Embracing digital technologies to enhance student education in Higher Education

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Keynote presentation to York Higher eLearning Conference on using digital technologies to enhance student education

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  • Digital means are the future of education and slowly it will be going online where students can attend the class online through webinar if they are not feeling well. Various platforms have started focusing on creating online classrooms where they can record the class for students to view them later.
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Embracing digital technologies to enhance student education in Higher Education

  1. 1. Neil Morris Director of Digital Learning Professor of Educational Technology, Innovation and Change University of Leeds National Teaching Fellow Image © University of Leeds Email: n.p.morris@leeds.ac.uk Twitter: @neilmorrisleeds, @unileedsonline Embracing digital technologies to enhance student education in Higher Education
  2. 2. Disruption Blended learning Mobile learning Social learning Students as learning partners Session overview
  3. 3. Increased student expectations Highly competitive recruitment market Greater need to demonstrate distinctiveness Multi-channel content Lack of digital skills in staff and students Prevalence of multi-functional mobile devices Multi-faceted pressures on staff Focus on graduate employability Public metrics e.g. KIS The changing landscape of Higher Education
  4. 4. Mobile learning in action Deep learning Multimodal learning Any time, any place
  5. 5. N=1363 (Nov 2012; Middleton and Caperon, 2013) 50% use a mobile device frequently for research or assignments 23% use a mobile device frequently to read e-books 86% own a smartphone 97%own a laptop. 20% own a tablet device 35% are planning to purchase a tablet device for academic and social reasons 70% likely to use a mobile device to read articles or books online 87% use a mobile device frequently to use a search engine University of Leeds students’ use of mobile devices
  6. 6. Multi-channel content
  7. 7. Teacher as content provider Teacher as content advisor or curator Student learning Face to face teaching Other learning materials Other learning materials Restricted online material Publically available online material Learning materialsStudent sourced content Student produced content
  8. 8. University strategies for Digital Learning Digital strategy for Student Education Blended Learning Strategy Policy on Audio and Video Recordings for Educational Purposes MOOC vision and strategy Open Educational Resources policy
  9. 9. Blended learning strategy Face to face classes Learning resources Event capture Interaction collaboration Social media channels Mobile devices Online assessment Research
  10. 10. Digital learning channel portfolio Guidance on OERsPromoting online learning channels Only available to Registered Students Available to all learners Online Courses Individual Learning Objects Learning Objects complementing face-to-face provision (Blended Learning)
  11. 11. Enhancing face to face interactions
  12. 12. “Audio recordings of the lectures have been invaluable to me during my revision as they have allowed me to make full notes for revision purposes, as well as aiding my understanding of the more difficult material”
  13. 13. 76% have listened to more than half of the lecture audio recordings available to them On average, students listened to audio recordings of lectures TWICE, with over 80% listening to more than half of the recording 60% happy with the whole, unedited, lecture being posted. 30%would prefer silences etc to be removed 73% indicated that the availability of lecture audio recordings does not influence lecture attendance 93% indicated that lecture audio recordings had become important/very important to their study habits 83% of students indicated that they think all lectures should be provided as an audio recording 90% indicated that they concentrate more in lectures where audio recordings are provided, as they don’t have to make so many notes 94%used recordings to increase understanding and 84% used them to write detailed lecture notes Smith, K and Morris, NP (2014) Evaluation of biomedical science students use and perceptions of podcasting. Bioscience Education Electronic Journal. ISSN 1479-786 Full text available as: http://dx.doi.org/10.11120/beej.2014.00024
  14. 14. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Every lecture: Most lectures: Some lectures: Few lectures: No lectures: %ofrespondents 11.a. Watch on computer/laptop/mobile device 11.b. Watch on computer/laptop/mobile device and use to supplement lecture notes 11.c. Pause, rewind or watch multiple times David T: why does it stop potassium? maria: how does it block the channel? with a molecule or via a protein shipoopi: whats a hilock ? xxx: are ipsp's used to prevent unwanted ap's occurring spontaneously or just when an ap is occurring and needs to be stopped?
  15. 15. Particularly beneficial for non-native English language speakers. No detrimental effect on lecture attendance Bollmeier, S. G., Wenger P. J., Forinash A. B. (2011) Impact of Online Lecture-capture on Student Outcomes in a Therapeutics Course. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. 74: 127 Davis, S.J., Connolly, A., Linfield, E. (2009) Lecture capture: Making the most of face to face learning Engineering Education: Journal of the Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre 4: 4-13 Owston R.; Lupshenyuk D.; Wideman H. (2011) Lecture capture in large undergraduate classes: Student perceptions and academic performance. Internet and Higher Education. 14: 262-268 Shaw G.P.; Molnar D. (2011) Non-native english language speakers benefit most from the use of lecture capture in medical school. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education. 39: 416-420 Useful for high achieving students to skip through and find key points of interest. Beneficial for weaker students, who view recordings multiple times Synchronised with learning materials Useful for revision Popular with students and easy to use
  16. 16. REC Open desktop software and press record. Screen, audio and video captured. Automatic upload to system for review, edit and approve. Make available to colleague, VLE or public. REC Upload video to MyMediasite from mobile devices. Available for review, edit and approve. Make available to colleague, VLE or public. Capturing and creating content One simple interface Intuitive editing tools Seamless integration Review, Edit, Approve One simple interface VLE or ‘MyMediaSite’ Secure access control Review, edit and approve One simple interface for review, edit and approve. In VLE or via ‘MyMediaSite’. Remove video, add content, edit material. * If lecturer has not opted-out of recording. † If video camera available, and a video recording has been scheduled Learning Teaching Research REC Recording starts and stops automatically* . Button on the lectern can be used to pause / stop. Scheduled session in Central Teaching Space Screen, audio and video† captured. Automatic upload to system for review, edit and approve. At-desk recording Create and upload content from a mobile device
  17. 17. The flipped classroom At-desk recording REC Open desktop software and press record. Screen, audio and video captured. Automatic upload to system for review, edit and approve. Make available to colleague, VLE or public. Problem-solving Discussion Creativity Conceptual understanding Active learning
  18. 18. Embracing digital technologies to enhance student education in Higher Education http://www.sdduonline.leeds.ac.uk/changinglandscape/
  19. 19. Enhancing students engagement with learning © University of Leeds
  20. 20. eVoting handsets (student response systems) • Increase interactivity; • Increase knowledge retention; • Stimulate debate; • Increase engagement; • Offer feedback; • Increase participation in lectures, practicals and tutorials. Kaleta, Robert, and Joosten, Tanya. "Student Response Systems: A University of Wisconsin System Study of Clickers," Educause Center for Applied Research Research Bulletin. Vol. 2007, Issue 10, May 8, 2007, pp. 4–6 Beatty, Ian. "Transforming Student Learning with Classroom Communication Systems," Educause Center for Applied Research Research Bulletin. Volume 2004, Issue 3 (February 3, 2004), p. 5. Using classroom communication systems to support interaction and discussion in large class settings by James Boyle & David Nicol - http://www.ph.utexas.edu/~ctalk/bulletin/glasgow2.pdf
  21. 21. One professor in FBS teaching first-year biochemistry students said: “Simply, it was a great week. Students seem to love the clicker questions... The atmosphere in the lecture theatre was like none I have experienced before, with students talking to me and working with me, asking questions, and asking for help.”
  22. 22. Data from Pew Internet & American Life Project (2011 and 2012 data sets). See: http://pewinternet.org/ for full details. Image © Twitter 65% of American adult users make use of a social networking site like Facebook, LinkedIn or MySpace 61% of online Americans under 30 use a social networking site on a daily basis 32% of American internet users aged 50-64 use a social networking site on a daily basis (up from 20% in 2010) 15% of American internet users make use of Twitter, with 8% using it on a typical day, quadrupling since 2010.
  23. 23. H Engagement via Facebook 93% of respondents use Facebook 63% ‘Liked’ the module FB page 70% indicated that the FB content was useful for learning
  24. 24. H Use of Twitter • 29.5% of respondents followed BMSC2118 on Twitter • Over 57% of respondents don’t use Twitter
  25. 25. Investigating the impact of tablet devices on learning © University of Leeds #aberBL
  26. 26. “Revolutionary, this has changed the way I approach a class, I feel totally prepared as, I get the lecture slides without having to print them, take notes , record, reference and if necessary look things up, all in the palm of my hand... WOW” © University of Leeds © University of Leeds
  27. 27. “I really enjoyed the neuroanatomy practical class as I felt the use of iPads cleverly appealed to the students whilst allowing us to revise in a new and effective way” “Made finding information really easy - when you have a question and can't find the answer using the iPad you can find it yourself instead or leaving without knowing” Neil Morris, University of Leeds; CC-BY-NC-SA Neil Morris, University of Leeds; CC-BY-NC-SA
  28. 28. © Morris et al, in preparation (data collected in three academic sessions) 76% said that using tablet devices in a practical class was beneficial to their learning Over70%used allof the apps provided on the tablet device during the practical class 3D Brain HD Brain Slyvius Google Soundnote % students used 98.2 71.9 26.3 75.4 9.6 Average time used (minutes ±SD) 16.2±9.5 9.5±7 10.2±8 14±9 6.8±4 % Agreed useful 98.0 75.0 68.1 94.6 63.0
  29. 29. Cutaneous testing Immunofluorescence Electrophysiology
  30. 30. Morris, N.P. & Lambe, J. (2014) Submitted
  31. 31. Students perceptions of changes in study habits Access to learning resources: “Well I’ve got the access to internet in lectures. I think the main thing I’ve used it for is cos it’s portable and easy to carry around and stuff, so I’ve always got access to you know the internet and VLE wherever I am, I don’t have to get a computer. Accessibility is probably the main thing it’s changed.” Organisation and time management: “I feel more organised, like before I was always the person asking other people when assignments were due, but it took two minutes to set up and I’ve found it really useful” Ownership: “I think I could get used to it but being aware that I’d have to get it back, I don’t want to get too used to it. It would be good if you were to actually get one for real. Then I’d probably use it more.”
  32. 32. Images © University of Leeds;
  33. 33. Embracing openness © CC
  34. 34. Cormier, D. (2010) What is a MOOC? YouTube. CC-BY 2010 Accessed at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW3g
  35. 35. Staff perspectives on blended learning and MOOCs. N=267 responses, Summer 2013, © University of Leeds) 82% agreed that MOOCs offer opportunities for flexible learning 69% agreed that MOOCs increase access to Higher Education 140 academics would like to develop a MOOC in next 1-2 years 64% agreed that developing a MOOC would enhance their digital literacy skills 57% agreed that face-to- face learning in combination with MOOCs was an effective learning model 70% agreed they would recommend MOOCs to their students
  36. 36. MOOC pedagogy Social constructivist Participatory Active learning Research- based Teacher- and participant- focused Digital literacy support Multi-format content Accessible content Social
  37. 37. FREE ONLINE COURSE Sign up at futurelearn.com https://futurelearn.com/courses/when-worlds-collide Sign up to ‘Exploring anatomy: the human abdomen’ http://futurelearn.com Coursestartson 10 February2014 For 3 weeks, 4 hoursper week Explore the inner workings of the human abdomen with experienced anatomy lecturer Dr James Pickering http://twitter.com/accessanatomy #FLanatomy Learn about the structure and function of vital organs, and through discussion relate this to common surgical scenarios and current research. Interested in the anatomy of the human body?This course is for you. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/anatomy SEC3 2014 Engaging Leeds Guidance on OERs MOOC portfolio Delivered: For delivery in 2014:
  38. 38. second is is Images © University of Leeds
  39. 39. second is is Students are encouraged to participate in discussion forums to interact with the course content and their fellow students. Interactive Discussion Forums Images © University of Leeds
  40. 40. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 %QUIZSCORE NUMBER OF VIDEOS WWC1 WWC2
  41. 41. FREE ONLINE COURSE Sign up at futurelearn.com https://futurelearn.com/courses/when-worlds-collide Sign up to ‘Exploring anatomy: the human abdomen’ http://futurelearn.com Coursestartson 10 February2014 For 3 weeks, 4 hoursper week Explore the inner workings of the human abdomen with experienced anatomy lecturer Dr James Pickering http://twitter.com/accessanatomy #FLanatomy Learn about the structure and function of vital organs, and through discussion relate this to common surgical scenarios and current research. Interested in the anatomy of the human body?This course is for you. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/anatomy
  42. 42. FREE ONLINE COURSE Sign up at futurelearn.com https://futurelearn.com/courses/when-worlds-collide Sign up to ‘Exploring anatomy: the human abdomen’ http://futurelearn.com Coursestartson 10 February2014 For 3 weeks, 4 hoursper week Explore the inner workings of the human abdomen with experienced anatomy lecturer Dr James Pickering http://twitter.com/accessanatomy #FLanatomy Learn about the structure and function of vital organs, and through discussion relate this to common surgical scenarios and current research. Interested in the anatomy of the human body?This course is for you. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/anatomy
  43. 43. iTunesU Guidance on OERsiTunes U
  44. 44. The future of digital learning Online accreditation Hybrid courses Online exams Game- based learning Personalised learning Integrated tablets Learning analytics
  45. 45. References and acknowledgements Morris, N.P. (2007) HEA Centre for Bioscience E-learning Case Study. Blended learning resources for a first year neuroscience/pharmacology module – an e-learning practice case study: ftp://www.bioscience.heacademy.ac.uk/Resources/morris.pdf Morris, N.P. (2008) VLE implementation project. Learning and Teaching Bulletin, University of Leeds, Issue 18. Morris, N.P. (2010) Podcasts and mobile assessment enhance student learning experience and academic performance. Bioscience Education. 16:1. Morris, N.P. (2010) Using eVoting handsets in Biological Sciences. Learning and Teaching Bulletin, University of Leeds. Issue 24. Morris, N.P. (2010) Blended learning approaches enhance student academic performance. Enhancing Learning Experiences in Higher Education, Hong Kong University. Conference Proceedings: http://www.cetl.hku.hk/conference2010/pdf/Morris.pdf Morris, N. P. (2011) Using Blackboard for Blended Learning Enhances Student Engagement and Learning. Blackboard World Conference, Las Vegas, July 2011. http://blackboard.echo360.com/ess/echo/presentation/1a246e1f-faba-4bc6-8fe1-8e4234a4c790 Morris N.P., Ramsay, L., Chauhan, V. (2012) Can a tablet device enhance undergraduate science students study behaviours? Advances in Physiology Education 36: 97-107 Cottrell S; Morris N.P. (2012) Study Skills Connected. Palgrave MacMillan. Morris NP (2014) First time MOOC provider: reflections from a research-intensive university in the UK. European MOOC summit : 259- 263. Smith, K. & Morris, N.P. (2014) Evaluation of Biomedical Science students use and perceptions of Podcasting. Bioscience Education. 24. Acknowledgements to all final year project students, student interns, project officers and the Digital Learning Team who contributed to the work presented. Work funded by Higher Education Academy and University of Leeds All data © Neil Morris, University of Leeds Future online learning strategy
  46. 46. Stella Cottrell and Neil Morris Study Skills Connected 9781137019455 £12.99 27 Jul 2012 Future online learning strategy

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