Manager, Miguel Beltran at 206-684-4525 Priority Hire City construction projects of $5 million or more operate under a community workforce agreement (CWA) and are required to have a percentage of project hours performed by workers living in economically distressed areas and to achieve goals for hiring women and people of color. For more information contact the Labor Equity Manager, Anna Pavlik at 206-615-1112 Acceptable Work Site The City requires that our construction work sites are respectful, appropriate, and free from bullying, hazing and other similar behaviors. CPCS monitors work site, provides trainings and materials, responds to complaints, and enforces as needed. For more information, contact Michael DeGive at 206-386-4128 First Friday drop-in training How to do Business with the City At these “101” sessions, the City provide information to vendors, consultants and contractors on how to do business with the City including tips on bidding, explanations of procedures and forms and an opportunity to meet the buyer for your commodity or specialty. When: First Friday of the month. Time: 9 to 11 am Where: Seattle Municipal Tower, 700 fifth Ave. Suite 4080, Seattle No RSVP is needed. Social Responsibility in City of Seattle Contracting

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