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Tabor 100 January 2019 Newsletter

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Photos Courtesy of Keith Williams, Flyright Productions
Graphic Design and Editing by Kalea Perry

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Tabor 100 January 2019 Newsletter

  1. 1. 1 January 2019 As we begin 2019 I ask Tabor 100 members to reach out to the Legislature to request that they support Initiative 1000. I-1000 will go a long way to right the wrongs of the sorely misguided I-200 which was voted into law in 1998. Estimates show that it has deprived minority and women-owned businesses of almost $4 billion in opportunities. I also ask members of the Legislature to adopt I-1000 instead of sending it to the ballot box or offering an alternative. In this Legislative session, the most direct and expedient way to aid women and minority communities regarding education, employment and contracting is for you to vote “yes” for I-1000. The initiative turned in more than 380,000 signatures and needs about 260,000 certified voters out of that number in order for it to go to the Legislature. We urge the Legislature to vote the initiative into law as soon as the signatures are certified. The case for the Legislature quickly turning I-1000 into law is compelling: 1) It has garnered more signatures than any ballot measure to the Legislature ever; 2) It enjoys the full and unequivocal support of the three living former Governor’s and the current occupant of the office – Governor Jay Inslee; 3) Washington is only one of 8 states in the nation that has banned affirmative action and I-1000 will turn that around; and 4) I-200 has stunted the growth of our businesses, education and employment opportunities for more than 20 years. Tabor 100 will be fully engaged in advocating for I-1000. We will be reaching out to all of you often to join in this fight. I cannot talk about I-1000 without recognizing former State Representative Jesse Wineberry and Gubernatorial Advisor and successful businessman, Nat Jackson. They have worked tirelessly for more than a year to see I-1000 be made law. They represent selfless devotion to a just cause. We applaud them and, more importantly, will make sure what they have promoted over the last year becomes law and makes for untold opportunities in minority communities statewide. Message from the President Tabor 100 is an association of entrepreneurs and business advocates who are committed to economic power, educational excellence and social equity for African-Americans and the community at large. 3 Brian Bonlender Page 2 EEC Update Page 3 Mian Rice Page 4 Honoring Mrs. Jones Page 5 - 6 Get the newsletter online and stay connected through social media! Vision Becomes Reality
  2. 2. 2 Winds of Change By Brian Bonlender Some of you may know by now that I have resigned my position as director with Washington State’s Department of Commerce, and I’ll no longer be with the agency after mid-January. After six years working intensely with the diverse programs and great staff at Commerce, I look forward to spending more time in Seattle with my family and exploring what is next. As I’ve reflected on my tenure, I’d like to share a few highlights with you. Under my leadership, I’m proud that Commerce reimagined and reinvigorated Washington’s economy. While challenges remain, our state is now leading the way in the fight against homelessness. During my time here, Commerce created new programs around mental health and early learning and shored up programs that support local government infrastructure. Importantly, I helped set a vision for years to come by centering our agency staff around the shared mission of strengthening communities. Commerce has begun exploring how to more equitably direct its pass-through funds throughout the state. Because of its key role to strengthen communities, the department each year invests hundreds of millions of dollars into Washington by funding community infrastructure, affordable housing, clean energy, water infrastructure, and myriad other essential services and programs. Community organizations, cities, counties, tribes and many other entities carry out the projects and programs; in turn hiring thousands of contractors each year. As an initial step, Commerce is having its contractors report the dollars that go to certified minority, women and veteran subcontractors. This baseline information will inform the agency’s future work in helping to increase opportunities for these diverse businesses, as they create and maintain needed jobs throughout our communities. In addition, Commerce is committed to improving access to funding and to services for communities and people who have the greatest needs. As far as we know, Commerce is the first state agency to do this. I am both proud and excited to have launched this work, and I look forward to seeing the next steps as a Washingtonian who is personally dedicated to diversity, equity and inclusion. Brian has been an active “behind the scenes” supporter of Tabor 100, including providing some of the first funds to help open the Economic Empowerment Center. We wish him the best in his new venture. Tabor 100
  3. 3. Equity Empowerment Center Status – January 2019 We are very pleased with the progress in the development of our Tabor Equity Empowerment Center. We are on track for opening by mid-year 2019. We continue our lease negotiations for the Intergate building in Tukwila. The discussions are going very well and we see no impediments towards reaching a signed agreement in a timely way. We are now discussing and designing the tenant improvements that will create the space to be the warm and inviting facility we intend. The lease cost is within our intended budget and annual operating cost expectations, while providing all the space and features we hoped for. It will include 40 parking spaces, a number of private offices, and large training, conference and general meeting spaces. We know this will become a community gathering place for larger events as well as a business-based center to enhance business capacity. We are also well on track for our funding. We appreciate the help from Council President Bruce Harrell, Sound Transit, King County, the Port of Seattle, the Washington State Department of Commerce, and the Washington State Department of Transportation. We have all the funding secured for start-up costs as well as most of our 2019 operational funding. We are grateful to those who have helped make this possible. During the coming months, we will be preparing specific information for those who are interested in a membership to the EEC, whether you seek a private office, a personal desk, or just occasional use. We look forward to offering tours of the facility as it begins construction improvements in the spring. Nancy Locke
  4. 4. 4 The Port of Seattle has promoted Mian Rice to the position of Director of Diversity in Contracting. He was in the acting-director role from his prior position as Small Business Program and Policy Manager. The promotion is effective immediately. "Mian Rice brings over 23 years of public and private sector experience to this position, having managed complex projects in limited time-frames while delivering results,” said Dave McFadden, Director, Economic Development Division. Rice’s work history includes time at CH2M Hill, where he supervised public projects overseas, King County, and Seattle; the City of Seattle— where he served in several roles during the Nickels administration—as a Transportation Policy Advisor, the Office of Intergovernmental Relations, and the Department of Executive Administration; Turner Construction; and a prior stint at the Port of Seattle as an aviation planner at Sea-Tac International Airport. “I look forward to improving opportunities for small and WMBE businesses, to promote diversity in Port contracts, and to provide economic equity across the region,” said Mian Rice. “For me, this is the role my work experience has led me to, and it will be an honor to help others succeed.” The position supervises the Port's new diversity and contracting initiative that aims to increase to 15 percent the amount of spend on WMBE contracts and triple the utilization of women and minority business suppliers over the next five years. The position will also define and drive broader small and WMBE business development initiatives that create middle-class jobs and support Seattle’s working waterfront and Sea-Tac International Airport. Mian Rice Port of Seattle Director of Diversity in Contracting https://www.portseattle.org/news/mian-rice-promoted-new-director-diversity-contracting
  5. 5. 5 Continued on page 6 ‘While I’m gone, make good decisions’: Jeannette Jones, a Seattle educator for nearly 50 years, dies at 72 By: Dahlia Bazzaz Seattle Times staff reporter [originally published: 1/8/19] Let us honor Mrs. Jones, and her challenge – and make good decisions around our kids and education… Jeannette Jones weighed barely over 100 pounds, but she was hard to miss. At Washington Middle School, where she worked as an administrator and disciplinarian for three decades, you could often find her atop a chair, bullhorn in hand, telling students to pull up their pants or counting the seconds until the bell rang. When she died last month at 72, hundreds took to social media and shared their stories of Mrs. Jones, a proud graduate of Garfield High School, a lover of the color purple and a dedicated educator of Seattle’s Central District preteens. The cause was cancer, her family said. Many students at Washington Middle got to know her in detention, where she had a reputation for being firm yet compassionate. By the time she wrapped up her 47-year career at Seattle Public Schools in 2016, more than a dozen of her former students had become her godchildren. “There are very few people who live their calling,” said Matthew Jones, her husband of 49 years. “And she definitely did.” As a child, she demonstrated her knack for leading young people, her family said: In elementary school, she’d assign homework and create lesson plans for the kids in her Central District neighborhood. She started working for the district in 1969 after graduating from Central Washington University, where she was the college’s first black homecoming queen and a regular participant in civil-rights demonstrations, said her daughter Ain Powell. As an educator in what was once a predominantly black neighborhood, Mrs. Jones was conscious of how experiences in school could follow youth of color for the rest of their lives. Her approach to discipline was patience and consistency, and she was careful to never use suspension or expulsion as a knee-jerk response. She was also loving: She gave students rides home from parties, and got to know their families. Jeannette Jones at her Washington Middle School office on Valentine’s Day in 2016, the year she retired. She could often be found wearing purple, her favorite color. (Photo courtesy of Jones’ family
  6. 6. 6 ‘While I’m gone, make good decisions’: Jeannette Jones, a Seattle educator for nearly 50 years, dies at 72 “Most teachers and administrators would have easily expelled me from school,” said former Washington Middle student Ahuacan DeGruy. Instead, he said, he spent an “enormous” amount of time in Mrs. Jones’ office. DeGruy, now 41, was academically astute but had a temper, he said. While another teacher told DeGruy he wouldn’t graduate from high school, Mrs. Jones saw past the anger, even when it was directed toward her. She assured his mother that he’d be OK, never wavering in her belief that he would succeed. It wasn’t until later that he realized the educator’s impact. DeGruy kept in touch with Mrs. Jones, returning to update her on his life milestones — graduating with honors from Morehouse College, earning an MBA from Duke University. She attended his mother’s memorial service, and DeGruy considers her two daughters as sisters. “Mrs. Jones recognized the hardships as a young black man that I would face in my life,” said DeGruy. “She loved her students through thick and thin, and wasn’t obligated to.” Mrs. Jones’ enthusiasm for her job made everyone a better teacher, said Bob Knatt, former band director at Washington Middle. Over the years, photos of DeGruy and other students covered the walls of her office at Washington Middle so tightly that in some places the original paint was no longer visible. Matthew Jones, her husband, said they seldom traveled anywhere — including places as far away as New Zealand — without hearing a former student yell, “Mrs. Jones!” Once in a while, former students who were incarcerated would call Mrs. Jones from prison. Seeing Mrs. Jones’ community impact inspired her nephew Calvin Watts to follow in her footsteps. He’s now the superintendent of Kent School District. When she wasn’t spending hours after school with students or organizing community events, Mrs. Jones was a cheerleading coach and volunteered at Mount Zion Baptist Church in Seattle, where she led the Christian education program and served on the church security team. She also helped her oldest daughter, Dayo Edwards, with her catering business. “She prided herself on being consistently Mrs. Jones in all of her glory — at church, at the grocery store, everywhere,” said Edwards. After Mrs. Jones retired from Seattle Public Schools in 2016, Edwards helped her mother clean out her office at Washington Middle. She snapped a picture of the message Mrs. Jones had written on the whiteboard just outside her door. It said, “While I’m gone, make good decisions.” Mrs. Jones is survived by her two daughters, Ain Powell and Dayo Edwards, her husband, Matthew, three siblings — Francis Gladney and Frank and Roy Graham — three grandchildren and 15 godchildren. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 12, at Mount Zion Baptist Church. Flowers may be sent to Columbia Funeral Home. Continued from page 5
  7. 7. 7 December 2018 General Meeting
  8. 8. 8 THE TABOR 100 BOARD President: Ollie Garrett President@Tabor100.org Vice President: Brian Sims VP@Tabor100.org Treasurer: Aundrea Jackson Treasurer@Tabor100.org Secretary: Sherlita Kennedy Secretary@Tabor100.org Membership: Vacant Membership@Tabor100.org Education: Kevin C. Washington Education@Tabor100.org Public Affairs: Henry Yates PublicAffairs@Tabor100.org Economic Development: Manal al-Ansi EconomicDevelopment@Tabor100.org Government Affairs: David Hackney GovernmentAffairs@Tabor100.org Fund Development: Abdul Yusuf FundDevelopment@Tabor100.org Business Development: Anthony Burnett BusinessDev@Tabor100.org TABOR OFFICE 2330 130th Ave. NE #101 Bellevue, WA 98005 425-882-4800 x 107 Staff@Tabor100.org Newsletter Graphic Design and Editor: Kalea Perry, KaleaPerry@Hotmail.com WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO REACH OUT! UPCOMING EVENTS Jan. 26: Tabor 100 General Meeting, 10am-12pm, Central Area Senior Center Jan. 31: Downtown Redmond Link Extension Outreach Event Small and Disadvantaged Business (DBEs), 4pm-7pm, Tukwila Community Center Feb. 3: Dark Divas, 1pm & 7pm, Langston Hughes Cultural Arts Center Feb. 5: Sound Transit Drop In, 11am-12pm, Sound Transit Headquarters Feb. 13: UW Supplier Orientation, 1pm-2:30pm, UW Roosevelt Commons West, 3rd Floor (Pre-Registration Required) COMMITTEE MEETINGS Jan. 26: Education Committee meets after the Tabor General Meeting, from 12-2pm at the Central Area Senior Center Combined Library and Computer Room
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  10. 10. The City is committed to socially-responsible procurement and promoting social equity through our contracts. We work to ensure open and fair procurements, competitive and fair pricing, environmentally-sustainable solutions, best labor practices, access to equal benefits and utilization of WMBE firms, when applicable, in City bid decisions and contracts. Your City WMBE Team Director Liz Alzeer 206-684-4535 WMBE Compliance Miguel Beltran 206-684-4525 WMBE Assistance Carmen Kucinski 206-684-0188 City Purchasing Pam Tokunaga 206-233-7114 Mayor’s Policy Advisor for Economic Inclusion and Contracting Equity Edson Zavala 206-684-5584 Department WMBE Contacts Office of Arts and Culture Sheila Moss 206-233-7016 Office of City Auditor Melissa Alderson 206-386-4168 Seattle Civil Service Commission Jennifer Greenlee 206-233-7118 Seattle Community Police Commission Fe’ Lopez 206-684-5175 Dept. of Education and Early Learning Donnie Grabowski 206-233-2603 Dept. of Information Technology Jeremy Doane 206-684-5962 Dept. of Neighborhoods Grace Dygico 206-684-0466 Dept. of Planning and Development Samuel Assefa 206-386-1183 Dept. of Construction and Inspections Denise Campbell 206-386-4035 Finance and Administrative Services Javier Valdez 206-684-5584 Seattle Employees Retirement System Deontrae Sherrard 206-615-1431 Department of Human Resources Solomon Alemayehu 206-733-9175 Human Services Department Terry Hayes 206-684-0275 Law Department Dana Anderson 206-684-7761 Legislative Department Eric Ishino 206-684-8141 Seattle Public Library Jay Donahue 206-684-7410 Dept. of Education and Early Learning Donnie Graboski 206-233-2603 Municipal Court John Kerr 206-684-8274 Office of Economic Development Amanda Allen 206-684-8894 Office of Hearing Examiner Patricia Cole 206-615-1570 Office of Intergovernmental Relations Jasmin Weaver 206-684-8208 Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs Katherine Cortes 206-733-9116 Office of Sustainability and Environment Jeanie Boawn 206-615-0817 Seattle Parks and Recreation Sue Goodwin 206-615-0374 Seattle Police Department Valarie Anderson 206-733-9315 Seattle Police Pension Fund Dan Oliver 206-386-1289 Seattle City Light Kara Williams 206-684-3641 Seattle Department of Transportation Viviana Garza 206-684-5188 Seattle Center Ned Dunn 206-684-7212 Seattle Fire Department Julie McCarty 206-386-1259 Seattle Firefighters Pension Board Steven Brown 206-625-4355 Seattle Ethics and Elections CommissionWayne Barnett 206-684-8577 Seattle Office for Civil Rights Brenda Anibarro 206-684-4514 Seattle Public Utilities Katia Garcia 206-733-9155 WMBE Program The City actively supports utilization of WMBE on City contracts as both primes and subcontractors, and each City department establishes plans and annual voluntary goals for WMBE inclusion in consulting and purchasing contracts. The City recognizes WMBE firms that self- identify with at least 51 percent minority or women ownership. To learn more about the City’s WMBE programs, contact the Contract Compliance Manager, Miguel Beltran at 206-684-4525 Priority Hire City construction projects of $5 million or more operate under a community workforce agreement (CWA) and are required to have a percentage of project hours performed by workers living in economically distressed areas and to achieve goals for hiring women and people of color. For more information contact the Labor Equity Manager, Anna Pavlik at 206-615-1112 Acceptable Work Site The City requires that our construction work sites are respectful, appropriate, and free from bullying, hazing and other similar behaviors. CPCS monitors work site, provides trainings and materials, responds to complaints, and enforces as needed. For more information, contact Michael DeGive at 206-386-4128 WMBE Technical Assistance The City of Seattle provides FREE technical assistance to businesses seeking to bid on government contracts. The Technical Assistance office is managed independently by the Washington Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) on the 41st floor of the Seattle Municipal Tower. For more information, contact Kylene Petersn at 206.684-8594 seattle@washingtonPTAC.org Social Responsibility in City of Seattle Contracting

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