Robert Gordon
University
9 May 2014
Rhona Sharpe
@rjsharpe
DEVELOPING DIGITAL LITERACY:
5 P’S FOR ONLINE LEARNERS
We live in a world that is
open
networked
Where technology is
ubiquitous
familiar
Where learning
environments are…
social
personal
mobile
with cats
How are learners operating
in this open, networked,
digital world?
Participatory
Iterative
A shared, collective inquiry
A tool for positive change
Changes our relations with
students
Learne...
TRUE OR FALSE?
Q1. Learners of the same generation
share similar approaches, attitudes and
skills with regards to technolo...
TRUE OR FALSE?
Q3. Learners think they are digitally
literate
Q4. Learners are digitally literate
Q5. Incoming students ex...
TRUE OR FALSE?
Q1. Learners of the same generation
share similar approaches, attitudes and
skills with regards to technolo...
Q1: The Digital Native Myth
Rosen (2012).
TRUE OR FALSE?
Q1. Learners of the same generation
share similar approaches, attitudes and
skills with regards to technolo...
Q2: Tech savvy students
“I just click here and oops that isn’t
what I wanted, so I do a lot of that
and I find it quite he...
Q2: New literacy practices
Gourlay, L. & Oliver, M. (2014)
TRUE OR FALSE?
Q3. Learners think they are digitally
literate
Q4. Learners are digitally literate
Q5. Incoming students ex...
Q3: Confident technology users
81% believe they are digitally literate
88% love digital technology.
1.6% use their smartph...
TRUE OR FALSE?
Q3. Learners think they are digitally
literate
Q4. Learners are digitally literate
Q5. Incoming students ex...
The functional access, skills
and practices necessary to
become a confident, agile
adopter of a range of
technologies for ...
‘Literacy’ implies
socially and
culturally situated
practices, often
highly dependent on
the context in which
they are car...
TRUE OR FALSE?
Q3. Learners think they are digitally
literate
Q4. Learners are digitally literate
Q5. Incoming students ex...
Incoming students expect
 Teaching staff have a good grasp of how to use established
digital technology and incorporate t...
OVERVIEW
Incoming students have high expectations
1. of institutions to provide robust and accessible
technology
2. of tea...
What activities help develop
effective practices for online learning?
prioritise
personalise
participatepresent
progress
1. PRIORITISE
I got behind and it was too hard to catch up
What unsuccessful online
students want us to know
19.7% I got behind and it was too hard to catch up
14.2% I had personal ...
1. PRIORITISE: IDEAS TO TRY
Learner readiness quiz
Shared calendar
Twitter chat
Watching events
Virtual office hours
#phdc...
5/8/2014 Online Learning Readiness Student Self-Assessment
Online Learning Readiness Questionnaire
Before enrolling in an ...
2. PERSONALISE
“No, of course I do not have my computer
on when I am trying to learn because
sometimes it distracts me bec...
2. PERSONALISE: IDEAS TO TRY
Improve onscreen
reading. Readability.com
Genius hour for content
curation e.g. Pinterest,
Le...
3. PARTICIPATE
“Log into Facebook and Skype to see what
others are doing – we have a quiz for one of
the units that we dec...
3. PARTICIPATE: IDEAS TO TRY
Window shots
Course glossary
Annotated bibliography
Blogging rubric
Edit Wikipedia entries
Cr...
REFERENCE ME
4. PRESENT: IDEAS TO TRY
Repositories
Infographics
Online posters
Virtual conference
Daily create Follow
@ds106dc
H818: THE NETWORKED PRACTITIONER
Open Studio, multimedia posters, virtual
conference, badges, Cloudworks . . . beyond
5. PROGRESS: IDEAS TO TRY
Charting toolkit
Badges
Learning analytics
Activities that help to develop
effective practices for online learning:
1. Are based on our understanding of how
learners...
SEND ME YOUR IDEAS
rsharpe@brookes.ac.uk
@rjsharpe
REFERENCES
Andrews, T., & Tynan, B. (2012). Distance learner : connected, mobile and
resourceful individuals. Australian J...
Developing Digital Literacy: 5 Ps for online learners
Developing Digital Literacy: 5 Ps for online learners
Developing Digital Literacy: 5 Ps for online learners
Developing Digital Literacy: 5 Ps for online learners
Developing Digital Literacy: 5 Ps for online learners
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Developing Digital Literacy: 5 Ps for online learners

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Keynote for Robert Gordon University Annual Teaching and Learning Conference, 9 May 2014.

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  • All based on learner experience research
  • Ultimately, learner experience research promotes changing relationships with students. Not objects of study but alongside us as part of the academic community
  • Write down your answers (legibly so your neighbour can see)
  • Check with your neighbour
  • Student experience is radically shifted by networked learning towards experiences that are individual and diverse. Now that learning is online and open, it’s even more important that we understand learners’ experiences.
  • Q2. Sometimes, but not in ways that are helpful They think the main learning environments are Google and Wikipedia. We know students need to be taught about acceptable use of copyrighted images and online privacy.
  • Unfortunately learner experience research shows very few examples of this kind of confident, playful approach to using technology in educational contexts.
  • And even fewer remarkable new literacy practices These stand out – not teacher directed, even going against what we might recommend (nuking books
  • Used a DL definition and questionnaire from a previous JISC project at Greenwich, adapted by Psychology PhD student563 responses from students (out of 18,000 in the uni)westminster.ac.uk/digital-edge
  • This notion of the agile adopter stems from work conducted by Jane Seale and others as part of the LEXDIS project who talked about the importance of ‘digital agility’ of disabled learners. They were characterised by Being extremely familiar with technologyUsing a wide range of strategiesHaving high levels of confidence in their own ability to use technology“Digital literacy expresses the sum of capabilities an individual needs to live, learn and work in a digital society” (JISC, Developing Digital Literacy Workshops, 2011)
  • If you are interested in the term ‘literacy’ I’d refer you to this book, and ch. 11 particularly.
  • Incoming students expect that teaching staff have a good grasp of how to use established digital technology and incorporate technology into their teaching in an appropriate manner.Ubiquitous free-at-the-point-of-use access will be provided to the all of the Web.There will be a VLE populated with comprehensive organisational information and course related materials.It will be possible to easily connect any number of personal devices to the network
  • .
  • 12 years of surveys to unsuccessful students at Monroe community college
  • 12 years of surveys to unsuccessful students at Monroe community college
  • Remember this is about supporting the development of SITUATED PRACTICES – the I DO part of the model. We are already quite good at providing access and skills. Less good at developing ALLOWING personalised, contextualised practices to develop.Synchronous events really helpe.g. webinars, virtual office hours
  • In November 2010, a group of UK based research students began to meet together on  Wednesday evenings for an hour using the medium of Twitter in order to share their experiences of the doctoral journey. News of the gatherings quickly spread, and the discussions began to encompass postgraduate researchers from around the globe together with a number of people who have completed their doctoral journeys and a number of academics who are involved in supporting postgraduate research.  The Twitter discussions have continued each Wednesday evening, from 19.30 - 20.30 GMT or BST, according to the time of year. One of the hallmarks of #phdchat is that the discussions take a different theme each week, the theme often being selected by participants through a poll. Anybody can suggest a theme for discussion by via the Suggestions for future discussions pageAlso, #wenurses 
  • Help students to microwave their booksEncourage reading anywhere, on anythingWe know practices developed and shared socially
  • Help students to microwave their booksEncourage reading anywhere, on anythingWe know practices developed and shared socially
  • Genius hour for content curation e.g. Pinterest, Lessonpaths, Live Binders
  • Andews study. 12 DL in Aus, phenomenological approach
  • Support connections, collaborations, exchange of resources between peopleStart in your small community e.g. photo out of your window, then embark on the wider online community, aim for a PLE by the end of the course, create thing together eg. Course glosaary, annotated bibliography, newslettersPartiipate in the university community e.g. Brookes Student Apps competition
  • Here’s a good example…Reference Me, developed by students in response to a need, shared informally.
  • Sharing and identity are big dealsStudents need to be comfortable to present themselvesStudents love to showcase their work
  • Module on MA in Open and Distance Education from the UK Open University, led by Chris Peglar
  • People who can set their own goals learn better in moocsVisual indicators of learninghttp://elesig.ning.com/profiles/blogs/dr-cath-ellis-university-of-huddersfield-assessment-analytics-sho
  • i.e. tackle the problems that we know learners have with online learning
  • Developing Digital Literacy: 5 Ps for online learners

    1. 1. Robert Gordon University 9 May 2014 Rhona Sharpe @rjsharpe DEVELOPING DIGITAL LITERACY: 5 P’S FOR ONLINE LEARNERS
    2. 2. We live in a world that is open networked
    3. 3. Where technology is ubiquitous familiar
    4. 4. Where learning environments are… social personal mobile with cats
    5. 5. How are learners operating in this open, networked, digital world?
    6. 6. Participatory Iterative A shared, collective inquiry A tool for positive change Changes our relations with students Learner experience research
    7. 7. TRUE OR FALSE? Q1. Learners of the same generation share similar approaches, attitudes and skills with regards to technology use Q2. Learners’ transfer their ways of using technology from social to educational contexts
    8. 8. TRUE OR FALSE? Q3. Learners think they are digitally literate Q4. Learners are digitally literate Q5. Incoming students expect teaching staff to have a good grasp of how to use established digital technology.
    9. 9. TRUE OR FALSE? Q1. Learners of the same generation share similar approaches, attitudes and skills with regards to technology use Q2. Learners’ transfer their ways of using technology from social to educational contexts
    10. 10. Q1: The Digital Native Myth Rosen (2012).
    11. 11. TRUE OR FALSE? Q1. Learners of the same generation share similar approaches, attitudes and skills with regards to technology use Q2. Learners’ transfer their ways of using technology from social to educational contexts
    12. 12. Q2: Tech savvy students “I just click here and oops that isn’t what I wanted, so I do a lot of that and I find it quite helpful. You learn something every time you go around and around the menus” Jeffrey et al. (2011, p.403)
    13. 13. Q2: New literacy practices Gourlay, L. & Oliver, M. (2014)
    14. 14. TRUE OR FALSE? Q3. Learners think they are digitally literate Q4. Learners are digitally literate Q5. Incoming students expect teaching staff to have a good grasp of how to use established digital technology.
    15. 15. Q3: Confident technology users 81% believe they are digitally literate 88% love digital technology. 1.6% use their smartphone for study In general, students believe they are more digitally literate than their peers and staff. Emma Woods, Westminster University, JISC Transformation project
    16. 16. TRUE OR FALSE? Q3. Learners think they are digitally literate Q4. Learners are digitally literate Q5. Incoming students expect teaching staff to have a good grasp of how to use established digital technology.
    17. 17. The functional access, skills and practices necessary to become a confident, agile adopter of a range of technologies for personal, academic and professional use Oxford Brookes University (2010) Strategy for Enhancing the Student Experience. Q4: Defining digital literacy dlf.brookesblogs.net
    18. 18. ‘Literacy’ implies socially and culturally situated practices, often highly dependent on the context in which they are carried out. Beetham & Oliver (2010)
    19. 19. TRUE OR FALSE? Q3. Learners think they are digitally literate Q4. Learners are digitally literate Q5. Incoming students expect teaching staff to have a good grasp of how to use established digital technology.
    20. 20. Incoming students expect  Teaching staff have a good grasp of how to use established digital technology and incorporate technology into their teaching in an appropriate manner. Ubiquitous free-at-the-point-of-use access will be provided to the all of the Web. A VLE populated with comprehensive organisational information and course related materials. It will be possible to easily connect any number of personal devices to the network White, Beetham & Wild (2013) http://digitalstudent.jiscinvolve.org Q5: High expectations of tutors
    21. 21. OVERVIEW Incoming students have high expectations 1. of institutions to provide robust and accessible technology 2. of teachers to incorporate technology into their teaching in an appropriate manner Incoming students 3. often do not have the access or skills to use technology to support their study 4. sometimes demonstrate highly personalised, contextualised practices we can learn from.
    22. 22. What activities help develop effective practices for online learning? prioritise personalise participatepresent progress
    23. 23. 1. PRIORITISE I got behind and it was too hard to catch up
    24. 24. What unsuccessful online students want us to know 19.7% I got behind and it was too hard to catch up 14.2% I had personal problems 13.7% I couldn't handle combined study plus work/family 7.3% I didn't like the online format 7.3% I didn't like the instructor's teaching style 6.8% I experienced too many technical difficulties Fetzner (2013)
    25. 25. 1. PRIORITISE: IDEAS TO TRY Learner readiness quiz Shared calendar Twitter chat Watching events Virtual office hours #phdchat #wenurses
    26. 26. 5/8/2014 Online Learning Readiness Student Self-Assessment Online Learning Readiness Questionnaire Before enrolling in an online course, you should first assess your readiness for st epping int o t he online learning environment . Your answers t o t he following quest ions will help you det ermine what you need t o do t o succeed at online learning. Post -survey feedback will also provide you wit h informat ion on what you can expect from an online course. Inst ruct ions: Choose t he most accurat e response t o each st at ement . Then click t he Am I Ready? but t on. QUESTIONS Agree Somewhat Agree Disagree 1.  I  am good  at  setting  goals  and  deadlines  for myself. 2.  I  have  a  really  good  reason  for taking  an  online  course. 3.  I  finish  the  projects  I start. 4.  I  do  not  quit  just  because  things  get  difficult. 5.  I  can  keep  myself  on  track  and  on  time.   6.  I  learn  fairly  easily. 7.  I  can  learn  from things  I hear, like  lectures,  audio  recordings, or podcasts. 8.  I  have  to  read  something  to  learn  it  best. 9.  I  have  developed  good  ways  to  solve  problems  I run  into. 10.  I learn  best  when  I figure  things  out  for myself. 11.  I like  to  learn  in  a  group, but  I can  learn  on  my  own  as  well.
    27. 27. 2. PERSONALISE “No, of course I do not have my computer on when I am trying to learn because sometimes it distracts me because I have the Messenger on or I will read the newspapers and I don’t like that if I am trying to learn”. (Winter et al, 2010, p.78)
    28. 28. 2. PERSONALISE: IDEAS TO TRY Improve onscreen reading. Readability.com Genius hour for content curation e.g. Pinterest, Lessonpaths, Live Binders Disconnecting e.g. Stayfocussed.com, Getpocket.com Getpocket.com
    29. 29. 3. PARTICIPATE “Log into Facebook and Skype to see what others are doing – we have a quiz for one of the units that we decide that we’ll try and do together this afternoon..” Andrews & Tynan (2012, p. 574)
    30. 30. 3. PARTICIPATE: IDEAS TO TRY Window shots Course glossary Annotated bibliography Blogging rubric Edit Wikipedia entries Crowdsource maps
    31. 31. REFERENCE ME
    32. 32. 4. PRESENT: IDEAS TO TRY Repositories Infographics Online posters Virtual conference Daily create Follow @ds106dc
    33. 33. H818: THE NETWORKED PRACTITIONER Open Studio, multimedia posters, virtual conference, badges, Cloudworks . . . beyond
    34. 34. 5. PROGRESS: IDEAS TO TRY Charting toolkit Badges Learning analytics
    35. 35. Activities that help to develop effective practices for online learning: 1. Are based on our understanding of how learners experience online learning 2. Encourage the development of personalised practices which meet each learners’ needs 3. Engage learners as active participants 4. Provide opportunities for learners to present themselves and their work 5. Give feedback and reward for progress
    36. 36. SEND ME YOUR IDEAS rsharpe@brookes.ac.uk @rjsharpe
    37. 37. REFERENCES Andrews, T., & Tynan, B. (2012). Distance learner : connected, mobile and resourceful individuals. Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 28(4), 565-579. Beetham, H. & Oliver, M. (2010) The changing practices of knowledge and learning, in R. Sharpe, H. Beetham & S. de Freitas, Rethinking Learning for a Digital Age, Routledge. London & New York. Benfield, G. (2012) InstePP Evaluation report. Oxford Brookes Unversity. Oxford. Fetzner, M. (2013). What do unsuccessful online students want us to know? Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 17(1). Gourlay, L. & Oliver, M. (2014) Learner experiences vs the learner experience: visual and ethnographic methodologies, ELESIG webinar http://elesig.ning.com/page/webinars Jeffrey, L., Bronwyn, H., Oriel, K., Merrolee, P., Coburn, D., & McDonald, J. (2011). Developing digital information literacy in higher education: obstacles and supports. Journal of Information Technology Education, 10, 383-413. Rosen, L. (2012) iDisorder. Understanding our obsession with technology and overcoming its hold on us. Palgrave MacMillan. Weller, M. (2011) The digital scholar: how technology is transforming scholarly practice. Bloomsbury. London. White, Beetham & Wild (2013) Students' expectations and experiences of the digital environment Literature review. http://digitalstudent.jiscinvolve.org

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