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NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery
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NOTES: MCN 2013 (ffrench) Minimal Friction, Maximal Use: Optimizing Open Access Image Delivery

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Notes for the slides: This presentation demonstrates the processes in place that enable the Yale University Art Gallery to make works available online as part of our Open Access policy.

Notes for the slides: This presentation demonstrates the processes in place that enable the Yale University Art Gallery to make works available online as part of our Open Access policy.

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  • 1. My  name  is  John  ffrench  and  I  am  the  Director  of  Visual  Resources  at  the  Yale   University  Art  Gallery.  I  oversee  the  imaging  department  which  photographs  the   collecBon  and  also  events,  exhibiBons,  etc  as  well  as  overseeing  the  Rights  and   ReproducBons  office  who  deal  with  the  disseminaBon  of  images  for  external  requests   and  clearing  of  rights  for  internal  projects.   2  
  • 2. Once  Open  Access  was  announced  in  2011,  it  quickly  became  apparent  that  a  campus   commiNee  would  be  needed  to  address  various  issues  related  to  Open  Access.   Perhaps  surprisingly  one  of  the  things  we  needed  to  iniBally  tackle  was  what  was  the   definiBon  of  Public  Domain.  With  the  various  collecBons  on  campus  there  were   varying  copyright  laws  that  needed  to  be  considered  and  no  firm  hard  line  could  be   easily  drawn  (at  least  not  without  going  too  far  back  in  Bme).   At  the  Gallery,  and  in  general  at  Yale,  the  determinaBon  was  that  a  creaBon  date  of   1923  or  earlier  would  be  a  safe  enough  rule  to  put  in  place,  this  of  course  has  some   grey  area  as  some  arBst  died  less  than  70  years  ago  but  created  works  prior  to  1923.   In  those  cases  we  look  at  the  arBsts  and  the  works  to  make  determinaBons  on  how   comfortable  we  feel.   For  cultural  objects  (African  Art  and  Indo-­‐Pacific  Art  as  well  as  Coins  and  Medals)  we   made  the  decision  to  make  those  available  –  not  labeled  as  Public  Domain,  but  rather   ‘cultural  object’.   Due  to  costs  involved  in  researching  whether  copyright  was  indeed  applied  for  in   these  early  works  at  Bmes  we  find  it  easier  to  agree  to  pay  Rights  usage  fees  rather   than  try  to  assert  a  public  domain  claim.   Something  on  campus  we  are  sBll  working  through  is  what  defines  PublicaBon  when   it  comes  to  copyright,  and  other  issues  are  sBll  being  addressed  by  the  commiNee.   3  
  • 3. CollecBvely  on  campus  the  various  groups  parBcipaBng  in  Open  Access  came  up  with   a  list  of  what  we  felt  would  be  FAQs  and  can  all  point  our  websites  to  this  one   locaBon  for  a  common  voice.   4  
  • 4. At  YUAG  we  use  TMS  by  Gallery  System  as  our  collecBons  database.  We  see  TMS  as   the  object  authority  and  this  is  where  we  store  basic  informaBon  about  the   Intellectual  Property  rights  for  objects.     This  is  an  important  beginning  phase  for  us  as  several  fields  within  TMS  and  the  R&R   screen  create  triggers  for  workflows  down  the  line     5  
  • 5. One  of  our  systems  programmers  has  wriNen  code  that  can  automaBcally  assign   some  informaBon  about  rights  by  looking  at  the  date  created  field  whenever  a  new   record  is  created  in  the  database.  Each  night  the  program  runs  and  then  sends  an  e-­‐ mail  to  designated  staff  who  can  review  the  seengs  and  as  needed  make   adjustments.     6  
  • 6. UBlizing  the  ORT  field  in  TMS  we  assign  objects  as  being  unknown,  under  copyright  -­‐   to  varying  degrees,  or  in  the  Public  Domain.  At  the  Gallery  we  have  automated  much   of  this  by  drawing  a  line  in  the  copyright  sand  by  deciding  the  objects  created  prior  to   1923  were  for  the  most  part  Public  Domain.  Those  between  1923-­‐1935  require  more   research  before  we  can  switch  them  over  (Status  Unclear)  or  the  are  leh  as  Not   Assigned  unBl  we  have  done  the  research  as  to  Copyright  status.     We  also  made  the  decision  that  objects  in  our  African  Art,  Indo-­‐Pacific  Art  and  Coins   and  Medals  departments  would  all  be  made  available  for  download.  Those  prior  to   1923  are  marked  as  Public  Domain,  those  aher  1923  are  marked  as  Cultural  Object.  In   discussions  with  the  curators  of  those  departments  they  felt  the  maker  was  not   something  that  would  be  generally  known,  or  it  was  a  tribal  effort  to  make  the  object   so  there  was  no  one  maker.  We  have  made  a  definiBon  of  what  Cultural  Object  is  to   YUAG  on  our  ‘using  images’  page.     7  
  • 7. If  a  work  is  under  copyright  and  we  can  idenBfy  who  the  rights  holder  is,  we  enter   that  informaBon  in  TMS  by  linking  them  as  a  rights  consBtuent  (we  store  address,   phone,  email,  contact  name,  etc)  and  then  we  also  enter  in  the  Copyright  string  the   arBst/foundaBon  has  requested  be  used  in  reproducBons.  This  informaBon   programmaBcally  then  appears  on  our  website  below  the  image  (I'll  speak  more  to   this  shortly)     8  
  • 8. For  works  which  are  under  copyright,  but  where  we  have  a  wriNen  agreement  in   place  with  the  arBst  to  display  more  than  a  thumbnail,  we  set  the  ORT  accordingly   and  then  also  link  the  PDF  file  and  file  name  to  TMS.    In  this  case  shown  here,  the   ArBst  Kerry  James  Marshall  gave  YUAG  permissions  to  display  his  works  online  at   larger  than  a  thumbnail,  but  also  gave  us  non-­‐exclusive  permission  to  use  images  of   his  work  in  YUAG  created  publicaBons  without  needing  to  seek  permission  each  Bme.     9  
  • 9. One  thing  we  have  added  to  the  acquisiBon  process  since  Open  Access  came  along  is   that  we  now  ask  a  set  of  quesBons  on  our  Deed  of  Gih  forms  so  that  donors  can   share  informaBon  with  us  about  the  objects  they  are  giving/selling  the  Gallery.  More   recently  we  have  split  the  deed  of  gih  form  into  one  for  Objects  in  Public  Domain,   and  one  for  those  not  to  ease  the  load.     10  
  • 10. Moving  more  towards  the  nuts  and  bolts  of  delivering  images,  most  of  the  cultural   insBtuBons  at  Yale  use  the  same  DAM,  Media  Manager  by  Open  Text  which  beyond   managing  our  digital  assets,  also  allows  us  to  manage  the  permission  seengs  for  files.   The  ORTs  which  are  set  in  TMS  are  then  mapped  to  MM  to  create  what  we  call  CDS   numbers.  CDS  stands  for  Content  Delivery  Service  which  is  a  program  that  exports   derivaBve  files  from  Media  Manager  and  makes  them  available  to  our  various   content  providers  (mainly  our  websites,  but  we  are  also  now  working  with  ARTstor  to   give  them  access  to  this)     In  MM  the  informaBon  is  stored,  and  is  editable  to  R&R  staff  and  curators.  They  can   adjust  CDS  seengs  as  needed  to  in  some  cases  shield  the  image  from  view,  but  sBll   be  accessible  within  our  MM.     11  
  • 11. On  our  website  we  are  providing  images  of  any  works  in  our  collecBons  with  at   minimum  a  thumbnail  image  (following  AAMDs  thumbnail  policy).  We  do  provide  the   rights  informaBon  where  we  have  it,  fed  from  TMS,  and  we  then  provide  a  link  to  our   R&R  page.  Currently  we  require  people  to  fill  out  a  PDF  and  e-­‐mail  that  in,  but  are   finalizing  work  to  have  an  online  webform  people  can  fill  out  and  submit     12  
  • 12. 13  
  • 13. On  our  website  we  are  providing  images  of  any  works  in  our  collecBons  with  at   minimum  a  thumbnail  image  (following  AAMDs  thumbnail  policy).  We  do  provide  the   rights  informaBon  where  we  have  it,  fed  from  TMS,  and  we  then  provide  a  link  to  our   R&R  page.  Currently  we  require  people  to  fill  out  a  PDF  and  e-­‐mail  that  in,  but  are   finalizing  work  to  have  an  online  webform  people  can  fill  out  and  submit.     14  
  • 14. For  works  in  the  Public  domain  we  are  making  a  Powerpoint  'presentaBon'  image   available  to  users  as  well  as  a  20MB  Bff  file.  The  20MB  Bff  was  based  on  ARTstors  IAP   model  of  image  sizes  and  we  felt  would  sit  most  users  needs.  Where  we  have   mulBple  images  available  we  offer  that  to  users  as  well.  JPF  files  are  direct  download,   however  Tiff  files  require  a  user  to  pass  through  captcha,  this  is  to  reduce  the  risk  of  a   robot  program  going  through  and  scrapping  all  our  images  -­‐  more  of  a  performance   issue.   If  users  want  larger  than  a  20MB  file  they  an  request  that  and  using  the  R&R  form  will   be  sent  the  full  size  Bff  via  HighTail  (aka  YouSendIT)     15  
  • 15. As  parBally  a  selfless  plug,  but  more  so  to  promote  work  that  has  begun  on  a   publicaBon  which  will  cover  various  topics  of  Rights  and  ReproducBons  and  cover   Open  Acces,  Public  Domain,  etc  as  part  of  its  topics.  If  you  have  other  topics  you   would  like  to  see  covered  contact  Anne  Young  of  the  IMA.   16  
  • 16. Thank  you  for  your  Bme,  and  please  contact  me  if  you  have  quesBons.   17  

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