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The Liberal Arts
Association
A CIVIC PROJECT BUILDING AND SUPPORTING A DIGITAL “KNOWLEDGE” BANKING
PLATFORM
LIBERAL ARTS ASSOCIATION OVERVIEW - VOLUME 1
M e d i a P r o p h e t
Identity - Dignity - Liberty
© Media Prophet
This Ebook was published by Timothy Charles Holborn. All Rights are Reserved. Throughout this multimedia document, a range of 3rd party publications have been incorpo-
rated. The intellectual property of these parties remain the property of those parties. References to the source of these articles has been supplied throughout the document.
i
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A Non-Transferrable License has been provided to you solely from MediaProphet. This license entitles you to review the mate-
rial for consideration in regards to any further participation with MediaProphet in its project concerning the establishment of
the Australian Liberal Arts Association and its business affairs. If you have any further queries relating to this proposal, you are
invited to contact Timothy Charles Holborn, of Barwite, Victoria Australia by way of email: timothy.holborn@gmail.com skype:
sailing_digital or mobile phone on +61 4 50257 734 (or locally on 0450 157 734). I hope you enjoy this presentation.
Tim Holborn started working on the idea of knowledge banking in 2000. The Name, “Sailing Digital”, coined in 2003. The work
surrounding this proposed platform already the subject of development and failed design.
The term “Sailing Digital” sought to bring together the concept of sailing, with a crew, through a digital ocean. A personable con-
cepts, relaying the need to ensuring the people, survive the journey, and that the purpose of the journey can be achieved. Back
then, tim was working on Consumer Electronics, with a partner from Taiwan
Over the many years, works developed. The plans, The ideas have faced numerous iterations, numerous strategies. Some of the
first Video Content Businesses, delivered. Yet tim still seeks to achieve something that was the principal, the fundamental concept,
still, not available in the market.
The idea, that our works, when delivered over digital medium, should have a means to be protected if we want it to be. The ability
to define business rules, to digital assets and objects. Content, has always faced severe challenges in how “products” are associated
to revenue for content producers. With distribution, exploited or developed without even so much as an acknowledgement for the
contribution, being commonplace for as long as i can remember.
When i was a kid, i got on my bike and within a community of friends; figured out how computers worked, by copying software,
making it run. Getting software to run, wasn’t as easy as it is today. Along with the software, were motion gifs, a treasure-trove for
all teenage boys. The idea, of using computers to compile and distribute “art”, is perhaps age-old. The Idea of trying to protect con-
tent, equally old. But they’ve never really figured it out.
The problem is not just the security, but also, the ability to allow “beneficial” reuse. Rules for content, changes depending on what
it is. In our present market, the question must not only be posed for games, office word-processing software and the like; but also,
access to medical records, business plans, emails - the almost limitless universality of data, applied to all things in our lives.
Sailing Digital
The Knowledge Capital Platform
I first time i put these ideas to paper was in early 2000.
Young and Poor, I had tried to start a business building and
selling what became known as “Media PC’s”, back then, i
wanted to build a computer that worked on my TV.
Through the course of this process, i came across my first busi-
ness partner.
Overtime, we developed the ideas. I was introduced to heads
of Microsoft, told about XML. Regardless, i never sold a box.
Instead, rather, we found international firms developing the
same sort of thing; called “set top boxes”. My business part-
ner left for Israel, ceased communications.
From this point; i realized that all that work; put into docu-
ments, a business opportunity - all lost, to “good-faith”.
So I commenced work on what i then called “iBank”, an intel-
lectual property bank. I wanted to find a way (at least for oth-
ers) to support the protection of a business plan, that often
takes months to develop, understanding of course; that the
principle had far-greater potential. The business partner re-
turned, i presented him the new work; seeking support to de-
velop it.
He said he wanted to build an “online data storage” service.
With many in the market already, and with a name he pro-
vided - basedrive - I combined the theories, considered the
idea of an operating system; base, “like your arse” and drive
“like your going somewhere”... A GUI based interface, like the
windows start-bar - but one, for what you’ve got on your ma-
chine and another for what’s available on the network.
Something that worked with multiple devices, something that
used online the net to store both the operating code; as well as
the content. Something that could providing access to com-
mon or similar assets, on multiple devices through internet
based services. A system that aided with discovery, license
and use of content on all types of devices, connected to the
internet.
iii
Basedrive was my first “Cloud Computing” project. The
concept was based upon a neural network, using a concept
of synaptic networks as a base-theory...
Basedrive Concept Presentation.
Back then of course; Macromedia Flash, the leading interac-
tive website technology, couldn’t connect to a database; there
were few alternatives around, in how to deliver it. We worked
with Sun Microsystems, their language “java” and “jini”, capa-
ble of providing a great-deal of the functionality, and the
higher-level functions, required to develop the software plat-
form. We focused on TV, considering remote controls, Palm
Pilots were the market leaders, with Microsoft CE devices
emerging; both with color screens, and with “WiFi”.
The project developed over several years. Through this pro-
ject i became integrally involved with project managers at the
national telecommunications company, Telstra. We worked
discussed the idea with the local partner relations manager at
Apple; and worked closely with SMSMT, a major Telstra con-
sultancy firms; understanding of course, that all sorts of peo-
ple were engaged, including accenture and an array of other
potential partners. Due to the scope of the project, we became
involved in defining an array of other initiatives at the time.
“lets make transparency support for linux”, one partner said.
In another example; one of our team leaders, set-up a a wire-
less company. After he had been present during a debate
about how to get a TV connected to the internet; that we
needed wireless, because most people would not want a “blue
cable” strung from where the modem and computer were lo-
cated in the house (generally the study); through to the televi-
sion.
At the same-time, we were working with a major wireless
equipment firm. The telecommunications company wanted to
charge thousands per month, for a connection between two
ends of a major street in the city, or between the Worldcom
Datacentre, and our office in the middle of Collins st, Mel-
bourne. We then got into a discussion about setting up what
is now called a “public hotspot” provider. We wanted to help
them set the infrastructure up, in return for some support in
terms of providing access to the network for content delivery.
Our former team-member, establishing his new wireless busi-
ness; subsequently delivering some of Australia’s first Public
WiFi infrastructure.
So, although the business was not forfilled to its vision, and
economic revenues were never really identified properly; The
business forged new ground, collaboratively with a range of
partners. ISP’s didn’t sell content before we started. Wireless,
was in its infancy. Internet Devices, were in their infancy. In-
teractive TV, was forging its first standards, DVB-MHP.
There were agreements we made, but the reality in how they
were implemented; were impractical at best, implausible per-
haps, when considering the situations with the benefit of hind-
sight. At the time, i was rather unaware of the broader issues
at hand. With hindsight, the business model was flawed. It’s
used often nowadays, the Idea of aggregating all sorts of con-
tent, compiling it into something, is demonstrated by a range
of international organisations; including Apple’s itunes and
“appstore” strategies, neither of which existed at the time.
We had ideas, designed into practical solutions; but without
capital, they went no-where. The platform, never developed.
iv
Did we patent any of this? No.
The facts was there was no funding to figure out what to pat-
ent, let alone going through the patent process, something at
the time i did not have the suitable amount of skills to trans-
late to a patent attorney. We’d get these technical consult-
ants, who’s ask a bunch of questions - then go get a job else-
where, perhaps after asking for ridiculous sums of money, in
return for their assistance.
Patents; In terms of commercial value, it still seems are rather
meaningless to a would-be patentee. Unless, the individual
seeking a patent, has the funds and competency to manage
the production and use of the patent “title”; patents, have be-
come largely a pointless waste of money. The raw cost of a pat-
ent, or other form of intellectual property registration is often
in the tens or hundreds of thousands. It is not simply the ca-
pacity for an individual to “invent” something that is impor-
tant, but also their capacity to author and lodge the correct pa-
perwork; in the correct format. To do so, in a multitude of
countries. Even if a patent is lodged, the likelihood that it be-
comes the “key”, to ensuring an inventor retains a commercial
return for their work; is generally unlikely. Unless the patent
holder has the necessary financial capacity to enforce their pat-
ent rights, and maintain equity in the business used to com-
mercialise the work; all sorts of behaviors work to seek expul-
sion of new-market entrants, competitors; through means,
which is financial in nature, and corrupt, oftentimes, to the
core.
Commonly (with special consideration for large multi-
nationals);
Internal legal department are established; designed to provide
measurable economic benefit for companies through inter-
nally developed strategies in how to deal with Intellectual
Property related matters. Sometimes extended by depart-
ments of “strategic marketing”.
The purpose of these business units generally, is to exploit in-
tellectual property not on a basis of law; but the capacity for
law-enforcement, and the potential costs attributed to a strat-
egy incorporating said mechanisms.
Lawyers work on the basis of “Risk mitigation”, understand-
ing that a certain percentage of people who’ve had their rights
exploited will not have the capacity to enforce their rights. For
those who do, only a very small percentage, will result in a
damages claim being successfully delivered. The unfair use of
the work, may take a few months to commercialise globally, as
a product; but a court-case, and damages outcome, years. In
that time, will the outcome exceeds the benefit generated by
the company, by exploiting the Intellectual property in the
first instance? What is the value to the company, for exploit-
ing that work and preventing, or making uneconomical, the
start-up and development of the company where the intellec-
tual property originated; what are the flow-on benefits for
market positioning, related products and commercial advan-
tage for the company, and its shareholders.
v
Having specialised in the production of what is broadly
termed “ideas” (being that an idea, is unprotect-able, a com-
mercially advantageous term to use); this type of strategy has
been found to be so widespread, it can be counted on, as a
form of standard practice.
If offended by it; one must consider that these types of com-
mercial strategies more readily destroy peoples lives than of-
fer betterment, even when successful. A form of control, un-
thought of and poorly considered to the broad extent of dam-
age it causes.
To test this market mechanism, an experiment can easily be
facilitated.
Find an idea, which you know is valuable. Spend some time
developing it, the create a “marketing release” strategy.
Continue to develop the work; but release part of the idea to
the largest national company. Work with them, as they at-
tempt to rationalise the idea internally.
This should take between 3-6 months.
Once this process is done, the likely outcome is that they’ll
close the door - suggesting the opportunity doesn’t fit, for one
reason or another.
Throughout this process; persuant to the experiment, ensure
you’ve continued to develop the ‘idea’, relationships, documen-
tation, etc. Find the biggest person in the world, a director or
executive of the largest company in that field. Give them the
work. Work with them, in how they implement it.
The result; should be that both companies develop the work.
the local “leader”, spending perhaps a few million on develop-
ment; whilst the international leader,
Has greater market share. Greater capacity to distribute and
engage potential users.
The most probable outcome, is that the bigger party; will suc-
ceed in delivering the project; the others, having been lever-
aged through poor behavior, as bait; learn’t something about
the environment through their R&D Effort, able to get jobs
with whoever works in that organisation (brain drain); the in-
vestment turning sour able to license the commercial solution,
but the investment lost and the intellectual property from
both the inventor and the local market leader, put to waste.
Interestingly; if this strategy is used in an alliance with invest-
ment banking, then the production of a deal to fund the cost
of developing the project with an international leader my yield
5% of the total transaction value. This in-turn, being an ob-
scure way of obtaining a return; but also, a reason why a
banker may be a competitor; rather than a trusted advisor or
partner.
Overall; this experiment can be easily replicated by people de-
veloping useful things, in their homes and sheds. The prob-
lem, it examples, is that of plutocracy and the unenforceability
in a democracy; of law, as it should apply to all entities.
vi
In my case, the results brought about the belief that the sys-
tem is broken. That there is a major problem with confidence,
in the legitimate use of information. Intellectual property law
is not, as it was designed to do, capable of protecting the inter-
ests of “inventors” free of market discrimination. In-turn, this
reduces the value, on a sliding scale, of all information based
assets to zero, overtime. This manifestation of activity is con-
trary to the interests of society, democractic principle and the
economic platform used, to support socio-environmental,
“free market” mechanisms. The concept of Freedom directly
relates to freedom from persecution, and human rights as a
set of common-values used to encourage trade, communica-
tions and development of all things.
Works by the people, provide the means of innovation. To
consider otherwise; is rather a method for enslaving the peo-
ple which in contemplation of the mechanisms used today;
means not to a government, but rather a corporation, a sober-
ing consideration overall.
Whilst recently, on the news a representative of a major US
Technology company attempted to argue that in terms of
trust, it was better (as an australian) to trust a US Company,
than a government; this was argued by a man paid to do so, by
a specific groups who are threatened by the idea of “fair-play”,
as the strategic marketing report would show alot of red, on
the balance sheet in the short-term.. This argument in turn;
should seems non-sensical, to a representative of any-such
firm. perhaps later, they’ll state “it was their duty”, as a per-
sonable means to justify benefit they received; knowingly ex-
ploiting others, akin to the line from the film, “the company
men”, where the lady put in charge of firing the staff says
“well, i thought i’d be able to do some good, if i didn’t do it,
someone else would”... The sociological psychology of those
best subject, to the formerly described experiment..
Whilst the work continued, The problem overtime developed.
The Global Financial Crises, showed the lack of accountability
for economic management, through advanced uses of internet
technology. Before that, the Dot-Com Crash. behavior as it has
been left, destroying environments it is responsible to protect;
without almost any consequence, save the few examples.
The completely unsustainable model of the insecure internet,
when applied to economic trade. The disunity between access
for the economically privileged or urban environments; to the
costs incurred by those living in regional areas, not only dimin-
ishing access; but moreover, the capacity to participate.
Where the greed begins, and lawless behavior is made reason-
able; corruption follows.
SAILING DIGITAL
The term “sailing digital” was first coined in 2003, the early
years of developing these concepts; overtime, it seems more
and more like the best term for applying remedy to this issue
of intellectual property exploitation.
The Sailing Digital Knowledge Platform provides something
very, very basic. The Security, of Identity and Contribution.
vii
How can this be Applied?
Well, our methods use technologies and forms of the semantic
internet. To Better describe what the Semantic Internet is: i’ll
refer you to Tim Bernard Lee.
In the following pages of this ebook; I’ll attempt to describe
the principles, the technologies, the methodologies and the ap-
plication strategy for a “knowledge banking systems”.
My current view, is that i’m hoping to establish an non-profit
organisation, capable of developing and rationalising these
ideas; testing them in the market.
Commercial Enterprises in Australia, formulated as “for
profit” companies, still require directors to consider share-
holder profits, first and foremost, with little regard for hu-
manitarian values other than in terms of economic conse-
quence and risk. It is therefore perceived that the structure,
is that of a non-profit.
It is believed that in the current market, it is best to focus on
non-profit market segments, to market-test solutions whilst
developing methodologies that knowingly have applications in
commercial markets.
The fundamental pillars of these systems are supported
through the use of “open-source” software, and international
standards and patent pools; which are now ready for use, de-
velopment and testing.
The technologies, the standards; didn’t exist in 2000. Whilst
it is understood they’ll develop, the simple fact is that to suc-
ceed in accomplishing the objective, they needed to exist.
Akin, to the delivery of this concept, in Ebook and the words
used by Steve Jobs, in the introductory video, we still have
some way to go with special regard, to accessibility.
20 years ago, Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide
Web. For his next project, he’s building a web for open,
linked data that could do for numbers what the Web did for
words, pictures, video: Unlock our data and reframe the
way we use it together. (Recorded at TED2009, February
2009 in Long Beach, California. Duration: 16:23.)
The next Web of open, linked data: Tim Berners-Lee
on TED.com
viii
CHAPTER 1
Technology
"It's in Apple's DNA that technology alone is not enough. That it's tech-
nology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that
yields us the result that makes our hearts sing."
The closing words of Steve Jobs’ in his last speech at the iPad 2 event
in March 2011
KEY ELEMENTS
1. RDF and the Semantic Web
2. Addresses: IPv6
3. WebID: Identity
4. FedoraCommons: Accounts Systems
5. Apache Solr: Search
6. Additional Components
SECTION 1
Security and IP
For the purposes of a layman and in term of digital content;
security essentially means the ability to distribute for in-
tended purpose whilst simultaneously adhering to the laws of
the land, providing a mechanism to support policy frame-
works, or permissions.
When relating the concept to data, communications or Inter-
net; Our solution provides an inclusive model, that supports
distribution for intended purpose; is inclusive in its support of
Government, for law-enforcement; whilst being provisioned
on what is generally labelled an “institutional model”; where a
trusted institution, subject to law, provides accounts to users.
Further to these more functional aspects; our systems are dif-
ferent to most others, because the methodologies start at a
very low-level or functional basis; right through to the sharing
elements of how distribution is made possible, and upon what
basis. Beyond that, its done using opensource tools. The or-
ganisation is set-up in a way - that means we support “trust”
as a primary directive; and, that if you do not like the way
things are being provided; you, the user, can move it else-
where.
Vinton Cerf is a pioneer of the Internet, having been integrally
involved in the development of Internet Protocol and the
data-communications layer technologies involved with basic
internet services. In this video, he talks of some of the heri-
tage relating to the internet and the Introduction of IPv6
10
Uploaded (to youtube) on 6 Jul 2011
Google's Vint Cerf discusses how Internet Protocol (IP) de-
veloped.

http://thenetwork.cisco.com
Network Trailblazers: Vint Cerf on IPv6
By: Cisco
KEY CHARACTERISTICS
RDF is used to describe relationships
The Semantic Internet uses specific technologies,
which have been developed and defined.
Objects and Assets obtain unique resource
locations or unique digital identities.
CHAPTER 1
Semantic Web - RDF
The Building Blocks used for the creation of the Sailing Digi-
tal, Knowledge banking platform, is based upon technologies
and tools for the semantic web. These technologies are stan-
dards, available freely for use.
Through the application of specific standards an array of bene-
fits are achieved; From the use of specific standards that en-
sure data can be portable; along with the ability to develop a
market-program, where although specified works are to be de-
veloped by a specific firm; the technologies are not proprie-
tary in nature, assisting with uptake, accessibility and data-
portability.
11
Published on 22 Apr 2011
Find out what the Semantic Web is all about and how it
might be structured. How can we make computers smarter
so we can get the information we need in context? 



From the online Web Services class offered by Computer
Careers at South Central College located in North Mankato,
MN 56003 USA. http://cc.SouthCentral.edu
The Semantic Web - An Overview
By: Peter WebExplorations
KEY CHARACTERISTICS
More IP Addresses than Grains of Sand on the
Planet
Integrated Security
CHAPTER 1
IPv6
IPv6 is an important building block for the future of internet,
for several reasons.
1. The existing IPv4 version of the internet, does not have
enough addresses to service the internet user base or audi-
ence.
Without an Internet Protocol Address - users are simply un-
able to connect.
IPv6 provides more potential unique addresses, than there are
grains of sand on the planet. In-turn, this potentially means
that almost everything; can be provided a unique identity.
2. The address itself, also provides a means to deliver commu-
nications security; in ways that were not available in the
past.
IPv6 has integrated security layers, which enables the encryp-
tion of data between any two identified points. The implica-
tion of this, is that a transaction between two parties can be
secured between those two parties.
This in-turn relates to Identity Systems. In-order to support
users and knowledge banking systems; identity systems need
to take into account both the concept of the device; in addition
to the concept of the identity, the person; or perhaps more
meaningfully also, the specific asset and the associations be-
tween the asset, and its legal entitlements overall.
To do this, we use both IPv6 and FOAF+SSL as an identity
platform foundation.
12
Published on 13 Dec 2012
Confused about IPv6? This video from DrayTek help to ex-
plain what it is, how it can benefit us in the future and the
difference between IPv6 and IPv4.
What is IPv6?
By: BroadbandBuyer.co.uk
CHAPTER 1
Identity
IDENTITY
Identity is fundamental to existence. The foundation to recog-
nition, identity provides the means to contribute to a society.
Similarly to physical identity objects; digital identity is needed
to provide service offering, interactions by people on a basis of
requirement; to provide integrity for participants who seek to
be recognised in any economy, including the digital economy.
Identity and dignity virtuously linked, through the application
of “permissions systems”. Identity is more than simply recog-
nition of existence, but also of choice. The systems, in-turn
are designed to enable users to address situations and easily
respond to requests, which in-turn related to legal concepts.
All other “layers” are built upon this concept, of identity; in-
cluding but not exclusive to copyright, proprietary ownership,
authorship, license, sublicense and other intellectual property
related laws and practices.
To achieve this outcome, we’re developing systems that use
WebID or FOAF+SSL.
These frameworks, provide means for authentication and inte-
gration of authentication methodologies with IPv6, subject to
appropriate integration with a platform that is able to make
this association to both the identity system, as well as the as-
set or object registry associated to that identity.
The focal point of our identity system is to provide the capac-
ity and the opportunity for individuals to create a secure iden-
13
By: Henry Story
“The current Social Networking space is a mess. We de-
scribe the problems both technical, pragmatic and philo-
sophical of current social netoworks, and present a solution
deployable immediately that works in current browsers: an
open global secure network - The Social Web.”
MOVIE 1.1 The Social Network Privacy Mess: Why we need
the Social Web
tity, where their knowledge can be stored; so that the user, is
able to use their knowledge towards its “fullest potential”.
The fully integrated Identity models, have been applied to an
an adaptive model of “knowledge banking”; as a conduit or
bridge between our traditional physical economic environ-
ments. The Identity models, enable identity orientated data-
storage models; provide mechanisms for ‘economic value’ to
be realised by participants who agree to common-economic
values or principles; allowing account holders to be attributed
to specified contribution (content); economically rationalised
as “knowledge capital”.
14
Source: http://webid.info/
MOVIE 1.2 WebID in Use
CHAPTER 1
The Account Platform
Beyond the ability to create a WebID - or an Identity; The pur-
pose of the platform, is to associate that ID, with “things”.
To do this, we’ll need to store lots of different types of data, in
a range of different formats. Fedora Commons, facilitates this
process.
The “knowledge banking” account system is an open-source
technology platform. The Combination of Fedora Commons
and WebID is to be packaged into a solution that enables
data-portability between providers.
The use of this combination of technologies, provide both port-
ability and security of accounts.
Accounts entries can be encrypted using multiple keys, or “fin-
gerprints”. The systems in-turn, providing a facility for Per-
missions to be asserted to repositories, in a way that allows a
multitude of repository owners; to share data, on a permis-
sions basis.
There are a multitude of permissions standards. Oshani is do-
ing work on this with Tim Berners Lee at MIT. Prior to this
work, TimBL also worked on a standard called PAW or Permis-
sions Aware Web. Whilst i’m not completely sure what the
situation is with his work, the understanding is that the neces-
sary work is underway, and the work involved is more about
bringing these technologies together, rather than inventing
the technologies, or ontologies themselves.
Beyond identity information and permissions systems; a criti-
cal aspect to this repository, is how data is stored for a multi-
tude of purposes.
Fedora Commons is able to store metadata, which can then be
related to assets, as related objects.
Metadata standards are available, for almost any purpose.
15
Fedora Commons is a Data-Repository, that is capable of
storing all forms of information in methods that are com-
patible with the Semantic Web Technologies.
MOVIE 1.3 Fedora Commons Overview
OPEN-SOURCE
It is envisaged that several “knowledge capital” providers will
become established; where consumers or customers of these
services, will have choices about how they intend to interact
with these services; which service providers they choose to
work with; and upon what basis. If the consumer, decides to
migrate from one account provider - to another - they can;
this is made possible technically; through the use of appropri-
ate standards, and the development methodology as to ensure
both portability and accessibility, for users.
The System will however, use an institutional methodology for
authentication to support the on-going development and sup-
port of the “web of trust”.
Web Of Trust
The Web of Trust; is a term coined by Phil Zimmermann in
1992 in the manual for PGP version 2.0:
“As time goes on, you will accumulate keys from other people
that you may want to designate as trusted introducers. Eve-
ryone else will each choose their own trusted introducers.
And everyone will gradually accumulate and distribute with
their key a collection of certifying signatures from other peo-
ple, with the expectation that anyone receiving it will trust at
least one or two of the signatures. This will cause the emer-
gence of a decentralized fault-tolerant web of confidence for
all public keys.”2
PGP is an encryption methodology; that is a technical function
providing the basis to security systems on the internet. At the
time, he published the specification in a book; to get around
US Security laws, that would have made it illegal to provide ac-
cess to this type of technology documentation outside of the
US. In simple Terms, PGP is a Digital Lock and Key method;
and whilst PGP is a specific technology, the type of encryption
is unrelated to the concept of “trust” over digital networks.
To more easily understand the concept; one could consider a
traditional financial institution, or bank.
Users, create accounts; where funds are stored, for use. These
accounts and the money held within the accounts are stored
there; under the assumption of trust with the institutional pro-
vider.
If access to the account is fraudulently made available; the in-
stitutional provider assists; in equal terms, to if access keys,
cards or related financial instruments are lost, misplaced or
assistance is required by the legitimate account holder; then,
The institutional provider is able to reissue the appropriate
key, as to reinstate access to said legitimate user of that ac-
count.
Files, data, can be encrypted using these types of methodolo-
gies, associated to the repository and the webid based authen-
tication process (incorporating encryption).
16
RDF STORE AND APACHE SOLR
1. Mulgara integrates with Fedora Commons to
provide a Semantic Data Storage Platform.
When integrated with Apache Solr, the result
is advanced search capabilities,
2. This provides a means to search the repository
and find specific data, based on metadata tags.
3. In-Turn, this allows libraries of information
to be easily searched and resourced.
SECTION 6
Search
The database platform is integrated with advanced search
technology.
Through the application of advanced metadata systems, from
the ground-up, subject to permissions records are pre-
integrated with faceted search capabilities. This key function
is integrated to the core of the platform.
This methodology, helps Application developers create inter-
faces based upon search functionality, using RDF Syntax.
The Result, is a portable, permissions based data-store that
can be applied for use by a multitude of applications, without
concern for the storage format other than, the compatibility
with RDF / XML Schemas.
17
Steve Bayliss, Senior Analyst/Developer (Acuity Unlimited)
Chris Wilper, Fedora Tech Lead (Duraspace)
RiRi 2011 - RDF, Linked Data, and the Resource Index
SECTION 7
Additional Components
Mulgara is not based on a relational database due to the
large numbers of table joins encountered by relational sys-
tems when dealing with metadata. Instead, Mulgara is a com-
pletely new database optimized for metadata management.
Mulgara models hold metadata in the form of short subject-
predicate-object statements, much like the W3C's Resource
Description Framework (RDF) standard. Metadata may be im-
ported into or exported from Mulgara in RDF.
GeoServer - an open-source server written in Java - allows
users to share, process and edit geospatial data. Using
GeoServer enables us to package, with the platform, a map-
ping engine that ensures geo-spacial data used throughout
the systems are accessible.
Video Video requirements are sophisticated, and requires a
unique solution. There are several open-source options, for
elements of the core-stack, such as Red5, an OpenSource Me-
dia Server; and Kaltura CE, an Opensource Video CMS. Per-
haps the most interesting piece of work in this area is the ava-
lon media systems platform, using the same software stack.
Video systems is perhaps one of the more commercial areas of
opportunity throughout. Few good examples exist, in how ad-
vanced Video services are provided to users, on an equitable
basis. Examples range from the basic elements of making a
youtube clip available; or, perhaps enabling video conferenc-
ing; right through to the more sophisticated examples, such as
analyzing audio to create subtitles or audio transcriptions;
video analytics, to identify people in videos; or indeed, dupli-
cate videos which need to be referred to licensing considera-
tions; or in other fields,
The ability to aggregate and search for multiple content as-
sets; then affiliate those assets, by way of an editor which en-
ables a user to create something new; without breaching li-
censing agreements; or,
Building and deploying hybridTV Packages (content, for
Broadcast / Broadband connected device Consumption)
or creating a platform that can use 3 cameras, to create a
multi-dimensional virtual holographic scene store; which
could be used to create a linear video object, with any form of
specified camera flight-path, or perhaps even render the envi-
18
KEY ELEMENTS
1. Mulgara Database
2. GeoServer
3. Video
4. EBooks and Publishing
5. Ubuntu (Debian) and Virtual Box
6. Front-End Applications
ronment into a gaming platform like space; for exploring by
users in a specified program.
The Video Segment is still rather new in terms of technology
development opportunities, strategies and methodologies.
Whilst there are certainly some very good solutions out there,
some of the important aspects; such as these systems use of
Databases, needs to be considered; in line with RDF, and our
XML Back-end processes. Herein, the Avalon Media Systems
project (and certainly, the affiliated Project Hydra) are exist-
ing pieces being developed, where an integrated program for
participatory development with these projects seems to be a
very good option. This area, will be one of growth and devel-
opment, which in-turn is expected to yield results.
EBooks and Publishing EPUB3 is an “Ebook” format that
can incorporate animation, multimedia and text as a distrib-
uted package file. Fundamentally, it is based upon the
HTML5, CSS3 set of web-page standards which in-turn, cre-
ates a method do develop and deploy applications. The specifi-
cation, includes DRM Support - meaning publications can be
encrypted and made subject to rules; which in-effect, enables
the platform owner to package objects into an application and
deliver it to users on specified terms; implementing agree-
ments with a subset of licensees to a delivered multimedia
publication.
Ubuntu / Debian are types of the linux operating system.
Ubuntu is based on Debian, and whilst larger enterprise
server environments may use debian, ubuntu is a friendly way
of packaging it. VirtualBox, is an integrated Virtual Ma-
chine, enabling the creation of a file, which incorporates appli-
cations and the operating system into a portable, download-
able object. We use VirtualBox as a way to distribute the pack-
age, and enable portability. The operating systems within the
package, is Linux based (ie: Debian / Ubuntu).
Front End Applications
The Technology Stack described, provides an advanced server
for securing and storing information in terms of assets, ob-
jects, relationships, etc.
Due to the standards orientated nature of the systems, the lan-
guages used are able to create an abstraction layer, between
the underlying principles and the outcome that is sought by
the user. To make this useful, applications need to be devel-
oped that use this functionality, as a core web-services plat-
form. The Next Chapter will discuss a range of different appli-
cations, the RDF / XML Schema’s used in those applications
and the functionality provided. All applications can provide
services to other applications. This is the design of this Seman-
tic Web, Application and Knowledge Banking Platform.
Due to the nature of the packaged environment, developers
are able to package instances of applications to suit this envi-
ronment and make applications easy to install by users. Appli-
cations may not necessarily be distributed Freely; but in all in-
stances, must use standard data-types, as to ensure a users ca-
pacity to remove any 3rd party applications and be left with
their data still in a useful state.
19
A MULTITUDE OF PLUG-INS
1. WebService Plug-ins are becoming somewhat
ubiquitous. A Multitude of service providers
offer these plugins.
2. The Ability to Use plugins; depends upon the
security of the application environment;
whether the plug-in degrades the security of
the information or otherwise.
3. Plug-ins can help enhance functionality
4. Plugins is a way Service Providers can
integrate specific applications, into
environments; which in-turn, can be easily
integrated by Application Providers.
5. The Ability for Application Providers, to make
access available off-line.
SECTION 8
Plug-Ins
/
Pixlr is an online imaging editing tool, enabling an image to
be imported on the net, edited and saved. Maqetta is an open-
source HTML5 Editing Tools, at the moment - it still looks
very technical, but the idea is there, its working, it can be de-
veloped or used the way it is. When looking at things like on-
line video editing WeVideo and VideoToolbox are just some of
the solutions out there. More advanced video analytics sys-
tems, such as transcribing Audio to text, using phonetics,
World Systems showing applications of these types speech
analysis technologies for researching the emotional responses
to specific words from call-centre environments; and whilst,
in our market it is far more important to create a method to
easily transcode the many hundreds of thousands of hours of
footage, and make it searchable; the potential applications for
these systems, when “plugged into” the knowledge banking
“cloud”; a cloud with advanced security mechanisms, is both
enormous and much safer, than the alternatives available.
This platform, does not need to reinvent everything; but
rather, provide stable foundations for others to support the de-
velopment of applications, and the growth of usage by custom-
ers. Due to the nature of the system; in that it can be down-
loaded, Perhaps interestingly; this provides a secure method
to enable the download, of otherwise online-only applications,
subject to the size of the applications. This is only made possi-
ble due to the nature of the underlying security mechanisms,
however it is important that if applications move online, their
also available for use by customers if they loose connectivity.
20
CHAPTER 2
Applications
APPLICATIONS OF IDENTITY AND ACCOUNTS
1. Authentication
2. Digital Rights Management
3. Secure Web-Data Services
4. Libraries
5. Social Networking
6. Secure Communications
7. Licensing
8. Digital Receipt, POS and E-Commerce
9. Publishing
10. Web2World Services
11. Secure Information Storage
12. Digital Economy
13. Distributed Infrastructure Management
14. Multimedia Production and Publishing
SECTION 1
Knowledge Capital
The Copyright Clause of the United States Constitution (1787)
authorised copyright legislation: "To promote the Progress of
Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to
Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective
Writings and Discoveries." That is, by guaranteeing them a pe-
riod of time in which they alone could profit from their works,
they would be enabled and encouraged to invest the time re-
quired to create them, and this would be good for society as a
whole. (REF)
More than 200 years later, this concept of intellectual contri-
butions and the rightful use of content; has evolved to become
perhaps one of the most important areas of law and economic
development; throughout the brave-new world, embodied by
the “digital economy”; a fundamental pillars of democratic
participation via the use of internet, and virtual economic de-
velopment environments. The philosophical or “higher princi-
ples” status of copyright laws, as introduced in the 1700’s on-
wards; when applied to the concept of internet and digital
economy - requires the establishing a “knowledge banking”
platform. We believe, that this is now possible; in ways only
theoretical some decade before; through the use of semantic
internet technologies for the purpose of providing accounts,
with permissions, for a myriad of content and identity serv-
ices; which in-turn interact with content assets, and trade.
As part of our development program, we will be integrating a
Permissions platform that enables the user to manage content
and permissions. These systems will have the capacity to inte-
grate with a banking gateway on the institutional providers
platform. In our model, the institutional provider, provides
services for the user, so that they are able to manage their own
permissions in how they use other services, on their terms.
One of the biggest problems this program will face, is that
“Opensource”, takes almost no account for contributors;
whereas other commercial software, generally takes owner-
ship. In this model, neither elements suit our changes, to the
copyright and intellectual property ownership model as they
do not implement means, in code, to affiliate to license.
22
“If a man empties his purse into his head no one can take it
away from him. An investment in knowledge always pays the
best interest.” Benjamin Franklin
With Regard to Licensing models; Each licensing paradigm,
have already a range of requirements.
Our Semantic Platform is able to implement those licenses,
through the application of the identity system.
Using the replication functions (ie: virtualbox) applications
can be made available offline (but will validate, upon synchro-
nization with an online source). This is important when appli-
cations are used in local areas, where internet connectivity is
of poor quality either in terms of speed, or usage qualities pur-
suant to the providers terms.
However; What it currently seems difficult to do, is to auto-
matically add applications that appear out there in the
broader environment. The reason for this is the database plat-
form.
Most open-source solutions use a MySQL Back-End (data-
base) to store all data associated to that application, including
user data. This model essentially federates the data-
repository to be owned by the application owner; rather, than
a software service - where the users, own the user-data and
the application provider, owns the application data (by de-
fault).
Existing Source-Codes can be changed to modify this situa-
tion, and in-turn make existing packages capable and compati-
ble with this knowledge platform. How this is done, is some-
thing that needs to be examined on a case-by-case basis.
Essentially, the quantum shift is in how data is distributed,
stored and used by communities. Whether those communi-
ties are formed through the common use of a business, an ap-
plication or a service; the community in-turn shares informa-
tion within the community on some form of terms, as to en-
sure the community functions.
The problem has been, that by participating with 3rd party sys-
tems, the knowledge pertaining to that community becomes
owned by the operator of the application on a semi-exclusive
basis. They are able to grant you rights, to your information.
A method, that’s made upon the inception of the introduction
to a community, where the newly formed participant may not
be fully-aware of the implications pursuant to their participa-
tion. Furthermore, the commercial rights are most often ex-
changed immediately, in return for the opportunity to partici-
pate.
This type of arrangement has proven to be unsustainable, and
whilst the necessary changes are substantially more in the
short-term, with regard for migration to an alternative meth-
odology for Knowledge Management; to that of this knowl-
edge banking process,
The change seems necessary, and an important step towards
the use of Internet Technology, for Economic Development,
Sustainability and the application of Internet for Digital Econ-
omy, in a manner consistent with the views and ideals, of a de-
mocracy.
23
HERITAGE SYSTEMS
1. On-site equipment using Apple Aperture for
images, Final Cut Pro for Video.
2. A Great Example of a Front-End, is Omeka
with NeatLines.
Key Functionality
A. The ability to store off-site, preservation copies
of assets.
B. The Ability to provide approved access to
Heritage and Educational Institutions
C. The ability to sell prints of products and/or
license of digital versions on a range of terms.
D. The ability to use declared naming systems,
providing a mechanism to give each unique
asset an identity.
E. The ability for secure-interaction with public
users to enable contributions
F. The ability to transcribe and identify duplicates
from multiple providers to enrich data-
integrity.
SECTION 2
HERITAGE
Heritage Systems actually have a range of common-
functionality with many other data-repositories.
Heritage, involves digitising assets to “preservation quality”.
Once the assets are digitised, metadata is added about the as-
sets, which in-turn provides a mechanism to search for the as-
set and relate it to purpose or knowledge.
A Test-Bed has been established in Mansfield Victoria. This
test-bed is digitising assets, to preservation quality, using
equipment driven by an Apple Mac.
IMAGES
Images, are stored using Aperture, which provides interfaces
for metadata including geographical information, and naming
people in photos.
These functions, in addition to the normal forms of metadata
entry, enable an array of advanced heritage applications.
Whilst the process, is of equal benefit to other organizations
such as publishing firms and the press; in cataloguing and
storing records, it could be suggested that in-turn, these or-
ganizations are also storing records in a heritage like format,
even if the records are new.
VHS TAPES
VHS Tapes are being digitised using a VHS, and a Black Magic
Card, with its included software. Once the VHS has been digit-
ised, it is brought into Final Cut Pro, for editing and enhance-
24
ment. Once this enhancement has been done, it is exported as
a file.
The Knowledge Banking Platform is needed to support the
storage and analysis of these records. A Similar process can be
used for both motion image, in addition to still-images.
One of the critical functions, is to identify duplicate records,
in terms of the origin asset. An asset, will have an array of me-
tadata associated to it; and rules, on how that metadata is
shared. A Video, as an example, may have a range of different
meanings for different users associated to that video asset.
In the context of a heritage institution; a News Video Clip may
have been captured and broadcast on the local or national
news in a specific year, documenting something that becomes
historically relevant. For the purpose of this example, the
original tape has been converted (even though, often-times
their gathering dust, requiring specialized aging equipment to
transcode to digital) and a Historical Society, has digitised the
same article, captured from the broadcast source (ie: freetv)
onto a VHS tape.
The Article is important to the Historical Society; as it de-
scribes something of local history, incorporating a local issue
and local people. The background knowledge associated to
that video, is often contributed towards by parties outside of
the broadcaster or the reporter involved in the broadcast tape
production at the time. There may be new information per-
taining to that broadcast, and the tape is needed to put the
story into historical perspective. However, the tape itself, is
not the property of the Historical Society.
So the Historical Society, in this example, can create the re-
cord, include the metadata and enter it into their library.
However using Online Services, the video is then matched
against the broadcasters version; and the videos are flagged.
The ability to replace the video asset is then made available,
which becomes appended to the original record of the histori-
cal society; and the commercial license terms for using that
video asset, provided back to the broadcaster with a standards
agreement used to ensure the article is still available to the his-
torical society for heritage and educational use (civic purpose)
IDENTITIES AND GENEALOGY
Genealogical research is an incredible field, with enormous
potential for clinical use in medical research, social research
and an array of other purpose.
From our trials, we’ve found the first aspect; of identifying a
specified name to a unique identity (meaning person, in this
instance) is something that needs to be considered,
Heritage research in the 1800‘s / early 1900‘s shows that peo-
ple indeed moved around, and often contributed to an array of
different geographical environments. Beyond that, family
data is then often made available from an array of different
sources and locations.
25
In-order to create a coherent collection, the best-case senario
is to create a unique identity for these people; understanding
that a virtual collection may be created; incorporating an ar-
ray of objects, from an array of different providers.
Assets would likely include legal records, to representations of
these people in photos, press articles, etc.
It is suggested that a metadata registry be created to support
the naming of individuals, for use. How this is done, is to be
explored; and the ability to assert a label, which can be up-
graded at a latter date; seems the best path in the short-term.
COLLECTIONS
Heritage Societies create collections. Collections can include
collections of local papers, A families photo collection, or an
array of articles about an important historical site; in-effect, a
curated collection on specified topic.
Rights management is needed to ensure the “sharing” of re-
cords can be equitably achieved, for civic purposes at a mini-
mum. Articles may be part of a multitude of collections.
The use of collections, is for the grouping of records.
EXHIBITS
Heritage institutions archive collections, and in-turn create ex-
hibits. An Exhibit provides narrative to a collection.
The Exhibit system needs to be easy to use, by a technical lay-
man. The systems, need to counter-reference objects and as-
sets, acquiring additional information about those records as
exhibits are created.
The purpose of an exhibit, is in essence for publishing. No-
Matter what platform the exhibit is published in, the content
should inter-relate on a fixed basis, using the knowledge-
banking back-end; to semantically derive the content, in the
order or presentation made by the curator of the exhibit.
E-Books and Publishing
The E-Book and Publishing function is designed to assist with
Revenue Creation.
Exhibits and Assets can be published, subject to the commer-
cial terms of supply. Whilst a focus on civic purpose, is inte-
grated throughout the environment (that is, for non-
commercial purpose); the ability to sell photos and images as
printed products; and the ability to publish exhibits and
books, as both published and interactive digital products is en-
visaged to provide function to the organisational process of
storing and restoring heritage collections.
Heritage Societies today, are often supported by volunteer sen-
iors from local communities who have more knowledge in
their heads about heritage, than is stored in the many filing
cabinets and boxes held throughout the heritage institutions.
26
Operationally, the civic purpose of this program is multi-
dimensional. In Australia, our education system has only re-
cently introduced a civics curricula. Whilst history has been
part of our curriculum for sometime, the resources available
to best teach local history, have been stored in these filing cabi-
nets of heritage institutions. We consider that there are sev-
eral opportunities to create community programs where stu-
dents, work with seniors at or with historical societies.
Whilst heritage is the critical path; the sociological aspects in-
volved are numerous, and advantageous for accelerating deliv-
ery of digital economic development.
Seniors often have poor digital technology literacy. In the
past, this could be best summarized as poor computer skills,
but the reality today, is that it is not simply a desktop com-
puter; but moreover, telephones, internet devices, communica-
tion requirements - like email; and the ability to receive com-
munity information on advanced consumer electronics like
TV’s, Blu-Ray Players, etc.
Combined with the lack of education or functional knowledge;
are the potential health benefits, on a social level; in affiliation
to mental and physical well-being.
The stress caused when seniors are forced to interact with cor-
porations who demand the use of digital technology, is signifi-
cant. The benefit for seniors with health problems, such as
poor-eyesight - being able to consumer knowledge, through
text-to-audio functions, is also significant; and this is just one
example.
In terms of Aged Care; Technology has the capacity to provide
video conferencing, or remote tele-medicine.
These functions go beyond the pure-purpose of heritage, or
seniors - in remote and regional areas, the ability for clinical
specialists to get involved with healthcare, subject to accessi-
bility to technology and available information; may offer re-
markable opportunities to health-care generally.
When it comes to how seniors learn technology, they are inter-
ested in seeing their children and grandchildren, but their not
very interested in Facebook. Skype, is well accepted.
They’ve got interests in the news, in holidays - going places,
seeing things; but currently, they’ll use a telephone or perhaps
email. They’ll buy the paper.
A book is good, but they often don’t know about text-to-audio
functions of e-books.
Computers are frightening; but they’ve never really consid-
ered something like an ipad. It’s expensive, and it doesn’t
have a keyboard; but they’ve never really tried to touch-
interface, nor the applications that live on the device. They
didn’t really like mobile phones either, but now - they’ve got
simple ones.
By Supporting the production of digital heritage libraries, the
interactive effect; is that the program is also supporting the de-
velopment of digital literacy skills, by seniors, whilst simulta-
neously (through this strategy) protecting their information.
27
SOCIAL APPLICATION FRAMEWORKS
1. All Users need to have an Account
2. Applications are managed by Non-Profits
3. Application Providers must both Publish their
own works; in addition to supporting
community engagement in some way.
4. Access and interactions with community must
be based on specified purpose.
5. Development programs may be supported by
commercial businesses
6. The Business Models can apply memberships
and premium access environments.
7. Participants are in control of permissions.
SECTION 3
SOCIAL
We’re currently developing a few key social programs, two are
based upon social-networking methods; the other, based on a
membership program, which in-turn provides a mechanism to
consider how clubs might use these systems.
SOCIAL NETWORK PLATFORMS
Tourist
Tourist is an application designed for travellers, and tourism
service providers.
The Tourist program, has two key interfaces; one for suppliers
or businesses seeking to provide services to tourists, the other
for tourists to find, discover and plan a trip.
From the Tourists perspective; their able to search and find a
place they want to goto.
As a tourist, they’ll be interested to find both places their able
to stay (accommodation); as well as resourcing local activities
and perhaps tourist services, such as vehicle hire, translators
or tour-guides and other assorted services.
Tourist Example 1
Say for example; a bunch of uni-students, want to go out to
the country for a few days. They’d like to go ride a horse for a
few days, perhaps - go fishing, and go canoeing down the
howqua river. Their objective, is an adventure holiday.
28
So, in that case; their able to use a mapping system, to track-
out where they’d like to hike. In-Turn, this can associate to
the local parks governance (parks vic, for example) to notify
them that there’s a bunch of city people, hiking through the
forest. So, if there’s a fire - they know where they might find
them.
There’s a hut in the middle of their trek, it seems sensible to
see if it’s available; and it is!! they’ll need to get the keys, and
pay for the accommodation.
They don’t have horses, and really don’t know much about
them. The service is available, costs a few hundred each.
They’ll book that, send them the proposed trek, and seek feed-
back and/or confirmation. Charlie, the local horse tour guy,
receives the message - but doesn’t think the trek path is best;
so he suggests an alternative route, using his local knowledge.
The uni-kids receive this, and agree that its best to go with the
local knowledge.
The hut has a river in front of it. Good place to learn how to
fly-fish.
They send the place, and the request - with the number of peo-
ple, to the business that provides fly-fishing.
They answer a bunch of questions - do they want to buy the
equipment or hire it, how long do they want some help? etc.
The fishing tour guy, sends back a response - all good, per-
haps a different place (better for catching trout) - again, the
students agree. it all fits in.
They’ll need some food, could take it with them: but it can be
delivered to the hut, if they like. They connect with the local
IGA site, make arrangements, all sorted.
Their not sure if they’ve got insurance; they’ve heard about
people breaking legs, or whatever, needing a helicopter -
happy to be alive, with a huge debt; luckily, there’s an option
for that too. Some get it, some don’t, all good.
The web looks at the trip; and notifies them that there’s no mo-
bile coverage. An offer is available from the local tourism cen-
tre, to loan a satellite tracking device; with an emergency func-
tion. they decide that’s a good idea too.
Their able to split the cost per head; Money’s paid; and, they
can print out their itinerary.
In the last minute, a friend from interstate wants to come
along; they can send them a link, all the suppliers get a notifi-
cation - 1 more? yes/no - all say yes - their mate, pays the addi-
tional - all sorted.
They get there, pick-up the bits and pieces from the local infor-
mation centre (tourism centre) and have a great holiday.
They get back, the expedition, with photos (if they like) can be
posted to their accounts, shared - with Facebook and recom-
mended to others.
29
Summary:
In this example, the students were not-only able to resource
the small business operators for the special needs they had, in
seeking their holiday; and, make bookings for not just the ac-
commodation, but also the services relating to their holiday,
which helped make the experience a success. Because they
were out in forest, they were also able to notify the local
authorities, to ensure that if anything went wrong, they could
be found. They were also able to engage locals, to resource all
the bits and pieces they wanted to ensure their holiday went
smoothly.
TOURIST EXAMPLE 2
An Overseas Couple, have heard so much about Australia that
they’ve decided to go on a holiday to find out about the place.
They only speak arabic well, they do speak a bit of english; but
are not confident about their skills. They’d prefer to have
someone come with them, to act as a tour-guide.
They’d like a bit of adventure. money’s not really the prob-
lem, they’re more interested in the experience.
So,
They’d like to find a house or apartment; with a BBQ. Their
flying in to Melbourne, and they’d like to drive a Holden HSV.
They’d like to go somewhere they can go into the bush, but
they’d also like to spend sometime on the water, water-skiing.
They’d buy a boat, but would prefer not to. similarly they’d
buy the car, but would prefer not to.
They’d prefer not to get ripped off, and feel that in their over-
seas trips to european places, they’ve often been treated
poorly because of their race and anthropological background.
Always looking at investments; life is more about making a
positive contribution, than it is about making a profit and ex-
ploiting others. They do a search; find that there is a lake,
called Eildon and near it, the alpine alps. they would like to
make a holiday.
Their trip, will include some business in Sydney, and Can-
berra - but they don’t like the city.
OUTCOME
The system can then go find a HSV to hire, find an apartment
that suits their needs; make arrangements for helicopters, and
transport for a boat that will be hired; the authorities notified,
to obtain license requirements for using the equipment.
A Tour-Guide is found; accommodation booked from them
also, nearby, with a services contract to support their needs
throughout their stay.
Whilst not going into the details, the overview is that all their
needs can be catered for; through this market-place based ap-
30
plication. In simple terms; it’s designed to be more than sim-
ply an accommodation booking site; and more of a tourism
site.
MERCHANT INTERFACE
Merchants on this system, are all sorts of providers. From ac-
commodation, to hire companies, tour-guides, caterers, adven-
ture experience providers etc.
These providers are able to offer services and track their calen-
dars, to ensure they’re not booked to provide services to more
than one party simultaneously. Their in-effect contracted to
provide those services based on mutual agreement. They’re
not obligated to accept a job, until they’ve actually accepted it
in the system. Their able to discuss things with potential cus-
tomers, and help to improve the offer and the experience had;
but the proposed customers.
ECONOMIC OUTCOME
For all tourists, but especially interstate of state based travel
to small townships, it is difficult to identify the relevant serv-
ice providers affiliated to that area. Questions, such as where
the best restaurants are, how can i go horse riding or go
water-skiing are often both difficult to find from a customers
perspective; as well as from a suppliers perspective; often diffi-
cult to supply, in many cases with regard to insurance require-
ments. It is envisaged that this application will assist in em-
ployment and economic development of regional areas espe-
cially.
ACTIVITY AND SOCIAL HEALTH APPLICATION
Working with Life Be In It; an application concept has come-
about, where sporting and social events can be advertised on a
common-social platform; enabling consumers to search and
find activities they’d like to participate in; resourcing the loca-
tion of the event, and the necessary information needed to par-
ticipate (including costs, etc.).
The system is very similar in function to the Tourist system; in
that it connects suppliers to people, in a social-network orien-
tated way.
The Secondary aspect to the program; is that in this instance,
the ability to provide results or certifications for participation
by the event organiser, back to the participants account; is en-
abled.
This means in-turn, that the user is able to advertise on Face-
book or otherwise, their involved in running, sailing, golf of
charitable events; and add this participatory information, to
their social-profile.
Similarly to the tourism site; participation in many sporting
clubs often needs memberships and insurances. This sort of
thing could be handled by this system, for temporary or guest
club attendees, to avert potential harm from any club offering
the opportunity to participate; for would-be new-members or
participants; prior to their payment of membership, should it
be required for on-going participation with the club.
31
CLUB WEBSITES
A Club has recently approached us to develop a site, which
demonstrates their club; and hopefully, provides a means for
the club to get revenue. In this case, it’s a players association;
where the club raises money to support former professional
players, should they run into trouble later in life; as well as,
providing community services after the days of their profes-
sional careers end.
The Club had the right to sell images and other materials from
the club, as printed products.
In Essence; the club is treated much like a historical society;
with an array of assets, which it can provide users, who seem
public access or membership.
The Website created; helps the club by creating membership
identities for members of the site; which enables them to use
that membership at other outlets where the membership is
meaningful. In addition to this function, their also able to sell
printed products to the public, to help raise funds for the mem-
bership club, and its purpose.
BROADER SCOPE
Clubs or incorporated associations, support an array of sport-
ing groups and their activities. Most clubs, have an array of
services they offer - whether it be facilitating sporting activi-
ties, social or other civic purpose; clubs, provide both commu-
nity support, in addition to collecting heritage assets of value
to the community.
Clubs have Membership systems; these membership systems
can be integrated with the Knowledge banking system, to cre-
ate membership identities.
It is envisaged that the potential scope of use for clubs, with
this platform, is substantial.
The permissions based social-web functions of the underlying
systems and processes, enable club-membership to be shared
with identity; as it is in real-life both for the people involved
with the club.
Some clubs have problems when it comes to corruption, al-
though these clubs are more-often called “gangs”.
The use of this platform may assist in governance, and sup-
port for clubs for the operation of their club for legitimate pur-
pose.
Another aspect this system will likely be capable of support-
ing, is a donations system; in association to the retail POS plat-
forms. Whilst the full-scope of opportunities for the applica-
tion of these systems for clubs has not been fully explored; the
area is expected to be an opportunity for applying the pro-
gram of work, to civic purpose; whilst facilitating a mecha-
nism that can provide “proof of concept” and “pre-sales” activi-
ties to commercial entities who may later wish to make other
applications that are more commercially geared.
32
E-COMMERCE FOR SMALL BUSINESS
1. A Digital Receipt System integrated into
Computer based POS
2. An E-Commerce Solution
A. Ability to Synchronize POS Information
B. Ability to create Loyalty Programs
C. Ability to Participate with Supplier Loyalty
Programs
3. Shipping Support Systems
4. Banking Gateways Assistance
5. Web to Physical (EG:Print, Post)
6. Data analytics
CHAPTER 2
Small Business
Small Business E-Commerce

The underlying technologies are an XML Schema for Point of
Sale, which is then integrated via Microsoft Software, into spe-
cific Point of Sale Software Solutions.
This software is distributed with a hardware based NFC (Near
Field Communications) reader; which is used at the point of
sale, in association to Financial Transactions.
If both parties have E-Commerce enabled in their profiles;
this can be facilitated online, with the NFC Reader.
The Customer side; uses a digital receipt standard, to capture
information relating to a transaction, which is then posted to
their knowledge bank. Through this process, a relationship is
created between the user, and the business.
The user is able to log-into their knowledge bank, and set per-
missions around whether they’d like to receive marketing ma-
terials from that supplier; and otherwise, whether they’d like
to maintain a relationship in anyway with the supplier, be-
yond receiving the digital receipt.
The end-user (customer) is also able to set-permissions for
specific brands or suppliers; a brand may run a campaign,
that says “if you buy 15 bottles of “Mountain Water” within 2
weeks (As an example), you’ll receive the next one free”, the
retailer reimbursed by the supplier - using the digital receipt
system to track sales. Similarly; a store may have a “local re-
wards” program, discounting services to locals.
33
The other key function, is the ability for product sellers; to cre-
ate an online shop, with relative ease, and for that shop to
share information with the Point of Sale System.
As an example;
A tourist visits an antique shop, and is very interested in a
piece of furniture; but has no intention of purchasing, and
shipping it immediately., perhaps, they’d prefer to spend that
weeks salary on the holiday...
They get home, still haven’t forgotten about the furniture
item.
The customer, asked the shop-owner to send them a link. The
shop owner did so, using the NFC Chip - so the customer
didn’t need to give the shop their personal details.
The customer goes into their records, finds the object; it’s still
there, so they decide to buy it and have it shipped.
The shop, in their system; have a specific shipping agent they
prefer to use, their son (perhaps). The price, including deliv-
ery, is organised, and delivery is arranged.
The parties can agree on being paid up-front, or part up-front,
and part upon delivery. Upon delivery, the shop-clerk, uses
their NFC Reader, with the customers NFC Card - to confirm
delivery and finalise the order; the customer does so, acknowl-
edging the product is as expected; and the deal is done.
Many Small Businesses make the transition to a smart point
of sale device; namely due to the benefits in accounting sys-
tems, stock management and the capacity to provide some-
sort of membership program.
However the reality is that not many people want a member-
ship card from every shop, on their person.
Beyond the membership problem; the e-commerce problem,
is also rather substantial. Many small business operators can
set-up a Point of Sale Machine.
But Setting up a website, with e-commerce is somewhat more
difficult.
The idea of this application; is to make it easier.
The key elements needed within the Knowledge Banking Sys-
tem, is the capacity to provide these types of services; rather
than being the sole operator of these types of services.
Using the Semantic RDF Architecture, naming conventions
are standardised.
This in-turn offers opportunities to application developers, to
make better systems; that work on common principles.
The purpose of this project, is to demonstrate and create a
proof of concept. Whilst we can certainly deliver this pro-
gram; it may be deemed better, to assist the market in adapt-
ing their programs, to work with our systems, working as a
partner rather than as a competitor.
34
CHAPTER 3
Technology
Fund
A Non-Profit Funding Mechanism that’s
created an funded through the use of the
platform for financial transactional pur-
poses.
A percentage of these revenues go to-
wards the distribution of technology and
training programs for civic purpose.
The First agenda item for the technology
Fund, will be the creation and distribu-
tion of Heritage solutions for civic and
educational use, to smaller heritage insti-
tutions who are the leaders of heritage
management in shires; could not other-
wise fund the cost without external sup-
port.
CHAPTER 4
The ACLA Association
The Business is to be established as a
Non-Profit Association.
The business name is to be the Liberal
Arts Association Inc.
This Association will own a second busi-
ness name being “the Australian Centre
for Liberal Arts”.
The Website will be: ACLA.org.au
THE ACLA THE LIBERAL ARTS ASSOCIATION
The Definition of Liberal arts education From Wikipedia
The seven liberal arts – Picture from the Hortus deliciarum of Herrad von Landsberg
(12th century)
The liberal arts (Latin: artes liberales) are those subjects or skills that in classical antiq-
uity were considered essential for a free person (a citizen) to know in order to take an ac-
tive part in civic life. In Ancient Greece this included participating in public debate, de-
fending oneself in court, serving on juries, and most importantly, military service (slaves
and resident aliens were by definition excluded from the duties and responsibilities of citi-
zenship). The aim of these studies was to produce a virtuous, knowledgeable, and articu-
late person. Grammar, rhetoric, and logic were the core liberal arts. During medieval
times, when learning came under the purview of the Church, these subjects (called the
Trivium) were extended to include arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy (which
included the study of astrology). This extended curriculum was called the Quadrivium. To-
gether the Trivium and Quadrivium constituted the seven liberal arts of the medieval uni-
versity curriculum. In the Renaissance, the Italian humanists, who in many respects con-
tinued the grammatical and rhetorical traditions of the Middle Ages, rechristened the old
Trivium with a new and more ambitious name: Studia humanitatis, and also increased its
scope. They excluded logic and added to the traditional Latin grammar and rhetoric not
only history, Greek, and moral philosophy (ethics), but made poetry, once a sequel of
grammar and rhetoric, the most important member of the whole group.[1] The educa-
tional curriculum of humanism spread throughout Europe during the sixteenth century
and became the educational foundation for the schooling of European elites, the function-
aries of political administration, the clergy of the various legally recognized churches, and
the learned professions of law and medicine.[2]The ideal of a liberal arts, or humanistic education grounded in classical languages and literature, persisted un-
til the middle of the twentieth century.
In modern times liberal arts is a term which can be interpreted in different ways. It can refer to certain areas of literature,languages, philosophy, history,
mathematics, psychology, and science.[3] It can also refer to studies on a liberal arts degree program. For example, Harvard University offers a Master of Lib-
eral Arts degree, which covers biological and social sciences as well as the humanities.[4] For both interpretations, the term generally refers to matters not re-
lating to theprofessional, vocational, or technical curricula. Arguably,[weasel words][who?][original research?] liberal professions, so-called[weasel words]
"learned professions"[citation needed], include only professions which require education at the university: medicine, for example, as well as law and architec-
ture—heirs of the Trivium and theQuadrivium.[original research?]
ASSOCIATION FOCUS
1. Build Systems for Civic Purpose
2. Apply Technology Opportunities for the Public
Good.
3. Uphold the Principles of Democracy and
Human Rights
4. Be Inclusive in how Solutions are made
available to others. Do not discriminate against
others without judicial purpose.
5. Support and develop solutions for the growth
of prosperous economic outcomes
6. Uphold the rights of the account holders. The
information stored by us, is in trust, our
purpose is to assist them in their use of that
information as a Knowledge Banking Provider.
SECTION 1
Membership
The Organization being established is a Non-Profit Organiza-
tion, for the specific purpose of ensuring any and all board or
committee decisions are focused on the public good, rather
than profit generating opportunities for shareholders.
We are a Membership based association with support for pub-
lic access, where applicable.
MEMBERSHIP TYPES
1. NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION (CLASS HERITAGE)
The Heritage Class of Membership is designed to heritage in-
stitutions. This class of membership, allows us to manage our
heritage organizations more specifically; supporting their spe-
cial needs.
1. NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION (CLASS CLUB)
Same as above, but for clubs. Clubs, are more-likely to have
different “loyalty” affiliations and whilst their service may in-
clude heritage; the primary purpose, will more likely be tar-
geted at engagement for activities.
2. NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION (CLASS EDUCATION)
Same as above, but for Education Service Providers. Educa-
tion has special needs with consideration for access by stu-
dents, and how we support their needs and the needs of educa-
tional providers. Education facilities, need services that inter-
act with the enterprise nature of their platforms. Beyond this,
38
there are also opportunities pursuant to the reuse and remix-
ing of content, for use in school-based work.
The Systems are capable of assigning different license types.
It seems to be the most practical way, that schools actually
manage the “knowledge banking” information of students, in
affiliation to parents.
We have an interest in supporting the “life long learning” para-
digm. Exploring ways this can be done, will be an interesting
endeavor. With regard for the Educational Programs needed
to improve the skills of seniors with computing technologies;
as well as the many other inferred areas of knowledge; it is
hoped that the delivery of these programs of education, can be
done with the support or perhaps; collaboration, of adult edu-
cation institutions who are able to provide a more meaningful,
local support facility; enabling our association to focus more
on professional development, rather than end-user training
directly.
Many of the systems being developed originate from Universi-
ties in the United States, and elsewhere. It is hoped that the
organisation will form partnerships with Universities to con-
tinue this good work locally.
3.SMALL BUSINESS
Small businesses have different needs than clubs and non-
profits. Notably; the economics surrounding a small business,
is that we hope to assist the organization in becoming a big-
business.
The Membership types will be split, on the basis of those who
contribute back into the community; and those who don’t.
4.PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Professional Services are for developers and contributors of
the projects; and critical individuals and organisations who as-
sist in the production, support and development of solutions
vended by the ACLA.
Most of our membership classes will be based on jurisdic-
tional law; which in australia means, In Australia - not over-
seas. One of the Exceptions will be the Professional Services
Membership type.
The Reason for this; is that contributors to this platform will
likely be based all over the globe. The best, of the Best, are
not necessarily in Australia. Whilst it would be great to see
them living happily in Mansfield Victoria; the reality is hope-
fully much better, in that our work here in Australia; can be
provided conduits for setting-up similar systems overseas.
5.CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP
Corporate Memberships are treated differently, as to ensure
the corporate interest does not override the interests of the as-
sociations charter; or, the members.
39
A Corporate Membership is highly priced. It is designed to ac-
knowledge support; where support is given for our good work,
without undue interferences. We are hoping that Corporate
Sponsorships will support the Development of our technolo-
gies. Specialised licensing agreements can certainly be
drafted on the basis of considered membership agreements.
Corporate Members hold a vote; no greater than the weight
cast on the vote of any other member.
6.HONORARY MEMBERS
Honorary Memberships are given to those who’ve provided
outstanding levels of support to the organisation, its purpose
and / or alternatively; towards its charter as an independent
entity. These Memberships are subject to approval by the
committee.
MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS
Members, subject to the terms of membership; are entitled to,
1. Information and participation in defining and supporting
our works;
2. Discounts on Supply of equipment and services made avail-
able by our Association
3. Loan Equipment and/or support for Production and other
Professional Services.
4. Support Services for Digitization of Specialized products,
On-Site Technology, and Training.
5. Invitations to Events, Meetings and other related services.
PURPOSE OF STRUCTURE & MEMBERSHIPS
Publicly Listed Commercial Organisations are governed by the
vote of the shareholders. However the directors of these or-
ganisations are also required to ensure their actions are more
specifically focused upon the development of profits for the
shareholders.
This organisation is not profits centric; as a primary directive.
Whilst economic sustainability and growth is certainly well
within the parameters of the organisations charter; the over-
riding cause, is that of public good and competent philan-
thropy. As a means of organisational security, the principle
concept is to use Membership, or the principles of democracy,
to drive the organisation and its activities,
Whilst we seek the best; our organisation will be focused upon
growth of the organisation in a manner that is transparent, as
best can be done, to the members; and that the focus of the or-
ganisation is always put back to the interests of the members,
in complying with the charter and how that is facilitated.
A System of “voting” will be established when practical, that
will enable digital voting on strategic queries. Whilst the com-
mittee may be at liberty to ignore the results of the outcomes,
key areas will need to be put to vote at members committee
meetings; events, where all parties are able to participate.
Throughout our start-up sequence, which will be evaluated as
less than 1m turn-over, the organisation will develop the full
procedural processes for management and the establishment
of policies pursuant to the voting program of governance.
40
TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW
1. We Build
2. We Test
3. We Develop a Centre of Excellence
4. We Support NFP organisations
5. We Protect the interests of our Account
Holders.
SECTION 2
Technology
TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT
We will orchestrate the development of Open-Source Technol-
ogy solutions, in-order to ensure the platform itself, does not
produce a lock-in environment for users; and, to lower the
cost of development overall. The most significant counterpart
to this body of work; is in the orchestration of people. The so-
ciological aspects in how to form a collaborative environment
where contributors work towards a common-goal, and are re-
warded for contributing to the work. The critical building
block, is the core Knowledge Banking Platform; with its ancil-
lary applications - market release products - specified in this
document. These deployment models (applications) will be
developed in a way that can be easily styled for use by Account
Holders & Historical Societies, Clubs and Small Business Op-
erators. The Tourism and Club Event Applications are ex-
pected to drive most of the growth-revenues in the short-
term.
TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS
With regard to the technology solutions we provide, our focus
will be in supporting the Non-Profit Sector. Where we engage
in projects that are more commercial in nature, our invest-
ments are channeled into the support of non-profit works
and/or projects that have a civic purpose agenda.
Research has shown that there are marked benefits in assist-
ing with the distribution of hardware solutions for the non-
profit market. Most non-profits are not tech-savvy. Licensing
mechanisms especially, are difficult without significant exper-
41
Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNXW1lHXQ7s
Sean Parker discussing the Future of the Social Web
tise in the area. Costs for properly licensing non-profit ver-
sions of software change, remarkably the cost of deployment.
without this support, it is suggested that for many access to
equipment will be out of reach for many organisations in Aus-
tralia.
Some of the more operational components of the technologies
we develop; can provide other benefits to organisations; in-
cluding the ability for nominated others; to provide remote
support. This is a difficult area of service provision; as often,
providing support can extend onerously. Where individuals
who are not really interested in learning, decide rather - to
make it someone else problem; things provided with good-
intentions, can actually be made uneconomically viable.
The Education unit of the business, will be looking at ways to
create strategies, proceedures and opportunities to make sus-
tainable business practices in a manner that can effectively
support new users. From a technology position; the idea, is to
make these systems as user-friendly as possible.
The Back-end systems to the knowledge bank, do provide
version-control functions. This in-turn, enables things to be
“undeleted” (for example).
In-order to make the transition to digital technology and digi-
tal economic relevance available; it seems that supply of tech-
nology will be a counterpart to the associations works.
ONLINE INFRASTRUCTURE

Throughout the Due-Diligence Phase, several infrastructure
technologies have been identified as necessary components to
the broader platform; the cost of single units, outside of scope
for smaller organizations.
Some of these types of services are simple; such as setting-up
hosting environments; others get more technical, such as e-
commerce functions for web-to-print, or low-cost data-back-
up of preservation materials; or even, video analysis and re-
lated services to improve records in collections, and the appli-
cation of copyright.
In Future, there are a multitude of other functions; including
but not exclusive to, a production interface, that allows users
to produce new materials, incorporating a range of 3rd party
content and related references; in a way that can be easily li-
censed by the user, or their distribution groups.
42
MEDIA LAB
1. Advanced Digitisation Capabilities
2. Creative Digital Media Studio
3. Outdoor Broadcasting Capabilities
4. Employing Students - Engaged in Community
development activities and Liberal Arts.
SECTION 3
Media Lab
DIGITISATION
When digitising heritage libraries, it’s amazing how seniors,
walk in the door talking about some historically significant as-
set they’ve got sitting on a shelf or in a box. These assets are
sometimes in professional and/or weird and wonderful for-
mats. Formats that need specialised digitisation equipment.
Formats that degrade overtime, whether or not their digitised.
To support digitisation of public records stored in formats dif-
ficult to digitize by local heritage societies and/or shires, need
a place to go to be professionally processed at low-cost.
The types of content formats include include; Broadcast
Tapes, Motion Film and Microfishe. Sometimes newspapers
are difficult to digitise also; and whilst these sorts of things
could take a very long time; it is part of the objective, by the
ACLA to figure out ways to make these processes easier to do,
achievable an indeed done, and done properly. Oftentimes
the equipment needed to digitize some particular objects is ex-
pensive and difficult to obtain and maintain. In other-cases,
equipment can be built to do the job effectively at low-cost, or
perhaps in overall in consideration of “Total Cost of Owner-
ship” (“TCO”).
Beyond the more mechanical aspects; the requirements in
terms of skills, in how to process these assets oftentimes also
needs expertise. As the Centre, is established, it is suggested
that the equipment needed to digitise these types of objects to
preservation quality be included in the overall scope of work.
43
Mansfield Media Lab: by Tim Holborn - Uploaded on the
3rd may 2011 The Mansfield Media Lab is an important
part of the Research Process undertaken developing the
ACLA Plan.
MEDIA PRODUCTION
Heritage
The Equipment needed for digitization is essentially produc-
tion equipment. The better the production equipment, the
more than can be done with historical records. In-terms of
processing content; the job can be considered to be a nebulous
task; “how long is a piece of string”, with regard to the process-
ing mechanisms for restoring old footage.
With presevation in mind; the most important part is the ac-
quisition process; however, one this has been achieved, being
able to get the buzz out of audio, or the cracks out of broken
photos - is all part of the broader view, of preservation and Me-
dia Production Skills. Working with historical societies, it is
often the case that the operator says there is a somebody in
town who knows more about that photo. The volunteer, then
arranges to go speak to them about the asset, because they’ll
know. Ideally, these types of events could be recorded; there
could be a place, where interviews could be done; to record
some of this information in peoples heads; make it available
for later interpretation. Beyond the Heritage purposes; there
are an array of other purposes, both of civic nature; and of
community benefit.
Local Media Production
In the not-too-distant future, multi-media will be used much
more readily as a news and communications format. The dis-
tribution of this “ebook” is designed to demonstrate that con-
cept.
In a related; earlier project (an investment); I developed the
ideas surrounding this project, through supporting a “thing”
called “AusCivics”, in conjunction with another related project
“The Mansfield ArmChair Cinema”.
The Mansfield Armchair Cinema, is a community funded pro-
ject; providing a Digital Cinema, to a very small town. It was
financed by the local people; employing students through a
School-Based Apprenticeship program, supported by the local
High-School.
AusCivics is a civics project, empowered with a commission
from the governor general to call upon community leaders, in
seeking to develop new methods to engage students and the
community at large, with civics education.
Through the course of supporting this work; numerous at-
tempts were made to engage schools, so many failed.
The problem, was that schools did not have as part of their
core curricula; civics education.
History, yes. English, yes. Digital Media? Sometimes. But
not Civics.
In-order to demonstrate some concepts; We developed a
short-film project, called “Without Notice”.
The Clip, available on the next page.
44
The Without Notice project, showed that students can quickly
pick-up the skills involved in producing content.
Their advanced skills with computers; makes it easy to edu-
cate those who are interested, in how to prepare, shoot and
produce content.
The project worked with students from the cinema. Their ca-
pacity to be flexible, get involved and engage their community
leaders (provided the opportunity) was demonstrated.
As the video showed; there were not only skill-based opportu-
nities provided to these students, but also notions of civic val-
ues. Demonstrations of how our system of government actu-
ally applies itself to the lives of the people.
The Experience embodied by producing Without Notice;
showed that the lack of local media, is not due to lack of inter-
ets but rather lack of capacity.
Given the opportunity, people will get involved with democ-
racy, civics and community. The problem is giving them a
voice. beyond that problem, is how to fund it.
45
The “Without Notice” Short, was shot by walking down
the street; and asking people for their time. Their time,
given freely for often a 20 minute or more interview.
This is a short to that work.
Without Notice: A Civics orientated, community engage-
ment project.
After taking Tane into the city, to interview his local politi-
cal member - I interviewed him, to document the meaning
of the experience - to him.
Interview with Tane
A “media-lab” is a multi-functional environment. It is near-
impossible to do anything with half of the necessary equip-
ment, but with all of the necessary equipment, or even 95% of
it; all sorts of things are possible.
One of the difficult things in any regional area; is creating
events and opportunities; whilst figuring out a mechanism to
do so, without making a significant loss. Music festivals, theat-
rical productions and community events all face similar is-
sues; how to ensure, the books balance.
Through the use of this equipment, these events can be cap-
tured and transmitted either live, or after the event as an ed-
ited product. This in-turn provides opportunities for new reve-
nues, whether they be gained through the application of li-
censes, premium access, sale of media or even advertising.
Many local businesses simply do not consider the idea of pro-
ducing advertising. Whilst it is most likely true, that if the
idea of producing advertising is brought into town; they’ll
most likely try to get it free, or do it themselves (until a good
reason to pay for it is understood) the first step of moving to-
wards the use of multimedia for advertising, will require a pro-
duction facility capable of providing valued services at low-
cost. Using some basic tools, a few have been created.
The Deck on High is a local restaurant. They’re advertisment,
used in the local cinema and on the internet.
46
Music Festival - James Rayne
The Deck on High Advertisement
Deck On High
Alpine Country Cottages provides accommodation.
Their advertisement is used on their website, in association to
accommodation bookings.
Whilst the shorter-term purpose of advertising stock, is rela-
tively nominal; if other services are to exist in future, that can
be funded with advertising - theses content assets will need to
exist, as a means to provide that advertising for programming,
whether it be live or pre-recorded.
Interactive TV is in the horizon. One of the core functions of
these systems, will be to enable the use of local advertising, as
part of the advertising pool used to fund programming. the
use of this pool, is expected to be far-broader than simply In-
teractive TV.
A Major Advertising Company in Australia, “Yellow Pages”,
has started already producing low-cost advertising solutions
for businesses. Yellow-Pages, is not the only organisation
looking seriously at this emerging sector.
Whilst it is reasonable to suggest that these types of “urban”
businesses will effectively service urban areas; it is question-
able as to whether they’ll be able to effectively service regional
areas.
Regional Areas have a range of limiting factors; when it comes
to growth, in relation to broadband related economic drivers.
1. Connectivity
The Connectivity issues is significant. Business models devel-
oped for urban areas, end-up causing a form of discriminatory
action in regional areas. Many regional people, can only ob-
tain internet connectivity using Mobile Telephone Networks.
These networks often have poor-coverage; and even where cov-
erage is available, the available plans offer only a few giga-
bytes per month - for a cost that in urban areas, is equivalent
to hundreds of gigs per month, for the same price.
When considering the reduced income those living in regional
areas normally face; this is simply an unfair business model,
and one that is overall unsustainable for the Australian Mar-
ket.
47
http://www.alpinecountrycottages.com.au/
Alpine Country Cottages
Beyond the simple Connectivity Pricing problem; is also, avail-
ability of technology.
IP-STAR as an example, can provide low-cost satellite connec-
tivity, capable of broadcasting from almost anywhere in Aus-
tralia at a rate suitable even; for the transmission of High-
Definition Television styled Programming. However, without
significant support - this technology is simply unavailable.
So connectivity issues are multi-factored, including issues sur-
rounding Price, Coverage and Availability of suitable Technol-
ogy.
Part of our plan is to provide what is in effect, a lab environ-
ment to test these issues with regard to how improvements to
business models can be made.
2.Market Size and Critical Mass
Regional areas have far less people in them; than urban areas.
Therefore, the number of potential viewers of content is gener-
ally significantly reduced. With the aggregation strategies of
the past; bringing about changes to business models, which
have in-turn, created cultural issues within large companies
that exhibit “elitism”, it is difficult to argue with them that
their current policy of going to a local cafe in Sydney, to meet
with their friends who run some of the largest advertising ac-
counts; is not an easier way for them to achieve their KPI’s
within their role. Why indeed, would they want to goto the ex-
pense and “hassle” of providing services into each and every
community centre throughout Australia.
Interestingly,
It seems that this type of strategy is indeed failing companies
in longer-term, non-kpi captured metrics.
The Press is becoming less, and less relevant to readers. As
the smaller pools of supporters, bring reduced revenues, re-
duced vision and reduced readership.
The problem at the moment seems more to be, that there’s a
significant market gap - that’s not being supported by local
businesses, but rather international giants, such as Google
and Facebook.
In-Turn, the ideas of journalism and its place, or perhaps role
in supporting the underlying mechanisms of democracy con-
tinue to degrade. These ideals; harbored by leading execu-
tives, full of gusto, are difficult to change. More often than
not; they’d look for a way to take, rather than share. A way to
prop-up their ways, without consideration of the implications
- at the end of the day, i’m not sure it actually harms them in
anycase; their employed by one company, when things change
and the money gets better - they’ll just move to the next com-
pany.
This area of media, needs in no insignificant measure; a level
of social entrepreneurship to “shake things up”. This type of
entrepreneurial behavior is supported overseas to a much
greater extent. Fairly reasoned perhaps, due to population dif-
ferences; these differences to not change the need to create
more sustainable models.
48
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts
March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts

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March 2013 Australian Centre Liberal Arts

  • 1. The Liberal Arts Association A CIVIC PROJECT BUILDING AND SUPPORTING A DIGITAL “KNOWLEDGE” BANKING PLATFORM LIBERAL ARTS ASSOCIATION OVERVIEW - VOLUME 1 M e d i a P r o p h e t Identity - Dignity - Liberty
  • 2. © Media Prophet This Ebook was published by Timothy Charles Holborn. All Rights are Reserved. Throughout this multimedia document, a range of 3rd party publications have been incorpo- rated. The intellectual property of these parties remain the property of those parties. References to the source of these articles has been supplied throughout the document. i Copright Statement Fair Use Agreement A Non-Transferrable License has been provided to you solely from MediaProphet. This license entitles you to review the mate- rial for consideration in regards to any further participation with MediaProphet in its project concerning the establishment of the Australian Liberal Arts Association and its business affairs. If you have any further queries relating to this proposal, you are invited to contact Timothy Charles Holborn, of Barwite, Victoria Australia by way of email: timothy.holborn@gmail.com skype: sailing_digital or mobile phone on +61 4 50257 734 (or locally on 0450 157 734). I hope you enjoy this presentation.
  • 3. Tim Holborn started working on the idea of knowledge banking in 2000. The Name, “Sailing Digital”, coined in 2003. The work surrounding this proposed platform already the subject of development and failed design. The term “Sailing Digital” sought to bring together the concept of sailing, with a crew, through a digital ocean. A personable con- cepts, relaying the need to ensuring the people, survive the journey, and that the purpose of the journey can be achieved. Back then, tim was working on Consumer Electronics, with a partner from Taiwan Over the many years, works developed. The plans, The ideas have faced numerous iterations, numerous strategies. Some of the first Video Content Businesses, delivered. Yet tim still seeks to achieve something that was the principal, the fundamental concept, still, not available in the market. The idea, that our works, when delivered over digital medium, should have a means to be protected if we want it to be. The ability to define business rules, to digital assets and objects. Content, has always faced severe challenges in how “products” are associated to revenue for content producers. With distribution, exploited or developed without even so much as an acknowledgement for the contribution, being commonplace for as long as i can remember. When i was a kid, i got on my bike and within a community of friends; figured out how computers worked, by copying software, making it run. Getting software to run, wasn’t as easy as it is today. Along with the software, were motion gifs, a treasure-trove for all teenage boys. The idea, of using computers to compile and distribute “art”, is perhaps age-old. The Idea of trying to protect con- tent, equally old. But they’ve never really figured it out. The problem is not just the security, but also, the ability to allow “beneficial” reuse. Rules for content, changes depending on what it is. In our present market, the question must not only be posed for games, office word-processing software and the like; but also, access to medical records, business plans, emails - the almost limitless universality of data, applied to all things in our lives. Sailing Digital The Knowledge Capital Platform
  • 4. I first time i put these ideas to paper was in early 2000. Young and Poor, I had tried to start a business building and selling what became known as “Media PC’s”, back then, i wanted to build a computer that worked on my TV. Through the course of this process, i came across my first busi- ness partner. Overtime, we developed the ideas. I was introduced to heads of Microsoft, told about XML. Regardless, i never sold a box. Instead, rather, we found international firms developing the same sort of thing; called “set top boxes”. My business part- ner left for Israel, ceased communications. From this point; i realized that all that work; put into docu- ments, a business opportunity - all lost, to “good-faith”. So I commenced work on what i then called “iBank”, an intel- lectual property bank. I wanted to find a way (at least for oth- ers) to support the protection of a business plan, that often takes months to develop, understanding of course; that the principle had far-greater potential. The business partner re- turned, i presented him the new work; seeking support to de- velop it. He said he wanted to build an “online data storage” service. With many in the market already, and with a name he pro- vided - basedrive - I combined the theories, considered the idea of an operating system; base, “like your arse” and drive “like your going somewhere”... A GUI based interface, like the windows start-bar - but one, for what you’ve got on your ma- chine and another for what’s available on the network. Something that worked with multiple devices, something that used online the net to store both the operating code; as well as the content. Something that could providing access to com- mon or similar assets, on multiple devices through internet based services. A system that aided with discovery, license and use of content on all types of devices, connected to the internet. iii Basedrive was my first “Cloud Computing” project. The concept was based upon a neural network, using a concept of synaptic networks as a base-theory... Basedrive Concept Presentation.
  • 5. Back then of course; Macromedia Flash, the leading interac- tive website technology, couldn’t connect to a database; there were few alternatives around, in how to deliver it. We worked with Sun Microsystems, their language “java” and “jini”, capa- ble of providing a great-deal of the functionality, and the higher-level functions, required to develop the software plat- form. We focused on TV, considering remote controls, Palm Pilots were the market leaders, with Microsoft CE devices emerging; both with color screens, and with “WiFi”. The project developed over several years. Through this pro- ject i became integrally involved with project managers at the national telecommunications company, Telstra. We worked discussed the idea with the local partner relations manager at Apple; and worked closely with SMSMT, a major Telstra con- sultancy firms; understanding of course, that all sorts of peo- ple were engaged, including accenture and an array of other potential partners. Due to the scope of the project, we became involved in defining an array of other initiatives at the time. “lets make transparency support for linux”, one partner said. In another example; one of our team leaders, set-up a a wire- less company. After he had been present during a debate about how to get a TV connected to the internet; that we needed wireless, because most people would not want a “blue cable” strung from where the modem and computer were lo- cated in the house (generally the study); through to the televi- sion. At the same-time, we were working with a major wireless equipment firm. The telecommunications company wanted to charge thousands per month, for a connection between two ends of a major street in the city, or between the Worldcom Datacentre, and our office in the middle of Collins st, Mel- bourne. We then got into a discussion about setting up what is now called a “public hotspot” provider. We wanted to help them set the infrastructure up, in return for some support in terms of providing access to the network for content delivery. Our former team-member, establishing his new wireless busi- ness; subsequently delivering some of Australia’s first Public WiFi infrastructure. So, although the business was not forfilled to its vision, and economic revenues were never really identified properly; The business forged new ground, collaboratively with a range of partners. ISP’s didn’t sell content before we started. Wireless, was in its infancy. Internet Devices, were in their infancy. In- teractive TV, was forging its first standards, DVB-MHP. There were agreements we made, but the reality in how they were implemented; were impractical at best, implausible per- haps, when considering the situations with the benefit of hind- sight. At the time, i was rather unaware of the broader issues at hand. With hindsight, the business model was flawed. It’s used often nowadays, the Idea of aggregating all sorts of con- tent, compiling it into something, is demonstrated by a range of international organisations; including Apple’s itunes and “appstore” strategies, neither of which existed at the time. We had ideas, designed into practical solutions; but without capital, they went no-where. The platform, never developed. iv
  • 6. Did we patent any of this? No. The facts was there was no funding to figure out what to pat- ent, let alone going through the patent process, something at the time i did not have the suitable amount of skills to trans- late to a patent attorney. We’d get these technical consult- ants, who’s ask a bunch of questions - then go get a job else- where, perhaps after asking for ridiculous sums of money, in return for their assistance. Patents; In terms of commercial value, it still seems are rather meaningless to a would-be patentee. Unless, the individual seeking a patent, has the funds and competency to manage the production and use of the patent “title”; patents, have be- come largely a pointless waste of money. The raw cost of a pat- ent, or other form of intellectual property registration is often in the tens or hundreds of thousands. It is not simply the ca- pacity for an individual to “invent” something that is impor- tant, but also their capacity to author and lodge the correct pa- perwork; in the correct format. To do so, in a multitude of countries. Even if a patent is lodged, the likelihood that it be- comes the “key”, to ensuring an inventor retains a commercial return for their work; is generally unlikely. Unless the patent holder has the necessary financial capacity to enforce their pat- ent rights, and maintain equity in the business used to com- mercialise the work; all sorts of behaviors work to seek expul- sion of new-market entrants, competitors; through means, which is financial in nature, and corrupt, oftentimes, to the core. Commonly (with special consideration for large multi- nationals); Internal legal department are established; designed to provide measurable economic benefit for companies through inter- nally developed strategies in how to deal with Intellectual Property related matters. Sometimes extended by depart- ments of “strategic marketing”. The purpose of these business units generally, is to exploit in- tellectual property not on a basis of law; but the capacity for law-enforcement, and the potential costs attributed to a strat- egy incorporating said mechanisms. Lawyers work on the basis of “Risk mitigation”, understand- ing that a certain percentage of people who’ve had their rights exploited will not have the capacity to enforce their rights. For those who do, only a very small percentage, will result in a damages claim being successfully delivered. The unfair use of the work, may take a few months to commercialise globally, as a product; but a court-case, and damages outcome, years. In that time, will the outcome exceeds the benefit generated by the company, by exploiting the Intellectual property in the first instance? What is the value to the company, for exploit- ing that work and preventing, or making uneconomical, the start-up and development of the company where the intellec- tual property originated; what are the flow-on benefits for market positioning, related products and commercial advan- tage for the company, and its shareholders. v
  • 7. Having specialised in the production of what is broadly termed “ideas” (being that an idea, is unprotect-able, a com- mercially advantageous term to use); this type of strategy has been found to be so widespread, it can be counted on, as a form of standard practice. If offended by it; one must consider that these types of com- mercial strategies more readily destroy peoples lives than of- fer betterment, even when successful. A form of control, un- thought of and poorly considered to the broad extent of dam- age it causes. To test this market mechanism, an experiment can easily be facilitated. Find an idea, which you know is valuable. Spend some time developing it, the create a “marketing release” strategy. Continue to develop the work; but release part of the idea to the largest national company. Work with them, as they at- tempt to rationalise the idea internally. This should take between 3-6 months. Once this process is done, the likely outcome is that they’ll close the door - suggesting the opportunity doesn’t fit, for one reason or another. Throughout this process; persuant to the experiment, ensure you’ve continued to develop the ‘idea’, relationships, documen- tation, etc. Find the biggest person in the world, a director or executive of the largest company in that field. Give them the work. Work with them, in how they implement it. The result; should be that both companies develop the work. the local “leader”, spending perhaps a few million on develop- ment; whilst the international leader, Has greater market share. Greater capacity to distribute and engage potential users. The most probable outcome, is that the bigger party; will suc- ceed in delivering the project; the others, having been lever- aged through poor behavior, as bait; learn’t something about the environment through their R&D Effort, able to get jobs with whoever works in that organisation (brain drain); the in- vestment turning sour able to license the commercial solution, but the investment lost and the intellectual property from both the inventor and the local market leader, put to waste. Interestingly; if this strategy is used in an alliance with invest- ment banking, then the production of a deal to fund the cost of developing the project with an international leader my yield 5% of the total transaction value. This in-turn, being an ob- scure way of obtaining a return; but also, a reason why a banker may be a competitor; rather than a trusted advisor or partner. Overall; this experiment can be easily replicated by people de- veloping useful things, in their homes and sheds. The prob- lem, it examples, is that of plutocracy and the unenforceability in a democracy; of law, as it should apply to all entities. vi
  • 8. In my case, the results brought about the belief that the sys- tem is broken. That there is a major problem with confidence, in the legitimate use of information. Intellectual property law is not, as it was designed to do, capable of protecting the inter- ests of “inventors” free of market discrimination. In-turn, this reduces the value, on a sliding scale, of all information based assets to zero, overtime. This manifestation of activity is con- trary to the interests of society, democractic principle and the economic platform used, to support socio-environmental, “free market” mechanisms. The concept of Freedom directly relates to freedom from persecution, and human rights as a set of common-values used to encourage trade, communica- tions and development of all things. Works by the people, provide the means of innovation. To consider otherwise; is rather a method for enslaving the peo- ple which in contemplation of the mechanisms used today; means not to a government, but rather a corporation, a sober- ing consideration overall. Whilst recently, on the news a representative of a major US Technology company attempted to argue that in terms of trust, it was better (as an australian) to trust a US Company, than a government; this was argued by a man paid to do so, by a specific groups who are threatened by the idea of “fair-play”, as the strategic marketing report would show alot of red, on the balance sheet in the short-term.. This argument in turn; should seems non-sensical, to a representative of any-such firm. perhaps later, they’ll state “it was their duty”, as a per- sonable means to justify benefit they received; knowingly ex- ploiting others, akin to the line from the film, “the company men”, where the lady put in charge of firing the staff says “well, i thought i’d be able to do some good, if i didn’t do it, someone else would”... The sociological psychology of those best subject, to the formerly described experiment.. Whilst the work continued, The problem overtime developed. The Global Financial Crises, showed the lack of accountability for economic management, through advanced uses of internet technology. Before that, the Dot-Com Crash. behavior as it has been left, destroying environments it is responsible to protect; without almost any consequence, save the few examples. The completely unsustainable model of the insecure internet, when applied to economic trade. The disunity between access for the economically privileged or urban environments; to the costs incurred by those living in regional areas, not only dimin- ishing access; but moreover, the capacity to participate. Where the greed begins, and lawless behavior is made reason- able; corruption follows. SAILING DIGITAL The term “sailing digital” was first coined in 2003, the early years of developing these concepts; overtime, it seems more and more like the best term for applying remedy to this issue of intellectual property exploitation. The Sailing Digital Knowledge Platform provides something very, very basic. The Security, of Identity and Contribution. vii
  • 9. How can this be Applied? Well, our methods use technologies and forms of the semantic internet. To Better describe what the Semantic Internet is: i’ll refer you to Tim Bernard Lee. In the following pages of this ebook; I’ll attempt to describe the principles, the technologies, the methodologies and the ap- plication strategy for a “knowledge banking systems”. My current view, is that i’m hoping to establish an non-profit organisation, capable of developing and rationalising these ideas; testing them in the market. Commercial Enterprises in Australia, formulated as “for profit” companies, still require directors to consider share- holder profits, first and foremost, with little regard for hu- manitarian values other than in terms of economic conse- quence and risk. It is therefore perceived that the structure, is that of a non-profit. It is believed that in the current market, it is best to focus on non-profit market segments, to market-test solutions whilst developing methodologies that knowingly have applications in commercial markets. The fundamental pillars of these systems are supported through the use of “open-source” software, and international standards and patent pools; which are now ready for use, de- velopment and testing. The technologies, the standards; didn’t exist in 2000. Whilst it is understood they’ll develop, the simple fact is that to suc- ceed in accomplishing the objective, they needed to exist. Akin, to the delivery of this concept, in Ebook and the words used by Steve Jobs, in the introductory video, we still have some way to go with special regard, to accessibility. 20 years ago, Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. For his next project, he’s building a web for open, linked data that could do for numbers what the Web did for words, pictures, video: Unlock our data and reframe the way we use it together. (Recorded at TED2009, February 2009 in Long Beach, California. Duration: 16:23.) The next Web of open, linked data: Tim Berners-Lee on TED.com viii
  • 10. CHAPTER 1 Technology "It's in Apple's DNA that technology alone is not enough. That it's tech- nology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our hearts sing." The closing words of Steve Jobs’ in his last speech at the iPad 2 event in March 2011 KEY ELEMENTS 1. RDF and the Semantic Web 2. Addresses: IPv6 3. WebID: Identity 4. FedoraCommons: Accounts Systems 5. Apache Solr: Search 6. Additional Components
  • 11. SECTION 1 Security and IP For the purposes of a layman and in term of digital content; security essentially means the ability to distribute for in- tended purpose whilst simultaneously adhering to the laws of the land, providing a mechanism to support policy frame- works, or permissions. When relating the concept to data, communications or Inter- net; Our solution provides an inclusive model, that supports distribution for intended purpose; is inclusive in its support of Government, for law-enforcement; whilst being provisioned on what is generally labelled an “institutional model”; where a trusted institution, subject to law, provides accounts to users. Further to these more functional aspects; our systems are dif- ferent to most others, because the methodologies start at a very low-level or functional basis; right through to the sharing elements of how distribution is made possible, and upon what basis. Beyond that, its done using opensource tools. The or- ganisation is set-up in a way - that means we support “trust” as a primary directive; and, that if you do not like the way things are being provided; you, the user, can move it else- where. Vinton Cerf is a pioneer of the Internet, having been integrally involved in the development of Internet Protocol and the data-communications layer technologies involved with basic internet services. In this video, he talks of some of the heri- tage relating to the internet and the Introduction of IPv6 10 Uploaded (to youtube) on 6 Jul 2011 Google's Vint Cerf discusses how Internet Protocol (IP) de- veloped.
 http://thenetwork.cisco.com Network Trailblazers: Vint Cerf on IPv6 By: Cisco
  • 12. KEY CHARACTERISTICS RDF is used to describe relationships The Semantic Internet uses specific technologies, which have been developed and defined. Objects and Assets obtain unique resource locations or unique digital identities. CHAPTER 1 Semantic Web - RDF The Building Blocks used for the creation of the Sailing Digi- tal, Knowledge banking platform, is based upon technologies and tools for the semantic web. These technologies are stan- dards, available freely for use. Through the application of specific standards an array of bene- fits are achieved; From the use of specific standards that en- sure data can be portable; along with the ability to develop a market-program, where although specified works are to be de- veloped by a specific firm; the technologies are not proprie- tary in nature, assisting with uptake, accessibility and data- portability. 11 Published on 22 Apr 2011 Find out what the Semantic Web is all about and how it might be structured. How can we make computers smarter so we can get the information we need in context? 
 
 From the online Web Services class offered by Computer Careers at South Central College located in North Mankato, MN 56003 USA. http://cc.SouthCentral.edu The Semantic Web - An Overview By: Peter WebExplorations
  • 13. KEY CHARACTERISTICS More IP Addresses than Grains of Sand on the Planet Integrated Security CHAPTER 1 IPv6 IPv6 is an important building block for the future of internet, for several reasons. 1. The existing IPv4 version of the internet, does not have enough addresses to service the internet user base or audi- ence. Without an Internet Protocol Address - users are simply un- able to connect. IPv6 provides more potential unique addresses, than there are grains of sand on the planet. In-turn, this potentially means that almost everything; can be provided a unique identity. 2. The address itself, also provides a means to deliver commu- nications security; in ways that were not available in the past. IPv6 has integrated security layers, which enables the encryp- tion of data between any two identified points. The implica- tion of this, is that a transaction between two parties can be secured between those two parties. This in-turn relates to Identity Systems. In-order to support users and knowledge banking systems; identity systems need to take into account both the concept of the device; in addition to the concept of the identity, the person; or perhaps more meaningfully also, the specific asset and the associations be- tween the asset, and its legal entitlements overall. To do this, we use both IPv6 and FOAF+SSL as an identity platform foundation. 12 Published on 13 Dec 2012 Confused about IPv6? This video from DrayTek help to ex- plain what it is, how it can benefit us in the future and the difference between IPv6 and IPv4. What is IPv6? By: BroadbandBuyer.co.uk
  • 14. CHAPTER 1 Identity IDENTITY Identity is fundamental to existence. The foundation to recog- nition, identity provides the means to contribute to a society. Similarly to physical identity objects; digital identity is needed to provide service offering, interactions by people on a basis of requirement; to provide integrity for participants who seek to be recognised in any economy, including the digital economy. Identity and dignity virtuously linked, through the application of “permissions systems”. Identity is more than simply recog- nition of existence, but also of choice. The systems, in-turn are designed to enable users to address situations and easily respond to requests, which in-turn related to legal concepts. All other “layers” are built upon this concept, of identity; in- cluding but not exclusive to copyright, proprietary ownership, authorship, license, sublicense and other intellectual property related laws and practices. To achieve this outcome, we’re developing systems that use WebID or FOAF+SSL. These frameworks, provide means for authentication and inte- gration of authentication methodologies with IPv6, subject to appropriate integration with a platform that is able to make this association to both the identity system, as well as the as- set or object registry associated to that identity. The focal point of our identity system is to provide the capac- ity and the opportunity for individuals to create a secure iden- 13 By: Henry Story “The current Social Networking space is a mess. We de- scribe the problems both technical, pragmatic and philo- sophical of current social netoworks, and present a solution deployable immediately that works in current browsers: an open global secure network - The Social Web.” MOVIE 1.1 The Social Network Privacy Mess: Why we need the Social Web
  • 15. tity, where their knowledge can be stored; so that the user, is able to use their knowledge towards its “fullest potential”. The fully integrated Identity models, have been applied to an an adaptive model of “knowledge banking”; as a conduit or bridge between our traditional physical economic environ- ments. The Identity models, enable identity orientated data- storage models; provide mechanisms for ‘economic value’ to be realised by participants who agree to common-economic values or principles; allowing account holders to be attributed to specified contribution (content); economically rationalised as “knowledge capital”. 14 Source: http://webid.info/ MOVIE 1.2 WebID in Use
  • 16. CHAPTER 1 The Account Platform Beyond the ability to create a WebID - or an Identity; The pur- pose of the platform, is to associate that ID, with “things”. To do this, we’ll need to store lots of different types of data, in a range of different formats. Fedora Commons, facilitates this process. The “knowledge banking” account system is an open-source technology platform. The Combination of Fedora Commons and WebID is to be packaged into a solution that enables data-portability between providers. The use of this combination of technologies, provide both port- ability and security of accounts. Accounts entries can be encrypted using multiple keys, or “fin- gerprints”. The systems in-turn, providing a facility for Per- missions to be asserted to repositories, in a way that allows a multitude of repository owners; to share data, on a permis- sions basis. There are a multitude of permissions standards. Oshani is do- ing work on this with Tim Berners Lee at MIT. Prior to this work, TimBL also worked on a standard called PAW or Permis- sions Aware Web. Whilst i’m not completely sure what the situation is with his work, the understanding is that the neces- sary work is underway, and the work involved is more about bringing these technologies together, rather than inventing the technologies, or ontologies themselves. Beyond identity information and permissions systems; a criti- cal aspect to this repository, is how data is stored for a multi- tude of purposes. Fedora Commons is able to store metadata, which can then be related to assets, as related objects. Metadata standards are available, for almost any purpose. 15 Fedora Commons is a Data-Repository, that is capable of storing all forms of information in methods that are com- patible with the Semantic Web Technologies. MOVIE 1.3 Fedora Commons Overview
  • 17. OPEN-SOURCE It is envisaged that several “knowledge capital” providers will become established; where consumers or customers of these services, will have choices about how they intend to interact with these services; which service providers they choose to work with; and upon what basis. If the consumer, decides to migrate from one account provider - to another - they can; this is made possible technically; through the use of appropri- ate standards, and the development methodology as to ensure both portability and accessibility, for users. The System will however, use an institutional methodology for authentication to support the on-going development and sup- port of the “web of trust”. Web Of Trust The Web of Trust; is a term coined by Phil Zimmermann in 1992 in the manual for PGP version 2.0: “As time goes on, you will accumulate keys from other people that you may want to designate as trusted introducers. Eve- ryone else will each choose their own trusted introducers. And everyone will gradually accumulate and distribute with their key a collection of certifying signatures from other peo- ple, with the expectation that anyone receiving it will trust at least one or two of the signatures. This will cause the emer- gence of a decentralized fault-tolerant web of confidence for all public keys.”2 PGP is an encryption methodology; that is a technical function providing the basis to security systems on the internet. At the time, he published the specification in a book; to get around US Security laws, that would have made it illegal to provide ac- cess to this type of technology documentation outside of the US. In simple Terms, PGP is a Digital Lock and Key method; and whilst PGP is a specific technology, the type of encryption is unrelated to the concept of “trust” over digital networks. To more easily understand the concept; one could consider a traditional financial institution, or bank. Users, create accounts; where funds are stored, for use. These accounts and the money held within the accounts are stored there; under the assumption of trust with the institutional pro- vider. If access to the account is fraudulently made available; the in- stitutional provider assists; in equal terms, to if access keys, cards or related financial instruments are lost, misplaced or assistance is required by the legitimate account holder; then, The institutional provider is able to reissue the appropriate key, as to reinstate access to said legitimate user of that ac- count. Files, data, can be encrypted using these types of methodolo- gies, associated to the repository and the webid based authen- tication process (incorporating encryption). 16
  • 18. RDF STORE AND APACHE SOLR 1. Mulgara integrates with Fedora Commons to provide a Semantic Data Storage Platform. When integrated with Apache Solr, the result is advanced search capabilities, 2. This provides a means to search the repository and find specific data, based on metadata tags. 3. In-Turn, this allows libraries of information to be easily searched and resourced. SECTION 6 Search The database platform is integrated with advanced search technology. Through the application of advanced metadata systems, from the ground-up, subject to permissions records are pre- integrated with faceted search capabilities. This key function is integrated to the core of the platform. This methodology, helps Application developers create inter- faces based upon search functionality, using RDF Syntax. The Result, is a portable, permissions based data-store that can be applied for use by a multitude of applications, without concern for the storage format other than, the compatibility with RDF / XML Schemas. 17 Steve Bayliss, Senior Analyst/Developer (Acuity Unlimited) Chris Wilper, Fedora Tech Lead (Duraspace) RiRi 2011 - RDF, Linked Data, and the Resource Index
  • 19. SECTION 7 Additional Components Mulgara is not based on a relational database due to the large numbers of table joins encountered by relational sys- tems when dealing with metadata. Instead, Mulgara is a com- pletely new database optimized for metadata management. Mulgara models hold metadata in the form of short subject- predicate-object statements, much like the W3C's Resource Description Framework (RDF) standard. Metadata may be im- ported into or exported from Mulgara in RDF. GeoServer - an open-source server written in Java - allows users to share, process and edit geospatial data. Using GeoServer enables us to package, with the platform, a map- ping engine that ensures geo-spacial data used throughout the systems are accessible. Video Video requirements are sophisticated, and requires a unique solution. There are several open-source options, for elements of the core-stack, such as Red5, an OpenSource Me- dia Server; and Kaltura CE, an Opensource Video CMS. Per- haps the most interesting piece of work in this area is the ava- lon media systems platform, using the same software stack. Video systems is perhaps one of the more commercial areas of opportunity throughout. Few good examples exist, in how ad- vanced Video services are provided to users, on an equitable basis. Examples range from the basic elements of making a youtube clip available; or, perhaps enabling video conferenc- ing; right through to the more sophisticated examples, such as analyzing audio to create subtitles or audio transcriptions; video analytics, to identify people in videos; or indeed, dupli- cate videos which need to be referred to licensing considera- tions; or in other fields, The ability to aggregate and search for multiple content as- sets; then affiliate those assets, by way of an editor which en- ables a user to create something new; without breaching li- censing agreements; or, Building and deploying hybridTV Packages (content, for Broadcast / Broadband connected device Consumption) or creating a platform that can use 3 cameras, to create a multi-dimensional virtual holographic scene store; which could be used to create a linear video object, with any form of specified camera flight-path, or perhaps even render the envi- 18 KEY ELEMENTS 1. Mulgara Database 2. GeoServer 3. Video 4. EBooks and Publishing 5. Ubuntu (Debian) and Virtual Box 6. Front-End Applications
  • 20. ronment into a gaming platform like space; for exploring by users in a specified program. The Video Segment is still rather new in terms of technology development opportunities, strategies and methodologies. Whilst there are certainly some very good solutions out there, some of the important aspects; such as these systems use of Databases, needs to be considered; in line with RDF, and our XML Back-end processes. Herein, the Avalon Media Systems project (and certainly, the affiliated Project Hydra) are exist- ing pieces being developed, where an integrated program for participatory development with these projects seems to be a very good option. This area, will be one of growth and devel- opment, which in-turn is expected to yield results. EBooks and Publishing EPUB3 is an “Ebook” format that can incorporate animation, multimedia and text as a distrib- uted package file. Fundamentally, it is based upon the HTML5, CSS3 set of web-page standards which in-turn, cre- ates a method do develop and deploy applications. The specifi- cation, includes DRM Support - meaning publications can be encrypted and made subject to rules; which in-effect, enables the platform owner to package objects into an application and deliver it to users on specified terms; implementing agree- ments with a subset of licensees to a delivered multimedia publication. Ubuntu / Debian are types of the linux operating system. Ubuntu is based on Debian, and whilst larger enterprise server environments may use debian, ubuntu is a friendly way of packaging it. VirtualBox, is an integrated Virtual Ma- chine, enabling the creation of a file, which incorporates appli- cations and the operating system into a portable, download- able object. We use VirtualBox as a way to distribute the pack- age, and enable portability. The operating systems within the package, is Linux based (ie: Debian / Ubuntu). Front End Applications The Technology Stack described, provides an advanced server for securing and storing information in terms of assets, ob- jects, relationships, etc. Due to the standards orientated nature of the systems, the lan- guages used are able to create an abstraction layer, between the underlying principles and the outcome that is sought by the user. To make this useful, applications need to be devel- oped that use this functionality, as a core web-services plat- form. The Next Chapter will discuss a range of different appli- cations, the RDF / XML Schema’s used in those applications and the functionality provided. All applications can provide services to other applications. This is the design of this Seman- tic Web, Application and Knowledge Banking Platform. Due to the nature of the packaged environment, developers are able to package instances of applications to suit this envi- ronment and make applications easy to install by users. Appli- cations may not necessarily be distributed Freely; but in all in- stances, must use standard data-types, as to ensure a users ca- pacity to remove any 3rd party applications and be left with their data still in a useful state. 19
  • 21. A MULTITUDE OF PLUG-INS 1. WebService Plug-ins are becoming somewhat ubiquitous. A Multitude of service providers offer these plugins. 2. The Ability to Use plugins; depends upon the security of the application environment; whether the plug-in degrades the security of the information or otherwise. 3. Plug-ins can help enhance functionality 4. Plugins is a way Service Providers can integrate specific applications, into environments; which in-turn, can be easily integrated by Application Providers. 5. The Ability for Application Providers, to make access available off-line. SECTION 8 Plug-Ins / Pixlr is an online imaging editing tool, enabling an image to be imported on the net, edited and saved. Maqetta is an open- source HTML5 Editing Tools, at the moment - it still looks very technical, but the idea is there, its working, it can be de- veloped or used the way it is. When looking at things like on- line video editing WeVideo and VideoToolbox are just some of the solutions out there. More advanced video analytics sys- tems, such as transcribing Audio to text, using phonetics, World Systems showing applications of these types speech analysis technologies for researching the emotional responses to specific words from call-centre environments; and whilst, in our market it is far more important to create a method to easily transcode the many hundreds of thousands of hours of footage, and make it searchable; the potential applications for these systems, when “plugged into” the knowledge banking “cloud”; a cloud with advanced security mechanisms, is both enormous and much safer, than the alternatives available. This platform, does not need to reinvent everything; but rather, provide stable foundations for others to support the de- velopment of applications, and the growth of usage by custom- ers. Due to the nature of the system; in that it can be down- loaded, Perhaps interestingly; this provides a secure method to enable the download, of otherwise online-only applications, subject to the size of the applications. This is only made possi- ble due to the nature of the underlying security mechanisms, however it is important that if applications move online, their also available for use by customers if they loose connectivity. 20
  • 22. CHAPTER 2 Applications APPLICATIONS OF IDENTITY AND ACCOUNTS 1. Authentication 2. Digital Rights Management 3. Secure Web-Data Services 4. Libraries 5. Social Networking 6. Secure Communications 7. Licensing 8. Digital Receipt, POS and E-Commerce 9. Publishing 10. Web2World Services 11. Secure Information Storage 12. Digital Economy 13. Distributed Infrastructure Management 14. Multimedia Production and Publishing
  • 23. SECTION 1 Knowledge Capital The Copyright Clause of the United States Constitution (1787) authorised copyright legislation: "To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." That is, by guaranteeing them a pe- riod of time in which they alone could profit from their works, they would be enabled and encouraged to invest the time re- quired to create them, and this would be good for society as a whole. (REF) More than 200 years later, this concept of intellectual contri- butions and the rightful use of content; has evolved to become perhaps one of the most important areas of law and economic development; throughout the brave-new world, embodied by the “digital economy”; a fundamental pillars of democratic participation via the use of internet, and virtual economic de- velopment environments. The philosophical or “higher princi- ples” status of copyright laws, as introduced in the 1700’s on- wards; when applied to the concept of internet and digital economy - requires the establishing a “knowledge banking” platform. We believe, that this is now possible; in ways only theoretical some decade before; through the use of semantic internet technologies for the purpose of providing accounts, with permissions, for a myriad of content and identity serv- ices; which in-turn interact with content assets, and trade. As part of our development program, we will be integrating a Permissions platform that enables the user to manage content and permissions. These systems will have the capacity to inte- grate with a banking gateway on the institutional providers platform. In our model, the institutional provider, provides services for the user, so that they are able to manage their own permissions in how they use other services, on their terms. One of the biggest problems this program will face, is that “Opensource”, takes almost no account for contributors; whereas other commercial software, generally takes owner- ship. In this model, neither elements suit our changes, to the copyright and intellectual property ownership model as they do not implement means, in code, to affiliate to license. 22 “If a man empties his purse into his head no one can take it away from him. An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest.” Benjamin Franklin
  • 24. With Regard to Licensing models; Each licensing paradigm, have already a range of requirements. Our Semantic Platform is able to implement those licenses, through the application of the identity system. Using the replication functions (ie: virtualbox) applications can be made available offline (but will validate, upon synchro- nization with an online source). This is important when appli- cations are used in local areas, where internet connectivity is of poor quality either in terms of speed, or usage qualities pur- suant to the providers terms. However; What it currently seems difficult to do, is to auto- matically add applications that appear out there in the broader environment. The reason for this is the database plat- form. Most open-source solutions use a MySQL Back-End (data- base) to store all data associated to that application, including user data. This model essentially federates the data- repository to be owned by the application owner; rather, than a software service - where the users, own the user-data and the application provider, owns the application data (by de- fault). Existing Source-Codes can be changed to modify this situa- tion, and in-turn make existing packages capable and compati- ble with this knowledge platform. How this is done, is some- thing that needs to be examined on a case-by-case basis. Essentially, the quantum shift is in how data is distributed, stored and used by communities. Whether those communi- ties are formed through the common use of a business, an ap- plication or a service; the community in-turn shares informa- tion within the community on some form of terms, as to en- sure the community functions. The problem has been, that by participating with 3rd party sys- tems, the knowledge pertaining to that community becomes owned by the operator of the application on a semi-exclusive basis. They are able to grant you rights, to your information. A method, that’s made upon the inception of the introduction to a community, where the newly formed participant may not be fully-aware of the implications pursuant to their participa- tion. Furthermore, the commercial rights are most often ex- changed immediately, in return for the opportunity to partici- pate. This type of arrangement has proven to be unsustainable, and whilst the necessary changes are substantially more in the short-term, with regard for migration to an alternative meth- odology for Knowledge Management; to that of this knowl- edge banking process, The change seems necessary, and an important step towards the use of Internet Technology, for Economic Development, Sustainability and the application of Internet for Digital Econ- omy, in a manner consistent with the views and ideals, of a de- mocracy. 23
  • 25. HERITAGE SYSTEMS 1. On-site equipment using Apple Aperture for images, Final Cut Pro for Video. 2. A Great Example of a Front-End, is Omeka with NeatLines. Key Functionality A. The ability to store off-site, preservation copies of assets. B. The Ability to provide approved access to Heritage and Educational Institutions C. The ability to sell prints of products and/or license of digital versions on a range of terms. D. The ability to use declared naming systems, providing a mechanism to give each unique asset an identity. E. The ability for secure-interaction with public users to enable contributions F. The ability to transcribe and identify duplicates from multiple providers to enrich data- integrity. SECTION 2 HERITAGE Heritage Systems actually have a range of common- functionality with many other data-repositories. Heritage, involves digitising assets to “preservation quality”. Once the assets are digitised, metadata is added about the as- sets, which in-turn provides a mechanism to search for the as- set and relate it to purpose or knowledge. A Test-Bed has been established in Mansfield Victoria. This test-bed is digitising assets, to preservation quality, using equipment driven by an Apple Mac. IMAGES Images, are stored using Aperture, which provides interfaces for metadata including geographical information, and naming people in photos. These functions, in addition to the normal forms of metadata entry, enable an array of advanced heritage applications. Whilst the process, is of equal benefit to other organizations such as publishing firms and the press; in cataloguing and storing records, it could be suggested that in-turn, these or- ganizations are also storing records in a heritage like format, even if the records are new. VHS TAPES VHS Tapes are being digitised using a VHS, and a Black Magic Card, with its included software. Once the VHS has been digit- ised, it is brought into Final Cut Pro, for editing and enhance- 24
  • 26. ment. Once this enhancement has been done, it is exported as a file. The Knowledge Banking Platform is needed to support the storage and analysis of these records. A Similar process can be used for both motion image, in addition to still-images. One of the critical functions, is to identify duplicate records, in terms of the origin asset. An asset, will have an array of me- tadata associated to it; and rules, on how that metadata is shared. A Video, as an example, may have a range of different meanings for different users associated to that video asset. In the context of a heritage institution; a News Video Clip may have been captured and broadcast on the local or national news in a specific year, documenting something that becomes historically relevant. For the purpose of this example, the original tape has been converted (even though, often-times their gathering dust, requiring specialized aging equipment to transcode to digital) and a Historical Society, has digitised the same article, captured from the broadcast source (ie: freetv) onto a VHS tape. The Article is important to the Historical Society; as it de- scribes something of local history, incorporating a local issue and local people. The background knowledge associated to that video, is often contributed towards by parties outside of the broadcaster or the reporter involved in the broadcast tape production at the time. There may be new information per- taining to that broadcast, and the tape is needed to put the story into historical perspective. However, the tape itself, is not the property of the Historical Society. So the Historical Society, in this example, can create the re- cord, include the metadata and enter it into their library. However using Online Services, the video is then matched against the broadcasters version; and the videos are flagged. The ability to replace the video asset is then made available, which becomes appended to the original record of the histori- cal society; and the commercial license terms for using that video asset, provided back to the broadcaster with a standards agreement used to ensure the article is still available to the his- torical society for heritage and educational use (civic purpose) IDENTITIES AND GENEALOGY Genealogical research is an incredible field, with enormous potential for clinical use in medical research, social research and an array of other purpose. From our trials, we’ve found the first aspect; of identifying a specified name to a unique identity (meaning person, in this instance) is something that needs to be considered, Heritage research in the 1800‘s / early 1900‘s shows that peo- ple indeed moved around, and often contributed to an array of different geographical environments. Beyond that, family data is then often made available from an array of different sources and locations. 25
  • 27. In-order to create a coherent collection, the best-case senario is to create a unique identity for these people; understanding that a virtual collection may be created; incorporating an ar- ray of objects, from an array of different providers. Assets would likely include legal records, to representations of these people in photos, press articles, etc. It is suggested that a metadata registry be created to support the naming of individuals, for use. How this is done, is to be explored; and the ability to assert a label, which can be up- graded at a latter date; seems the best path in the short-term. COLLECTIONS Heritage Societies create collections. Collections can include collections of local papers, A families photo collection, or an array of articles about an important historical site; in-effect, a curated collection on specified topic. Rights management is needed to ensure the “sharing” of re- cords can be equitably achieved, for civic purposes at a mini- mum. Articles may be part of a multitude of collections. The use of collections, is for the grouping of records. EXHIBITS Heritage institutions archive collections, and in-turn create ex- hibits. An Exhibit provides narrative to a collection. The Exhibit system needs to be easy to use, by a technical lay- man. The systems, need to counter-reference objects and as- sets, acquiring additional information about those records as exhibits are created. The purpose of an exhibit, is in essence for publishing. No- Matter what platform the exhibit is published in, the content should inter-relate on a fixed basis, using the knowledge- banking back-end; to semantically derive the content, in the order or presentation made by the curator of the exhibit. E-Books and Publishing The E-Book and Publishing function is designed to assist with Revenue Creation. Exhibits and Assets can be published, subject to the commer- cial terms of supply. Whilst a focus on civic purpose, is inte- grated throughout the environment (that is, for non- commercial purpose); the ability to sell photos and images as printed products; and the ability to publish exhibits and books, as both published and interactive digital products is en- visaged to provide function to the organisational process of storing and restoring heritage collections. Heritage Societies today, are often supported by volunteer sen- iors from local communities who have more knowledge in their heads about heritage, than is stored in the many filing cabinets and boxes held throughout the heritage institutions. 26
  • 28. Operationally, the civic purpose of this program is multi- dimensional. In Australia, our education system has only re- cently introduced a civics curricula. Whilst history has been part of our curriculum for sometime, the resources available to best teach local history, have been stored in these filing cabi- nets of heritage institutions. We consider that there are sev- eral opportunities to create community programs where stu- dents, work with seniors at or with historical societies. Whilst heritage is the critical path; the sociological aspects in- volved are numerous, and advantageous for accelerating deliv- ery of digital economic development. Seniors often have poor digital technology literacy. In the past, this could be best summarized as poor computer skills, but the reality today, is that it is not simply a desktop com- puter; but moreover, telephones, internet devices, communica- tion requirements - like email; and the ability to receive com- munity information on advanced consumer electronics like TV’s, Blu-Ray Players, etc. Combined with the lack of education or functional knowledge; are the potential health benefits, on a social level; in affiliation to mental and physical well-being. The stress caused when seniors are forced to interact with cor- porations who demand the use of digital technology, is signifi- cant. The benefit for seniors with health problems, such as poor-eyesight - being able to consumer knowledge, through text-to-audio functions, is also significant; and this is just one example. In terms of Aged Care; Technology has the capacity to provide video conferencing, or remote tele-medicine. These functions go beyond the pure-purpose of heritage, or seniors - in remote and regional areas, the ability for clinical specialists to get involved with healthcare, subject to accessi- bility to technology and available information; may offer re- markable opportunities to health-care generally. When it comes to how seniors learn technology, they are inter- ested in seeing their children and grandchildren, but their not very interested in Facebook. Skype, is well accepted. They’ve got interests in the news, in holidays - going places, seeing things; but currently, they’ll use a telephone or perhaps email. They’ll buy the paper. A book is good, but they often don’t know about text-to-audio functions of e-books. Computers are frightening; but they’ve never really consid- ered something like an ipad. It’s expensive, and it doesn’t have a keyboard; but they’ve never really tried to touch- interface, nor the applications that live on the device. They didn’t really like mobile phones either, but now - they’ve got simple ones. By Supporting the production of digital heritage libraries, the interactive effect; is that the program is also supporting the de- velopment of digital literacy skills, by seniors, whilst simulta- neously (through this strategy) protecting their information. 27
  • 29. SOCIAL APPLICATION FRAMEWORKS 1. All Users need to have an Account 2. Applications are managed by Non-Profits 3. Application Providers must both Publish their own works; in addition to supporting community engagement in some way. 4. Access and interactions with community must be based on specified purpose. 5. Development programs may be supported by commercial businesses 6. The Business Models can apply memberships and premium access environments. 7. Participants are in control of permissions. SECTION 3 SOCIAL We’re currently developing a few key social programs, two are based upon social-networking methods; the other, based on a membership program, which in-turn provides a mechanism to consider how clubs might use these systems. SOCIAL NETWORK PLATFORMS Tourist Tourist is an application designed for travellers, and tourism service providers. The Tourist program, has two key interfaces; one for suppliers or businesses seeking to provide services to tourists, the other for tourists to find, discover and plan a trip. From the Tourists perspective; their able to search and find a place they want to goto. As a tourist, they’ll be interested to find both places their able to stay (accommodation); as well as resourcing local activities and perhaps tourist services, such as vehicle hire, translators or tour-guides and other assorted services. Tourist Example 1 Say for example; a bunch of uni-students, want to go out to the country for a few days. They’d like to go ride a horse for a few days, perhaps - go fishing, and go canoeing down the howqua river. Their objective, is an adventure holiday. 28
  • 30. So, in that case; their able to use a mapping system, to track- out where they’d like to hike. In-Turn, this can associate to the local parks governance (parks vic, for example) to notify them that there’s a bunch of city people, hiking through the forest. So, if there’s a fire - they know where they might find them. There’s a hut in the middle of their trek, it seems sensible to see if it’s available; and it is!! they’ll need to get the keys, and pay for the accommodation. They don’t have horses, and really don’t know much about them. The service is available, costs a few hundred each. They’ll book that, send them the proposed trek, and seek feed- back and/or confirmation. Charlie, the local horse tour guy, receives the message - but doesn’t think the trek path is best; so he suggests an alternative route, using his local knowledge. The uni-kids receive this, and agree that its best to go with the local knowledge. The hut has a river in front of it. Good place to learn how to fly-fish. They send the place, and the request - with the number of peo- ple, to the business that provides fly-fishing. They answer a bunch of questions - do they want to buy the equipment or hire it, how long do they want some help? etc. The fishing tour guy, sends back a response - all good, per- haps a different place (better for catching trout) - again, the students agree. it all fits in. They’ll need some food, could take it with them: but it can be delivered to the hut, if they like. They connect with the local IGA site, make arrangements, all sorted. Their not sure if they’ve got insurance; they’ve heard about people breaking legs, or whatever, needing a helicopter - happy to be alive, with a huge debt; luckily, there’s an option for that too. Some get it, some don’t, all good. The web looks at the trip; and notifies them that there’s no mo- bile coverage. An offer is available from the local tourism cen- tre, to loan a satellite tracking device; with an emergency func- tion. they decide that’s a good idea too. Their able to split the cost per head; Money’s paid; and, they can print out their itinerary. In the last minute, a friend from interstate wants to come along; they can send them a link, all the suppliers get a notifi- cation - 1 more? yes/no - all say yes - their mate, pays the addi- tional - all sorted. They get there, pick-up the bits and pieces from the local infor- mation centre (tourism centre) and have a great holiday. They get back, the expedition, with photos (if they like) can be posted to their accounts, shared - with Facebook and recom- mended to others. 29
  • 31. Summary: In this example, the students were not-only able to resource the small business operators for the special needs they had, in seeking their holiday; and, make bookings for not just the ac- commodation, but also the services relating to their holiday, which helped make the experience a success. Because they were out in forest, they were also able to notify the local authorities, to ensure that if anything went wrong, they could be found. They were also able to engage locals, to resource all the bits and pieces they wanted to ensure their holiday went smoothly. TOURIST EXAMPLE 2 An Overseas Couple, have heard so much about Australia that they’ve decided to go on a holiday to find out about the place. They only speak arabic well, they do speak a bit of english; but are not confident about their skills. They’d prefer to have someone come with them, to act as a tour-guide. They’d like a bit of adventure. money’s not really the prob- lem, they’re more interested in the experience. So, They’d like to find a house or apartment; with a BBQ. Their flying in to Melbourne, and they’d like to drive a Holden HSV. They’d like to go somewhere they can go into the bush, but they’d also like to spend sometime on the water, water-skiing. They’d buy a boat, but would prefer not to. similarly they’d buy the car, but would prefer not to. They’d prefer not to get ripped off, and feel that in their over- seas trips to european places, they’ve often been treated poorly because of their race and anthropological background. Always looking at investments; life is more about making a positive contribution, than it is about making a profit and ex- ploiting others. They do a search; find that there is a lake, called Eildon and near it, the alpine alps. they would like to make a holiday. Their trip, will include some business in Sydney, and Can- berra - but they don’t like the city. OUTCOME The system can then go find a HSV to hire, find an apartment that suits their needs; make arrangements for helicopters, and transport for a boat that will be hired; the authorities notified, to obtain license requirements for using the equipment. A Tour-Guide is found; accommodation booked from them also, nearby, with a services contract to support their needs throughout their stay. Whilst not going into the details, the overview is that all their needs can be catered for; through this market-place based ap- 30
  • 32. plication. In simple terms; it’s designed to be more than sim- ply an accommodation booking site; and more of a tourism site. MERCHANT INTERFACE Merchants on this system, are all sorts of providers. From ac- commodation, to hire companies, tour-guides, caterers, adven- ture experience providers etc. These providers are able to offer services and track their calen- dars, to ensure they’re not booked to provide services to more than one party simultaneously. Their in-effect contracted to provide those services based on mutual agreement. They’re not obligated to accept a job, until they’ve actually accepted it in the system. Their able to discuss things with potential cus- tomers, and help to improve the offer and the experience had; but the proposed customers. ECONOMIC OUTCOME For all tourists, but especially interstate of state based travel to small townships, it is difficult to identify the relevant serv- ice providers affiliated to that area. Questions, such as where the best restaurants are, how can i go horse riding or go water-skiing are often both difficult to find from a customers perspective; as well as from a suppliers perspective; often diffi- cult to supply, in many cases with regard to insurance require- ments. It is envisaged that this application will assist in em- ployment and economic development of regional areas espe- cially. ACTIVITY AND SOCIAL HEALTH APPLICATION Working with Life Be In It; an application concept has come- about, where sporting and social events can be advertised on a common-social platform; enabling consumers to search and find activities they’d like to participate in; resourcing the loca- tion of the event, and the necessary information needed to par- ticipate (including costs, etc.). The system is very similar in function to the Tourist system; in that it connects suppliers to people, in a social-network orien- tated way. The Secondary aspect to the program; is that in this instance, the ability to provide results or certifications for participation by the event organiser, back to the participants account; is en- abled. This means in-turn, that the user is able to advertise on Face- book or otherwise, their involved in running, sailing, golf of charitable events; and add this participatory information, to their social-profile. Similarly to the tourism site; participation in many sporting clubs often needs memberships and insurances. This sort of thing could be handled by this system, for temporary or guest club attendees, to avert potential harm from any club offering the opportunity to participate; for would-be new-members or participants; prior to their payment of membership, should it be required for on-going participation with the club. 31
  • 33. CLUB WEBSITES A Club has recently approached us to develop a site, which demonstrates their club; and hopefully, provides a means for the club to get revenue. In this case, it’s a players association; where the club raises money to support former professional players, should they run into trouble later in life; as well as, providing community services after the days of their profes- sional careers end. The Club had the right to sell images and other materials from the club, as printed products. In Essence; the club is treated much like a historical society; with an array of assets, which it can provide users, who seem public access or membership. The Website created; helps the club by creating membership identities for members of the site; which enables them to use that membership at other outlets where the membership is meaningful. In addition to this function, their also able to sell printed products to the public, to help raise funds for the mem- bership club, and its purpose. BROADER SCOPE Clubs or incorporated associations, support an array of sport- ing groups and their activities. Most clubs, have an array of services they offer - whether it be facilitating sporting activi- ties, social or other civic purpose; clubs, provide both commu- nity support, in addition to collecting heritage assets of value to the community. Clubs have Membership systems; these membership systems can be integrated with the Knowledge banking system, to cre- ate membership identities. It is envisaged that the potential scope of use for clubs, with this platform, is substantial. The permissions based social-web functions of the underlying systems and processes, enable club-membership to be shared with identity; as it is in real-life both for the people involved with the club. Some clubs have problems when it comes to corruption, al- though these clubs are more-often called “gangs”. The use of this platform may assist in governance, and sup- port for clubs for the operation of their club for legitimate pur- pose. Another aspect this system will likely be capable of support- ing, is a donations system; in association to the retail POS plat- forms. Whilst the full-scope of opportunities for the applica- tion of these systems for clubs has not been fully explored; the area is expected to be an opportunity for applying the pro- gram of work, to civic purpose; whilst facilitating a mecha- nism that can provide “proof of concept” and “pre-sales” activi- ties to commercial entities who may later wish to make other applications that are more commercially geared. 32
  • 34. E-COMMERCE FOR SMALL BUSINESS 1. A Digital Receipt System integrated into Computer based POS 2. An E-Commerce Solution A. Ability to Synchronize POS Information B. Ability to create Loyalty Programs C. Ability to Participate with Supplier Loyalty Programs 3. Shipping Support Systems 4. Banking Gateways Assistance 5. Web to Physical (EG:Print, Post) 6. Data analytics CHAPTER 2 Small Business Small Business E-Commerce
 The underlying technologies are an XML Schema for Point of Sale, which is then integrated via Microsoft Software, into spe- cific Point of Sale Software Solutions. This software is distributed with a hardware based NFC (Near Field Communications) reader; which is used at the point of sale, in association to Financial Transactions. If both parties have E-Commerce enabled in their profiles; this can be facilitated online, with the NFC Reader. The Customer side; uses a digital receipt standard, to capture information relating to a transaction, which is then posted to their knowledge bank. Through this process, a relationship is created between the user, and the business. The user is able to log-into their knowledge bank, and set per- missions around whether they’d like to receive marketing ma- terials from that supplier; and otherwise, whether they’d like to maintain a relationship in anyway with the supplier, be- yond receiving the digital receipt. The end-user (customer) is also able to set-permissions for specific brands or suppliers; a brand may run a campaign, that says “if you buy 15 bottles of “Mountain Water” within 2 weeks (As an example), you’ll receive the next one free”, the retailer reimbursed by the supplier - using the digital receipt system to track sales. Similarly; a store may have a “local re- wards” program, discounting services to locals. 33
  • 35. The other key function, is the ability for product sellers; to cre- ate an online shop, with relative ease, and for that shop to share information with the Point of Sale System. As an example; A tourist visits an antique shop, and is very interested in a piece of furniture; but has no intention of purchasing, and shipping it immediately., perhaps, they’d prefer to spend that weeks salary on the holiday... They get home, still haven’t forgotten about the furniture item. The customer, asked the shop-owner to send them a link. The shop owner did so, using the NFC Chip - so the customer didn’t need to give the shop their personal details. The customer goes into their records, finds the object; it’s still there, so they decide to buy it and have it shipped. The shop, in their system; have a specific shipping agent they prefer to use, their son (perhaps). The price, including deliv- ery, is organised, and delivery is arranged. The parties can agree on being paid up-front, or part up-front, and part upon delivery. Upon delivery, the shop-clerk, uses their NFC Reader, with the customers NFC Card - to confirm delivery and finalise the order; the customer does so, acknowl- edging the product is as expected; and the deal is done. Many Small Businesses make the transition to a smart point of sale device; namely due to the benefits in accounting sys- tems, stock management and the capacity to provide some- sort of membership program. However the reality is that not many people want a member- ship card from every shop, on their person. Beyond the membership problem; the e-commerce problem, is also rather substantial. Many small business operators can set-up a Point of Sale Machine. But Setting up a website, with e-commerce is somewhat more difficult. The idea of this application; is to make it easier. The key elements needed within the Knowledge Banking Sys- tem, is the capacity to provide these types of services; rather than being the sole operator of these types of services. Using the Semantic RDF Architecture, naming conventions are standardised. This in-turn offers opportunities to application developers, to make better systems; that work on common principles. The purpose of this project, is to demonstrate and create a proof of concept. Whilst we can certainly deliver this pro- gram; it may be deemed better, to assist the market in adapt- ing their programs, to work with our systems, working as a partner rather than as a competitor. 34
  • 36. CHAPTER 3 Technology Fund A Non-Profit Funding Mechanism that’s created an funded through the use of the platform for financial transactional pur- poses. A percentage of these revenues go to- wards the distribution of technology and training programs for civic purpose. The First agenda item for the technology Fund, will be the creation and distribu- tion of Heritage solutions for civic and educational use, to smaller heritage insti- tutions who are the leaders of heritage management in shires; could not other- wise fund the cost without external sup- port.
  • 37. CHAPTER 4 The ACLA Association The Business is to be established as a Non-Profit Association. The business name is to be the Liberal Arts Association Inc. This Association will own a second busi- ness name being “the Australian Centre for Liberal Arts”. The Website will be: ACLA.org.au
  • 38. THE ACLA THE LIBERAL ARTS ASSOCIATION The Definition of Liberal arts education From Wikipedia The seven liberal arts – Picture from the Hortus deliciarum of Herrad von Landsberg (12th century) The liberal arts (Latin: artes liberales) are those subjects or skills that in classical antiq- uity were considered essential for a free person (a citizen) to know in order to take an ac- tive part in civic life. In Ancient Greece this included participating in public debate, de- fending oneself in court, serving on juries, and most importantly, military service (slaves and resident aliens were by definition excluded from the duties and responsibilities of citi- zenship). The aim of these studies was to produce a virtuous, knowledgeable, and articu- late person. Grammar, rhetoric, and logic were the core liberal arts. During medieval times, when learning came under the purview of the Church, these subjects (called the Trivium) were extended to include arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy (which included the study of astrology). This extended curriculum was called the Quadrivium. To- gether the Trivium and Quadrivium constituted the seven liberal arts of the medieval uni- versity curriculum. In the Renaissance, the Italian humanists, who in many respects con- tinued the grammatical and rhetorical traditions of the Middle Ages, rechristened the old Trivium with a new and more ambitious name: Studia humanitatis, and also increased its scope. They excluded logic and added to the traditional Latin grammar and rhetoric not only history, Greek, and moral philosophy (ethics), but made poetry, once a sequel of grammar and rhetoric, the most important member of the whole group.[1] The educa- tional curriculum of humanism spread throughout Europe during the sixteenth century and became the educational foundation for the schooling of European elites, the function- aries of political administration, the clergy of the various legally recognized churches, and the learned professions of law and medicine.[2]The ideal of a liberal arts, or humanistic education grounded in classical languages and literature, persisted un- til the middle of the twentieth century. In modern times liberal arts is a term which can be interpreted in different ways. It can refer to certain areas of literature,languages, philosophy, history, mathematics, psychology, and science.[3] It can also refer to studies on a liberal arts degree program. For example, Harvard University offers a Master of Lib- eral Arts degree, which covers biological and social sciences as well as the humanities.[4] For both interpretations, the term generally refers to matters not re- lating to theprofessional, vocational, or technical curricula. Arguably,[weasel words][who?][original research?] liberal professions, so-called[weasel words] "learned professions"[citation needed], include only professions which require education at the university: medicine, for example, as well as law and architec- ture—heirs of the Trivium and theQuadrivium.[original research?]
  • 39. ASSOCIATION FOCUS 1. Build Systems for Civic Purpose 2. Apply Technology Opportunities for the Public Good. 3. Uphold the Principles of Democracy and Human Rights 4. Be Inclusive in how Solutions are made available to others. Do not discriminate against others without judicial purpose. 5. Support and develop solutions for the growth of prosperous economic outcomes 6. Uphold the rights of the account holders. The information stored by us, is in trust, our purpose is to assist them in their use of that information as a Knowledge Banking Provider. SECTION 1 Membership The Organization being established is a Non-Profit Organiza- tion, for the specific purpose of ensuring any and all board or committee decisions are focused on the public good, rather than profit generating opportunities for shareholders. We are a Membership based association with support for pub- lic access, where applicable. MEMBERSHIP TYPES 1. NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION (CLASS HERITAGE) The Heritage Class of Membership is designed to heritage in- stitutions. This class of membership, allows us to manage our heritage organizations more specifically; supporting their spe- cial needs. 1. NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION (CLASS CLUB) Same as above, but for clubs. Clubs, are more-likely to have different “loyalty” affiliations and whilst their service may in- clude heritage; the primary purpose, will more likely be tar- geted at engagement for activities. 2. NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION (CLASS EDUCATION) Same as above, but for Education Service Providers. Educa- tion has special needs with consideration for access by stu- dents, and how we support their needs and the needs of educa- tional providers. Education facilities, need services that inter- act with the enterprise nature of their platforms. Beyond this, 38
  • 40. there are also opportunities pursuant to the reuse and remix- ing of content, for use in school-based work. The Systems are capable of assigning different license types. It seems to be the most practical way, that schools actually manage the “knowledge banking” information of students, in affiliation to parents. We have an interest in supporting the “life long learning” para- digm. Exploring ways this can be done, will be an interesting endeavor. With regard for the Educational Programs needed to improve the skills of seniors with computing technologies; as well as the many other inferred areas of knowledge; it is hoped that the delivery of these programs of education, can be done with the support or perhaps; collaboration, of adult edu- cation institutions who are able to provide a more meaningful, local support facility; enabling our association to focus more on professional development, rather than end-user training directly. Many of the systems being developed originate from Universi- ties in the United States, and elsewhere. It is hoped that the organisation will form partnerships with Universities to con- tinue this good work locally. 3.SMALL BUSINESS Small businesses have different needs than clubs and non- profits. Notably; the economics surrounding a small business, is that we hope to assist the organization in becoming a big- business. The Membership types will be split, on the basis of those who contribute back into the community; and those who don’t. 4.PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Professional Services are for developers and contributors of the projects; and critical individuals and organisations who as- sist in the production, support and development of solutions vended by the ACLA. Most of our membership classes will be based on jurisdic- tional law; which in australia means, In Australia - not over- seas. One of the Exceptions will be the Professional Services Membership type. The Reason for this; is that contributors to this platform will likely be based all over the globe. The best, of the Best, are not necessarily in Australia. Whilst it would be great to see them living happily in Mansfield Victoria; the reality is hope- fully much better, in that our work here in Australia; can be provided conduits for setting-up similar systems overseas. 5.CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP Corporate Memberships are treated differently, as to ensure the corporate interest does not override the interests of the as- sociations charter; or, the members. 39
  • 41. A Corporate Membership is highly priced. It is designed to ac- knowledge support; where support is given for our good work, without undue interferences. We are hoping that Corporate Sponsorships will support the Development of our technolo- gies. Specialised licensing agreements can certainly be drafted on the basis of considered membership agreements. Corporate Members hold a vote; no greater than the weight cast on the vote of any other member. 6.HONORARY MEMBERS Honorary Memberships are given to those who’ve provided outstanding levels of support to the organisation, its purpose and / or alternatively; towards its charter as an independent entity. These Memberships are subject to approval by the committee. MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS Members, subject to the terms of membership; are entitled to, 1. Information and participation in defining and supporting our works; 2. Discounts on Supply of equipment and services made avail- able by our Association 3. Loan Equipment and/or support for Production and other Professional Services. 4. Support Services for Digitization of Specialized products, On-Site Technology, and Training. 5. Invitations to Events, Meetings and other related services. PURPOSE OF STRUCTURE & MEMBERSHIPS Publicly Listed Commercial Organisations are governed by the vote of the shareholders. However the directors of these or- ganisations are also required to ensure their actions are more specifically focused upon the development of profits for the shareholders. This organisation is not profits centric; as a primary directive. Whilst economic sustainability and growth is certainly well within the parameters of the organisations charter; the over- riding cause, is that of public good and competent philan- thropy. As a means of organisational security, the principle concept is to use Membership, or the principles of democracy, to drive the organisation and its activities, Whilst we seek the best; our organisation will be focused upon growth of the organisation in a manner that is transparent, as best can be done, to the members; and that the focus of the or- ganisation is always put back to the interests of the members, in complying with the charter and how that is facilitated. A System of “voting” will be established when practical, that will enable digital voting on strategic queries. Whilst the com- mittee may be at liberty to ignore the results of the outcomes, key areas will need to be put to vote at members committee meetings; events, where all parties are able to participate. Throughout our start-up sequence, which will be evaluated as less than 1m turn-over, the organisation will develop the full procedural processes for management and the establishment of policies pursuant to the voting program of governance. 40
  • 42. TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW 1. We Build 2. We Test 3. We Develop a Centre of Excellence 4. We Support NFP organisations 5. We Protect the interests of our Account Holders. SECTION 2 Technology TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT We will orchestrate the development of Open-Source Technol- ogy solutions, in-order to ensure the platform itself, does not produce a lock-in environment for users; and, to lower the cost of development overall. The most significant counterpart to this body of work; is in the orchestration of people. The so- ciological aspects in how to form a collaborative environment where contributors work towards a common-goal, and are re- warded for contributing to the work. The critical building block, is the core Knowledge Banking Platform; with its ancil- lary applications - market release products - specified in this document. These deployment models (applications) will be developed in a way that can be easily styled for use by Account Holders & Historical Societies, Clubs and Small Business Op- erators. The Tourism and Club Event Applications are ex- pected to drive most of the growth-revenues in the short- term. TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS With regard to the technology solutions we provide, our focus will be in supporting the Non-Profit Sector. Where we engage in projects that are more commercial in nature, our invest- ments are channeled into the support of non-profit works and/or projects that have a civic purpose agenda. Research has shown that there are marked benefits in assist- ing with the distribution of hardware solutions for the non- profit market. Most non-profits are not tech-savvy. Licensing mechanisms especially, are difficult without significant exper- 41 Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNXW1lHXQ7s Sean Parker discussing the Future of the Social Web
  • 43. tise in the area. Costs for properly licensing non-profit ver- sions of software change, remarkably the cost of deployment. without this support, it is suggested that for many access to equipment will be out of reach for many organisations in Aus- tralia. Some of the more operational components of the technologies we develop; can provide other benefits to organisations; in- cluding the ability for nominated others; to provide remote support. This is a difficult area of service provision; as often, providing support can extend onerously. Where individuals who are not really interested in learning, decide rather - to make it someone else problem; things provided with good- intentions, can actually be made uneconomically viable. The Education unit of the business, will be looking at ways to create strategies, proceedures and opportunities to make sus- tainable business practices in a manner that can effectively support new users. From a technology position; the idea, is to make these systems as user-friendly as possible. The Back-end systems to the knowledge bank, do provide version-control functions. This in-turn, enables things to be “undeleted” (for example). In-order to make the transition to digital technology and digi- tal economic relevance available; it seems that supply of tech- nology will be a counterpart to the associations works. ONLINE INFRASTRUCTURE
 Throughout the Due-Diligence Phase, several infrastructure technologies have been identified as necessary components to the broader platform; the cost of single units, outside of scope for smaller organizations. Some of these types of services are simple; such as setting-up hosting environments; others get more technical, such as e- commerce functions for web-to-print, or low-cost data-back- up of preservation materials; or even, video analysis and re- lated services to improve records in collections, and the appli- cation of copyright. In Future, there are a multitude of other functions; including but not exclusive to, a production interface, that allows users to produce new materials, incorporating a range of 3rd party content and related references; in a way that can be easily li- censed by the user, or their distribution groups. 42
  • 44. MEDIA LAB 1. Advanced Digitisation Capabilities 2. Creative Digital Media Studio 3. Outdoor Broadcasting Capabilities 4. Employing Students - Engaged in Community development activities and Liberal Arts. SECTION 3 Media Lab DIGITISATION When digitising heritage libraries, it’s amazing how seniors, walk in the door talking about some historically significant as- set they’ve got sitting on a shelf or in a box. These assets are sometimes in professional and/or weird and wonderful for- mats. Formats that need specialised digitisation equipment. Formats that degrade overtime, whether or not their digitised. To support digitisation of public records stored in formats dif- ficult to digitize by local heritage societies and/or shires, need a place to go to be professionally processed at low-cost. The types of content formats include include; Broadcast Tapes, Motion Film and Microfishe. Sometimes newspapers are difficult to digitise also; and whilst these sorts of things could take a very long time; it is part of the objective, by the ACLA to figure out ways to make these processes easier to do, achievable an indeed done, and done properly. Oftentimes the equipment needed to digitize some particular objects is ex- pensive and difficult to obtain and maintain. In other-cases, equipment can be built to do the job effectively at low-cost, or perhaps in overall in consideration of “Total Cost of Owner- ship” (“TCO”). Beyond the more mechanical aspects; the requirements in terms of skills, in how to process these assets oftentimes also needs expertise. As the Centre, is established, it is suggested that the equipment needed to digitise these types of objects to preservation quality be included in the overall scope of work. 43 Mansfield Media Lab: by Tim Holborn - Uploaded on the 3rd may 2011 The Mansfield Media Lab is an important part of the Research Process undertaken developing the ACLA Plan.
  • 45. MEDIA PRODUCTION Heritage The Equipment needed for digitization is essentially produc- tion equipment. The better the production equipment, the more than can be done with historical records. In-terms of processing content; the job can be considered to be a nebulous task; “how long is a piece of string”, with regard to the process- ing mechanisms for restoring old footage. With presevation in mind; the most important part is the ac- quisition process; however, one this has been achieved, being able to get the buzz out of audio, or the cracks out of broken photos - is all part of the broader view, of preservation and Me- dia Production Skills. Working with historical societies, it is often the case that the operator says there is a somebody in town who knows more about that photo. The volunteer, then arranges to go speak to them about the asset, because they’ll know. Ideally, these types of events could be recorded; there could be a place, where interviews could be done; to record some of this information in peoples heads; make it available for later interpretation. Beyond the Heritage purposes; there are an array of other purposes, both of civic nature; and of community benefit. Local Media Production In the not-too-distant future, multi-media will be used much more readily as a news and communications format. The dis- tribution of this “ebook” is designed to demonstrate that con- cept. In a related; earlier project (an investment); I developed the ideas surrounding this project, through supporting a “thing” called “AusCivics”, in conjunction with another related project “The Mansfield ArmChair Cinema”. The Mansfield Armchair Cinema, is a community funded pro- ject; providing a Digital Cinema, to a very small town. It was financed by the local people; employing students through a School-Based Apprenticeship program, supported by the local High-School. AusCivics is a civics project, empowered with a commission from the governor general to call upon community leaders, in seeking to develop new methods to engage students and the community at large, with civics education. Through the course of supporting this work; numerous at- tempts were made to engage schools, so many failed. The problem, was that schools did not have as part of their core curricula; civics education. History, yes. English, yes. Digital Media? Sometimes. But not Civics. In-order to demonstrate some concepts; We developed a short-film project, called “Without Notice”. The Clip, available on the next page. 44
  • 46. The Without Notice project, showed that students can quickly pick-up the skills involved in producing content. Their advanced skills with computers; makes it easy to edu- cate those who are interested, in how to prepare, shoot and produce content. The project worked with students from the cinema. Their ca- pacity to be flexible, get involved and engage their community leaders (provided the opportunity) was demonstrated. As the video showed; there were not only skill-based opportu- nities provided to these students, but also notions of civic val- ues. Demonstrations of how our system of government actu- ally applies itself to the lives of the people. The Experience embodied by producing Without Notice; showed that the lack of local media, is not due to lack of inter- ets but rather lack of capacity. Given the opportunity, people will get involved with democ- racy, civics and community. The problem is giving them a voice. beyond that problem, is how to fund it. 45 The “Without Notice” Short, was shot by walking down the street; and asking people for their time. Their time, given freely for often a 20 minute or more interview. This is a short to that work. Without Notice: A Civics orientated, community engage- ment project. After taking Tane into the city, to interview his local politi- cal member - I interviewed him, to document the meaning of the experience - to him. Interview with Tane
  • 47. A “media-lab” is a multi-functional environment. It is near- impossible to do anything with half of the necessary equip- ment, but with all of the necessary equipment, or even 95% of it; all sorts of things are possible. One of the difficult things in any regional area; is creating events and opportunities; whilst figuring out a mechanism to do so, without making a significant loss. Music festivals, theat- rical productions and community events all face similar is- sues; how to ensure, the books balance. Through the use of this equipment, these events can be cap- tured and transmitted either live, or after the event as an ed- ited product. This in-turn provides opportunities for new reve- nues, whether they be gained through the application of li- censes, premium access, sale of media or even advertising. Many local businesses simply do not consider the idea of pro- ducing advertising. Whilst it is most likely true, that if the idea of producing advertising is brought into town; they’ll most likely try to get it free, or do it themselves (until a good reason to pay for it is understood) the first step of moving to- wards the use of multimedia for advertising, will require a pro- duction facility capable of providing valued services at low- cost. Using some basic tools, a few have been created. The Deck on High is a local restaurant. They’re advertisment, used in the local cinema and on the internet. 46 Music Festival - James Rayne The Deck on High Advertisement Deck On High
  • 48. Alpine Country Cottages provides accommodation. Their advertisement is used on their website, in association to accommodation bookings. Whilst the shorter-term purpose of advertising stock, is rela- tively nominal; if other services are to exist in future, that can be funded with advertising - theses content assets will need to exist, as a means to provide that advertising for programming, whether it be live or pre-recorded. Interactive TV is in the horizon. One of the core functions of these systems, will be to enable the use of local advertising, as part of the advertising pool used to fund programming. the use of this pool, is expected to be far-broader than simply In- teractive TV. A Major Advertising Company in Australia, “Yellow Pages”, has started already producing low-cost advertising solutions for businesses. Yellow-Pages, is not the only organisation looking seriously at this emerging sector. Whilst it is reasonable to suggest that these types of “urban” businesses will effectively service urban areas; it is question- able as to whether they’ll be able to effectively service regional areas. Regional Areas have a range of limiting factors; when it comes to growth, in relation to broadband related economic drivers. 1. Connectivity The Connectivity issues is significant. Business models devel- oped for urban areas, end-up causing a form of discriminatory action in regional areas. Many regional people, can only ob- tain internet connectivity using Mobile Telephone Networks. These networks often have poor-coverage; and even where cov- erage is available, the available plans offer only a few giga- bytes per month - for a cost that in urban areas, is equivalent to hundreds of gigs per month, for the same price. When considering the reduced income those living in regional areas normally face; this is simply an unfair business model, and one that is overall unsustainable for the Australian Mar- ket. 47 http://www.alpinecountrycottages.com.au/ Alpine Country Cottages
  • 49. Beyond the simple Connectivity Pricing problem; is also, avail- ability of technology. IP-STAR as an example, can provide low-cost satellite connec- tivity, capable of broadcasting from almost anywhere in Aus- tralia at a rate suitable even; for the transmission of High- Definition Television styled Programming. However, without significant support - this technology is simply unavailable. So connectivity issues are multi-factored, including issues sur- rounding Price, Coverage and Availability of suitable Technol- ogy. Part of our plan is to provide what is in effect, a lab environ- ment to test these issues with regard to how improvements to business models can be made. 2.Market Size and Critical Mass Regional areas have far less people in them; than urban areas. Therefore, the number of potential viewers of content is gener- ally significantly reduced. With the aggregation strategies of the past; bringing about changes to business models, which have in-turn, created cultural issues within large companies that exhibit “elitism”, it is difficult to argue with them that their current policy of going to a local cafe in Sydney, to meet with their friends who run some of the largest advertising ac- counts; is not an easier way for them to achieve their KPI’s within their role. Why indeed, would they want to goto the ex- pense and “hassle” of providing services into each and every community centre throughout Australia. Interestingly, It seems that this type of strategy is indeed failing companies in longer-term, non-kpi captured metrics. The Press is becoming less, and less relevant to readers. As the smaller pools of supporters, bring reduced revenues, re- duced vision and reduced readership. The problem at the moment seems more to be, that there’s a significant market gap - that’s not being supported by local businesses, but rather international giants, such as Google and Facebook. In-Turn, the ideas of journalism and its place, or perhaps role in supporting the underlying mechanisms of democracy con- tinue to degrade. These ideals; harbored by leading execu- tives, full of gusto, are difficult to change. More often than not; they’d look for a way to take, rather than share. A way to prop-up their ways, without consideration of the implications - at the end of the day, i’m not sure it actually harms them in anycase; their employed by one company, when things change and the money gets better - they’ll just move to the next com- pany. This area of media, needs in no insignificant measure; a level of social entrepreneurship to “shake things up”. This type of entrepreneurial behavior is supported overseas to a much greater extent. Fairly reasoned perhaps, due to population dif- ferences; these differences to not change the need to create more sustainable models. 48