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5 Tips for Using TIA Portal V14 to Decrease Safety Development Time

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Presenter - Ryan Landwehr

The release of Totally Integrated Automation Portal V14 made significant improvements to SIMATIC STEP 7 Safety. We will demonstrate how these new features can decrease development time and significantly decrease wiring while maintaining or improving the SIL or PL.

This presentation will discuss how to use these new features, including S7-1200F PROFIsafe communication and distributed safety using F-I-Device communication. We will also explore ways to program your Siemens safety PLC effectively and efficiently through reusable safety function blocks, PLC data types, and built-in Siemens safety blocks.

Published in: Engineering
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5 Tips for Using TIA Portal V14 to Decrease Safety Development Time

  1. 1. 5 Tips for Using TIA Portal V14 to Decrease Safety Development Time Automation Summit Boca Raton, FL, June 26-28, 2017
  2. 2. DMC Overview Established in 1996, DMC serves customers worldwide from offices in Chicago, Boston, Denver, Houston, New York, and St. Louis employees & growing 120+
  3. 3. Siemens Expertise 31 Siemens Certified Engineers
  4. 4. DMC Customers
  5. 5. Automotive Chemical & Food Processing Consumer Goods Defense Contracting Energy & Utilities Food & Beverage Packaging Pharmaceutical Printing & Textiles Semiconductor Special Machinery Telecommunications Test & Measurement Industries Served
  6. 6. Presenter Info • B.S. in Electrical Engineering • Rose Hulman Institute of Technology • With DMC since 2014 • Siemens Certified Professional • Teaches Rockwell to Siemens Training classes across US. Ryan Landwehr Project Engineer (Houston)
  7. 7. 1. Converting to V14 Safety – How and Why? 2. Shared Device with Safety 3. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC data types 4. Safety I-Device Communication 5. Safety Program Do’s & Don’t’s
  8. 8. 1200F (FW4.2) – distributed safety over profinet Converting to V14 Safety – Why?
  9. 9. 1500F – CPUs with 2 Ethernet NICs and FW2.0+ can have two Profinet networks (both safety capable) Converting to V14 Safety – Why?
  10. 10. Safety Version 2.0 can greatly reduce compile time Converting to V14 Safety – Why?
  11. 11. Better Online/Offline Comparison • V13 SP1 comparison based on timestamp • V14 comparison based on configurable criteria Converting to V14 Safety – Why?
  12. 12. 1. Update CPU Firmware to V2.0 2. Update Safety System version to V2.0 3. Clean up system generated objects 4. Compile Converting to V14 Safety – How? 1 2 3
  13. 13. • Safety Signature will change, but functionality will not • Acceptance test is not required Converting to V14 Safety – What Changed?
  14. 14. 1. Converting to V14 Safety – How and Why? 2. Shared Device with Safety 3. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC data types 4. Safety I-Device Communication 5. Safety Program Do’s & Don’t’s
  15. 15. Reduce your wiring effort, hardware cost, and overall footprint Shared Device with Safety
  16. 16. Limitation – Shared Device requires two separate TIA Portal Projects HW Configs Shared Device with Safety Safety PLC Project Standard PLC Project
  17. 17. Configuration – Safety PLC Interface module unassigned for both projects Safety Modules Non-Safety Modules
  18. 18. Configuration – Standard PLC Interface module unassigned for both projects Safety Modules Non-Safety Modules
  19. 19. Typical Use Cases: • One F-CPU, one Standard CPU sharing one (or multiple) ET200 Remote IO Racks • One F-CPU, one Standard CPU sharing a G120 • Implementing Safety in a motion project: one F-CPU, one Simotion Controller Shared Device Notes
  20. 20. 1. Converting to V14 Safety – How and Why? 2. Shared Device with Safety 3. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC data types 4. Safety I-Device Communication 5. Safety Program Do’s & Don’t’s
  21. 21. F-suitable PLC Data Type • Just like a standard PLC Data Type but can be used in safety program • Example – Drive Safety Telegram Reusable Function Blocks and PLC Data Types
  22. 22. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC Data Types
  23. 23. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC Data Types
  24. 24. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC Data Types Tips for using F-Function Blocks • Use them for repetitive logic, in the same manner you would use a standard Function Block • Use built-in FB’s whenever applicable
  25. 25. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC Data Types Combine FB and PLC Data Type for Efficiency
  26. 26. Example: ESTOP1
  27. 27. Example: FDBACK
  28. 28. 1. Converting to V14 Safety – How and Why? 2. Shared Device with Safety 3. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC data types 4. Safety I-Device Communication 5. Safety Program Do’s & Don’t’s
  29. 29. Configuring Failsafe communication between S7-1200/1500 F-CPUs Configuration IO-Controller IO-Device
  30. 30. HW Config - Telegrams IO-Controller IO-Device
  31. 31. HW Config - Additional Settings IO-Controler IO-Device
  32. 32. Safety Program (IO-Device) IO-Controller IO-Device
  33. 33. Safety Program (IO-Controller) IO-Controller IO-Device
  34. 34. Safety Program Overview IO-Controller IO-Device
  35. 35. Safety I-Device Communication Same Project Different Projects F-I-Device F-I-Device via GSDML F-I-Device via Proxy PLC S7-300 Yes Yes Yes S7-1200/1500 Yes No Yes Shared Device S7-300 Yes S7-1200/1500 No Failsafe I-Device Compatibility Failsafe Shared I-Device Compatibility
  36. 36. 1. Converting to V14 Safety – How and Why? 2. Shared Device with Safety 3. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC data types 4. Safety I-Device Communication 5. Safety Program Do’s & Don’t’s
  37. 37. DO limit use of Safety Timers • Safety time blocks (F-TP, F-TON, F-TOF) require additional code in the compiled program • Adding OR deleting time processing blocks increases compile time Safety Program Do’s & Don’t‘s
  38. 38. DO Limit Nested Global Data Use, DO Utilize block interfaces • Global accesses on failsafe data need codes in each block with access on the failsafe data and it’s calls. The deeper the calling level, the more code is generated. Safety Program Do’s & Don’t‘s TL;DR – Use block interfaces instead of nested global accesses
  39. 39. DO use a coupler DB to share signals between standard and safety programs • Without this, small changes in standard program can cause a safety program compilation (STOP mode download) Safety Program Do’s & Don’t‘s
  40. 40. DO NOT use system clock bits in safety program • System clock timers run asynchronously and can change in between standard and coded processing, resulting in a safety fault • If needed, map to a Global DB Safety Program Do’s & Don’t‘s
  41. 41. DO NOT use M-bits in the safety program. • You can read/write standard datablocks that are read in the safety program so there is no reason to do this anymore • Use M-bits for debugging operations, not permanent logic Safety Program Do’s & Don’t‘s M
  42. 42. DO use AlwaysTRUE and AlwaysFALSE system memory bits in safety program • These are valid to use in the safety program. • Can also map them to local memory if desired Safety Program Do’s & Don’t‘s
  43. 43. DO set your F-Destination Addresses • Need to be set in order to function properly • Do NOT throw away the coding element (little piece of plastic) Safety Program Do’s & Don’t‘s
  44. 44. DO perform regular program backups via webserver Safety Program Do’s & Don’t‘s
  45. 45. Last, but not least…
  46. 46. DO • Use block interfaces instead of global data access • Use Coupler DBs • Use built-in AlwaysFALSE/AlwaysTRUE • Assign F-Destination Address • Keep it simple DON’T • Use F-Timers unless necessary • Use M-memory unless necessary • Use system clock byte in safety program EVER Do’s and Don’t’s Recap
  47. 47. 1. Converting to V14 Safety – How and Why? 2. Shared Device with Safety 3. Reusable Function Blocks and PLC data types 4. Safety I-Device Communication 5. Safety Program Do’s & Don’t’s
  48. 48. End Presentation Questions?

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