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Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
Moodle and the Living Curriculum
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Moodle and the Living Curriculum

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Presentation for Ascilite 2012 by Tabitha Roder and Nicoletta Rata-Skudder.

Presentation for Ascilite 2012 by Tabitha Roder and Nicoletta Rata-Skudder.

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  • 1. Moodle and the Living Curriculum
  • 2. Unitec
  • 3. Past History>> UNITEC INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
  • 4. Distance & Flexible Education Capability Assessment>> UNITEC INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
  • 5. Distance & Flexible Education Capability Assessment>> UNITEC INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
  • 6. Living Curriculum and eLearning Strategy Key Characteristics • complex conversations, curiosity or inquiry led and stimulating, focus on practice, social constructivism,blended learning experiences, research-informed, discipline based and interdisciplinary, literacies for lifelong learning and embedded assessment
  • 7. Living Curriculum Principles of Teaching and Learningconversation, curiosity/ enquiry, collaboration, self- efficacy, problem-solving, creativity and reflection Phormium IMG_2942 by Brett Oliver
  • 8. Key Themes Conversations Enquiry Autonomy Discipline
  • 9. How does Moodle fit with the Living Curriculum?
  • 10. How does Moodle fit with the Living Curriculum?Trojan Horse (2) By GoGap
  • 11. Affordances in Realising a Living CurriculumAffordances describe the properties or qualities which can potentially enable an action Affordances may encourage certain actions/ behaviours BUT User perceptions (influenced by culture, context and dispositions) are most influential in determining how the tool is used Chrysalis (Before) by Steven2005
  • 12. Conversations and Ako as Puawaitanga Conversations Ako as Conversations about enquiry, knowledge, practice, how learners puawaitanga learning and teaching are significant for engage with Ako engagement between and among learners, teachers, self and others acknowledges practitioners, communities, scholars, and with self to develop that curriculum and texts. Conversation develops beyond chat or understandings development discussion and becomes true dialogue that involves derives from analysis, synthesis, critical thinking and reflection. diverse forms Effective conversations help to build inclusive of intercultural relationships, involve questions as well as answer, communicatio and facilitate the expression of different points of n. view. Conversations are contextually situated, and both technology and relationships mediate and facilitate conversations. Excerpt from: Unitec, (n.d.) Ako: learning together [Brochure]. Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand.
  • 13. Enquiry and Ako as Wānanga Enquiry Ako as wānanga. The process of enquiry is at the heart of the how Wānanga informs the tertiary learning experience. It necessitates learners curriculum through critical reflecting on the world within the go about enquiry. The relationship perspective of a domain, formulating a asking of the learner and the question, locating information in response to and teacher is interdependent, the question, interpreting and testing ideas answering and reciprocal for personal and information, generating and synthesising questions and communal good. In ideas, and presenting and reflecting on the this context, the teacher is process. Synthesis, reflection and evaluation prepared to learn from the will in turn generate questions for further learner. exploration. Excerpt from: Unitec, (n.d.) Ako: learning together [Brochure]. Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand.
  • 14. Autonomy and Ako as Mana Autonomy Ako as mana. Mana binds the Individuals taking increasing charge of how learners authority of learner and their own learning, which may be best increasingly teacher with matauranga achieved through a scaffolded and develop their (knowledge). Integrity is staged process of learning how to capability developed through a process learn, planning, managing and and of poutama (scaffolded reflecting on the process and products confidence learning). of learning. Excerpt from: Unitec, (n.d.) Ako: learning together [Brochure]. Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand.
  • 15. Discipline and Ako as Kaupapa Discipline Ako as kaupapa. Defined as a community of practice which has a how learners Kaupapa is a (contested and evolving) body of knowledge and engage with process by which theory, based on particular ways of knowing and the knowledge intellect practising, which is taught and applied and that underpins internalises, researched. A discipline has its own literacies the discipline distinguishes and and language. Members of the discipline creates new (faculty, learners, practitioners, scholars, etc) knowledge. identify with this community of practice and help to induct new members. Excerpt from: Unitec, (n.d.) Ako: learning together [Brochure]. Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand.
  • 16. Affordances in Realising a Living CurriculumAffordances describe the properties or qualities which can potentially enable an action AND Affordances may encourage certain actions/ behaviours BUT User perceptions (influenced by culture, context and dispositions) are most influential in determining how the tool is used Chrysalis (Before) by Steven2005
  • 17. Considering Teacher Dispositions“…habits of mind ... that filter ones knowledge,skills, and beliefs and impact the action one takesin a classroom...” (Thornton, 2006)“[Dispositions] are the source of the recognition(or misrecognition) of learning opportunities andprovide strategy and motivation for the inevitableimprovisation that is learning” (Carr et al., 2010)
  • 18. Considering Teacher DispositionsTeachers who engage with new innovations thatsignificantly differ from their usual practices, andthe cultural norms of their teaching environmentsare generally ill-equipped for success.As learners successfully develop competenciesthey become more inclined to apply them andrecognise the opportunities and reasons for doingso.
  • 19. Considering Teacher DispositionsClaxton and Carr (2004) suggest “theenvironment may need to invite learners toparticipate, actively engage them and includetheir prior knowledge in conversations andinteractions of joint attention, or provoke them torecognise opportunities that are unfamiliar andnew” (cited in Carr et al., 2010)
  • 20. Supporting Teachers to Develop and Transfer Dispositions“…teachers need to know the affordances andconstraints of various technologies and howspecific technologies might support their ownteaching practices and curricular goals” (Zhao etal, 2002)
  • 21. Supporting Teachers to Develop and Transfer DispositionsTishman, Jay and Perkins (1993) suggest thinkingdispositions are learned through a process ofenculturation, and use four elements in teaching thinkingdispositions: modelling, explanations, peer interactionsand both formal and informal feedback.Zhao et al. (2002) found three significant factors forsuccess: technology proficiency, pedagogical compatibility,and social awareness
  • 22. Summary The affordances of an LMS can align closely withan institutional pedagogy, and can help encouragespecific design-intended behaviours in teachers andlearners.However teacher perceptions influence how orwhether the affordances are recognised.The dispositions required can be learned andtransferred.
  • 23. SummaryIntentional strategies need to be employed to addressteachers perceptions if they are to successfully transfertheir teaching dispositions to the new context,knowledge and perceptions. Literature suggests an iterative teacher training andsupport process which involves practical technologyuse, an interactive group context which encouragesreflection and communication on the technologies andtheir pedagogical potential/ application.
  • 24. Future Directions
  • 25. DSP 147: Thank You! 2007-10-11By vernhart
  • 26. Image CreditsChrysalis (Before) by Steven2005(http://farm1.staticflickr.com/100/295999531_ce0b1a6f06.jpg )Phormium IMG_2942 by Brett Oliver(http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1266/1246712235_85b2a26571.jpg)Building #1 by By cogdogblog (Alan Levine)(http://farm1.staticflickr.com/2/2472100_1f14617e42.jpg)Trojan Horse (2) By GoGap(http://farm1.staticflickr.com/104/253649673_4eed26ea98.jpg)DSP 147: Thank You! 2007-10-11By vernhart(http://www.flickr.com/photos/vernhart/1574355240/sizes/m/in/photostream/)
  • 27. Presentation ReferencesFull References can be found in Roder, T. & Rata-Skudder, N. (2012) Moodle and theLiving Curriculum Carr, M., Smith, A. B., Duncan, J., Jones, C., Lee, W., & Marshall, K. (2010). Learning in theMaking: Disposition and Design in Early Education. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers John, P., & Sutherland, R. (2005). Affordance, opportunity and the pedagogical implicationsof ICT. Educational Review, 57(4), 405-413.McLoughlin, C., & Lee, M. J. W. (2007). Social software and participatory learning: Pedagogicalchoices with technology affordances in the Web 2.0 era. Paper presented at Ascilite: Singapore.Roder, T., & Rata-Skudder, N. (2012, 14-15 September 2012). A community approach to staffdevelopment in eLearning. Paper presented at the 1st Moodle Research Conference, Heraklion,Crete-Greece. Thornton, H. (2006). Dispositions in action: do dispositions make a difference in practice?Teacher Education Quarterly, 33(2).Tishman, S., Jay, E., & Perkins, D. N. (1992). Teaching Thinking Dispositions: From Transmissionto Enculturation. Harvard University, Cambridge. Retrieved fromhttp://learnweb.harvard.edu/alps/thinking/docs/article2.html Unitec, (n.d.). Ako: learning together [Brochure]. Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand. Unitec, (2010). Mapping the Living Curriculum [Internal document]. Unitec, Auckland, NewZealand. Zhao, Y., Pugh, K., Sheldon, S., & Byers, J. L. (2002). Conditions for Classroom TechnologyInnovations. Teachers College Record, 104(3), 482-515.

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