Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

British council new delhi_walkerfeb2016 wb

124 views

Published on

This paper summarises recent findings from UCISA case study and survey research on the pace of change in the institutional adoption of technology enhanced learning tools across the UK higher education sector, and will address the rise of student-controlled and creative technologies to promote information, knowledge-sharing and networking in learning and teaching activities. Current generations of students are now arriving on campus with the expectation that their technologies will seamlessly interconnect with university services and support their learning experience. The paper discusses the impact these technological developments are having on the delivery of campus-based courses – specifically the scope that learning technologies now present for innovation in the delivery of the taught curriculum. Through a presentation of case examples from the University of York we consider how the affordances of mobile and online learning technologies are being applied to support active learning opportunities for students.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

British council new delhi_walkerfeb2016 wb

  1. 1. Facilitating active learning opportunities for students through the use of TEL tools: The case for pedagogic innovation and change Dr Richard Walker Head of E-Learning University of York, UK British Council International Seminar on Teaching-Learning and New Technologies in HE India Habitat Centre, New Delhi, India 25-26 Feb 2016
  2. 2. The changing face of higher education Higher education has been reshaped over recent years: – the marketisation of higher education (national & global competition) – demand-driven expansion of UG education – the emergence of students-as-consumers, exerting wishes for new kinds of educational provision; – the potential of new digital technologies; and – the apparent potential (that new educational environments are opening up) for widening higher education at reduced unit costs (Barnett, 2004:8)
  3. 3. Student expectations Expectation that technology will:  Enable more flexible learning (National Union of Students, 2010)  Offer better administration, resource provision and support for independent learning and  Be applied where relevant, but will not undermine contact time on campus (Bone, 2013) Expectation of students as partners, not consumers. Active involvement in:  Scoping and planning TEL developments  Co-creation - curriculum design (Wenstone, 2013)
  4. 4. How should HE institutions respond?  Market differentiation in programme design: – Distinctive portfolio of programmes (design, outcomes & transferable skills) – Flexible entry points and pathways to degree courses, attracting a diverse student body – Flexible delivery methods: increased online provision  Learner engagement (retention & progression): – institutional responsiveness to student expectations and needs (through well-defined academic support and service delivery; greater use of learner analytics) – Ensuring the quality of the student experience through innovative teaching, support & service provision  Learner flexibility: – Flexible and interactive learning experiences through the informed use of digital technologies (evidence-based)
  5. 5. Modes of student engagement using TEL tools  Self-study resources & extension reading  Discussion space & peer support  Formative assessment activities Enabling learning Enhancing learning Transformative learning Extending range of learning opportunities active learning and engagement Increasing flexibility & access to learning  Personalised learning pathways  Collaboration & communities of inquiry  Student-led teaching & discovery-based learning
  6. 6. Blended Learning Models Model Definition Illustrative Features A – VLE Supplemented Optional resources focusing on self- directed learner support Self-study resources & extension reading Space for formative assessment; reflection & space for problem solving & discussion Model Definition Illustrative Features A – VLE Supplemented Optional resources focusing on self- directed learner support Self-study resources & extension reading Space for formative assessment; reflection & space for problem solving & discussion B – VLE Dependent (i) Content (ii) Communication (iii) Collaboration (iv) Assessment Student-centred activities requiring active engagement Online activities for (i), (ii), (iii) or (iv). Online activities linked to face-to-face sessions, also targeted by learning outcomes & assessment Model Definition Illustrative Features A – VLE Supplemented Optional resources focusing on self- directed learner support Self-study resources & extension reading Space for formative assessment; reflection & space for problem solving & discussion B – VLE Dependent (i) Content (ii) Communication (iii) Collaboration (iv) Assessment Student-centred activities requiring active engagement Online activities for (i), (ii), (iii) or (iv). Online activities linked to face-to-face sessions, also targeted by learning outcomes & assessment C – VLE Integrated Online environment as key locus for learning, supporting knowledge acquisition, skills development & assessment Student-staff interaction within VLE, plus face-to-face Activities as per B (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) Learner interaction to resources, assessment & collaboration tasks online
  7. 7. How is flipped learning being used at York?  Preparing students for lab work: ‘Practical work in Chemistry’  Range of instructional videos and compulsory ‘pre-lab’ quiz must be completed (and passed) on the VLE  Establishing baseline knowledge and standards for students to engage in lab work
  8. 8. How is flipped learning being used at York?  Problem-based learning: Law  Case-based learning: Health Sciences – PGDip Nursing: problems presented via online lecture beforehand with prompt questions / cases and preparatory questions to consider before seminar
  9. 9. Sector challenges in the adoption and embedding of TEL  Consumerism and the mainstreaming of student services through learning technologies – broadening the range of technologies but with enterprise-wide goals in mind – speed of change / diversity of systems, services (BYOS) and devices (BYOD) to master and support  Can this be compatible with pedagogic flexibility and the academic freedom to experiment and ‘freedom to fail’?
  10. 10. Institutional provision of tel tools Tool 2014 2012 2010 VLE 95% 100% Other tools: Plagiarism detection 95% 92% 92% E-submission 85% 87% 89% E-portfolio 78% 76% 72% Blog 73% 72% 74% E-assessment 71% 79% 80% PRS/clickers 70% - - Wiki 66% 74% 75% Source: UCISA 2014 TEL survey
  11. 11. SOFTWARE TOOLS USED BY STUDENTS Tool 2014 2012 2010 Social networking 64% 73% 81% Document sharing 62% 52% - Blog 59% 60% 59% Social bookmarking 31% 40% 48% Media streaming 26% - - Source: UCISA 2014 TEL survey
  12. 12. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 2003 2005 2008 2010 2012 2014 A Bi Bii Biii C Progress towards pedagogical innovation Still an emphasis, though slowly reducing, on transmissive teaching methods Category A – web supplemented Category Bi – web dependent, content Category Bii – web dependent, communication Category Biii – web dependent, content and communication Category E – fully online (categories adapted from Bell et al., 2002)
  13. 13. Consequences for teaching and staff development  Upskilling of lecturers’ digital capabilities (NUS, 2010): a new digital divide?  Supporting transition to active learning pedagogical design – Pedagogic craft to embed TEL tools effectively in course design and delivery (e.g. video as stimuli for pre- and in-class learning) – new pedagogic models? Transfer of MOOC inspired pedagogies to on-campus teaching (Yuan, Powell & Oliver, 2014)  Greater use of learner analytics
  14. 14. Consequences for learning: some issues to consider  Dearth of evidence on impact of interventions such as flipped learning: most literature from case- studies & small-scale pilots, usually in US – Do students engage in deeper learning? (Mellefont & Fei, 2014) – Is it suitable for all levels / styles of learning?  How should we respond to students who won’t or can’t engage? (Loch & Borland, 2014) – Cultural adjustments (‘where are the answers?’) & cognitive leap from pre-class to in-class activities (applying theory) – Ethical challenges in leaving students behind – Integrity of learning at risk – staged / linear model (linking ideas) vs. ‘pick and mix’
  15. 15. Questions? Head of E-Learning Development, University of York, UK richard.walker@york.ac.uk Richard Walker
  16. 16. References Barnett, R. (2014). Conditions of flexibility: securing a more responsive higher education system, The Higher Education Academy: York. Bell, M., Bush, D., Nicholson, P, O’Brien, D., & Tran, T. (2002). Universities online: A survey of online education and services in Australia. Canberra: Department of Education, Science and Training. Bone, E. (2013). Improving learning experiences: Student attitudes towards the use of technology. NUS research study sponsored by Desire2Learn. Insights Roadshow, 16 December 2013. Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom.
  17. 17. References Jisc (2014). Digital student project: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/research/projects/digital-student Loch, B. and Borland, R. (2014). The transition from traditional face-to-face teaching to blended learning – implications and challenges from a mathematics discipline perspective. In B. Hegarty, J. McDonald, & S.-K. Loke (Eds.), Rhetoric and Reality: Critical perspectives on educational technology. Proceedings ascilite Dunedin 2014 (pp. 708- 712). Mellefont, L & Fei, J, “Using Echo360 Personal Capture software to create a ‘flipped’ classroom for Microbiology laboratory classes”, Rhetoric and Reality: Proceedings ascilite Dunedin 2014 (pp. 534-538).
  18. 18. References National Union of Students [NUS] (2010). Student perspectives on technology – demand, perceptions and training needs. Report to HEFCE by NUS. http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/rereports/year/2010/studpersptech/ Price, D. (2013). Open: how we'll work, live and learn in the future. Crux Publishing Walker, R., Voce, J., Nicholls, J., Swift, E., Ahmed, J., Horrigan, S., & Vincent, P. (2014). 2014 Survey of Technology Enhanced learning for higher education in the UK. Universities and Colleges Information Systems Association (UCISA) Report. Oxford, UK. http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/tel
  19. 19. References Wenstone, R. (2013). ‘It’s all about the learner’, Keynote speech at ALT-C 2013, Nottingham, UK. 10-12 September 2013. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjINstTYw9U Yuan, l., Powell, S., & Olivier, B. (2014). Beyond MOOCs: Sustainable Online Learning in Institutions. CETIS white paper. http://publications.cetis.ac.uk/2014/898

×