Recruit Select Train!

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Jason Dubose, The Ingenuity Center of the University of Texas at Tyler
Texas ACE Conference 2013
Austin, Texas

Published in: Education, Career
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Recruit Select Train!

  1. 1. F I N D I N G H I G H L Y Q U A L I F I E D A F T E R S C H O O L S T A F F RECRUIT, SELECT TRAIN
  2. 2. RECRUIT SEEKING EMPLOYEES
  3. 3. HOW DO I ADVERTISE? WHERE DO I LOOK FOR EMPLOYEES? Recruit Local Colleges and universities Contacts Student Organizations Student Career Center HR and Fingerprinting Parent/Community Volunteers Program Needs Local organizations Connections Your Best Current Employees Chamber of Commerce *Check your partner ISD’s policies. Afterschool Staff should possess: 1. Competence 2. Capability 3. Commitment 4. Cultural Fit 5. Upbeat http://www.fruitvaleisd.codefault.aspx?name=Employment
  4. 4. BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND •What is your vision and mission for your afterschool program? •What type of teachers would work well with your students? •Who is your ideal teacher?
  5. 5. EMPOWERING YOUR STAFF: VISION WHY IS VISION IMPORTANT? • A shared vision is powerful and necessary for success. • Teachers who feel in control of their environment will naturally perform higher than their peers who do not feel empowered within their classrooms. • Once your teachers feel empowered and invested, they begin to share a vision for student, campus, and district success. • The quality of your staff starts with you. How much time and how much effort are you willing to give of yourself?
  6. 6. EMPOWERING YOUR STAFF SHARING YOUR VISION “Schools are complex places, and teaching is a difficult and challenging job… “…Many schools do not have a clear and shared sense of purpose focused on student learning. Yet, without it, programs become fragmented, teachers lose motivation, and improvement efforts fail… “Without a clear notion of what is important, work can become dissipated and undirected.” North Central Regional Educational Laboratory Kent Peterson, University of Wisconsin- Madison. 1995
  7. 7. MUST HAVES Identify your Non-Negotiables: • Coachable spirit • Quick Learner • Worked with children before • Gets along well with others • Pinpoint the traits of your ideal teacher.
  8. 8. INTROSPECTIVE LOOK AT EMPLOYEES WANTED What kind of prospective employees are we trying to attract to our organization? What kind of people will it take to get the results we want and others expect? What kind of people do we want to surround ourselves with? What kind of people will contribute to the culture we are trying to build? Recognize and look for needed skills such as STEM, arts and crafts, sports, etc.
  9. 9. SELECT SIFT FOR THE CREAM OF THE CROP
  10. 10. CREATE YOUR INTERVIEW QUESTIONS • What do you want to know? • How will this information help lead you to your ideal teacher? • Formulate questions that detect/isolate your non-negotiables. • Activity: Take a moment to brainstorm three interview questions with partners at your table.
  11. 11. SAMPLE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS
  12. 12. STRUCTURING THE INTERVIEW • Allow prospective candidates to preview questions before the interview. • How long will you speak with each candidate? • Take notes on each candidate? • Pick a time frame for contacting all candidates on whether or not they got the job.
  13. 13. SELECT THE TOP CANDIDATES ONLY • Use your gut---those employees that seem trainable with a coachable spirit on the interview usually are. • Note: Select only those employees that seem motivated and those that obviously fit your non-negotiables. • BEWARE--Candidates that seem lackadaisical, laid back, non-interactive on the interview will be lackadaisical, laid back, and non-interactive at work. What you see if what you get!! If you have reservations, do not ignore them. • Don’t just fill a position to get a warm body.
  14. 14. YOU CAN’T TRAIN PERSONALITY You can train an employee on your product or service, but you can’t train someone to have integrity, resiliency, self-confidence and work ethic. The smaller the business, the more crucial any hire is. Be flexible on background requirements, but continue to be stringent on personality traits.
  15. 15. TRAIN EMPOWER YOUR STAFF, CREATE YOUR DREAM TEAM
  16. 16. SCHEDULE TRAINING DAYS The best teachers never stop learning. Trainings should focus on topics that will help improve the quality of programming Target problematic areas in programming Reinforce topics that are crucial to programming Provide trainings at least once a month for 3-4 hours
  17. 17. EMPOWERING YOUR STAFF: CONTROL • Control over how and what one teaches is crucial to educator contentment and work satisfaction. • A happy teacher leads to effective education and increased student success. • Inspire your staff to research innovative methods and topics then visit with them about their ideas. • Offer your time and assistance when they begin their unit or lesson planning. • Encourage their ingenuity and creativity. • Listen! Make time for them and be an active listener.
  18. 18. KEY TRAINING TOPICS Vision for quality programming Professionalism Attendance Student Safety/supervision Classroom management Managing Conflict Payroll Needs/Concerns Dress Code
  19. 19. EMPOWERING YOUR STAFF: QUALITY • Allowing your teachers to invest in their content knowledge and instruction will assist you and them with increasing the quality of their: • content ownership • their instructional skills • practices and methodology • Giving them your time, listening to their ideas, encouraging their designs and ingenuity will provide them a sense of investment which can: • Increase passion for their subject • Increase overall attitude within the classroom and school community • Increase enjoyment for what and how they are teaching the subject
  20. 20. EMPOWERING YOUR STAFF: START WITH THE DRIVER’S SEAT As teachers are given greater control over their work, voluntary turnover goes from 50 percent to near zero. (See table next slide) Source: Who Control’s Teacher Work? –Peter Ingersoll Ingersoll’s research showed that where teacher involvement in decision-making was low, turnover was high. But where the involvement of teachers in school decision-making was high, turnover tended to be low. The school culture improved, and job satisfaction rose.

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