Human sciences introduction no build

5,891 views

Published on

IB ToK Human Sciences

Published in: Education, Technology
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Contact Top Class IB Tutors for any assignment help: Email: ramprhr@gmail.com Website: www.topclassibtutors.com IB theory of knowledge (TOK) essay help tutors example sample Online Assignment Help/Tuition all over the world (100% guarantees for top class grades): Mail us or call us for any query: Email: ramprhr@gmail.com Website: www.topclassibtutors.com Ph: +91 9911918255 and +91 9918492994 The theory of knowledge (TOK) requirement is central to the educational philosophy of the Diploma Programme. It is a stated aim of TOK that students should become aware of the interpretative nature of knowledge, including personal ideological biases, regardless of whether, ultimately, these biases are retained, revised or rejected. In that sense ToK is the glue that binds the different academic components of the IB Diploma together. IB Tutor provides assignment writing help in all the IB subjects. 1 IB maths mathematics studies IA tutor help HL SL exploration extended essay example sample 2. IB physics IA labs extended essay help tutors example sample 3. IB chemistry IA labs extended essay help tutors example sample 4. IB Biology IA labs extended essay help tutors example sample 5. IB written task WT 1 & 2 help tutors example sample 6. IB Written Assignment WA 1 & 2 online help tutors example sample 7. IB English Extended Essay EE online help tutors example sample 8. IB English IOP IOC online help tutors example sample 9. IB theory of knowledge (TOK) essay help tutors example sample, TOK Presentation help guidance 10. IB economics IA commentary extended essay help tutors example sample eco 11. IB business management bm IA extended essay help tutors sample example 12. IB ITGS (information technology in a global society) project extended essay help tutors example sample 13. IB history geography IA extended essay help tutors example sample 14. IB Environmental systems & society ESS Lab Report IA Extended Essay EE Help Tutor Sample Example Online
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,891
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3,943
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
72
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Human sciences introduction no build

    1. 1. HumanSciences … or why Economics is hard and Physics is easy
    2. 2. Human Sciences Deal With... PEOPLE
    3. 3. Human Sciences
    4. 4. Write down 10 ways in which peoplediffer from a gram of tungsten
    5. 5. HUMAN SCIENCES Methods of gaining knowledge• How can we gather data on human behaviour?
    6. 6. Human Science So how do we study it?• Scientific method?• Asking questions?
    7. 7. Problems with experiments• In order to find out about people, we have to ask them or observe them.• Neither of these tasks is easy.
    8. 8. Scientific method Asking the right questions!• In devising experiments we are interrogating nature, and we should expect the view we form also depends on the questions we ask!
    9. 9. Scientific method• Assumptions - in order to make generalizations we must assume that all humans act the same. Is it fair to assume that humans are rational?
    10. 10. The rational human?• An elderly woman spent a leisurely shopping at the mall. Upon return to her vehicle, she found four strange males sitting in her car. Frightened, the woman dropped her shopping bags and drew her handgun. She told the men that if they did not get out of the car, she would shoot. The four men ran off quickly, whereupon the lady got into the car.• What do you think happened?
    11. 11. The rational human?• Her key, however, would not fit. The woman realized that her car was the identical one parked a few spaces down. She drove to the police department and reported the story. The officer on duty laughed hysterically and pointed to the other end of the counter where four pale men had reported a hijacking by a mean old lady; no charges were filed.• Is this what you imagined?
    12. 12. Or can this be considered rational?• Two young larcenists in Florida--14 and 15 to be exact--appeared before Judge Larry Seidlin after stealing their twenty-fifth car in just two short years. After the boys were released, they walked out of the courthouse and realized they did not have bus fare for a ride home. Promptly, the duo stole number twenty-six; they crashed the vehicle into a fence less than an hour later.
    13. 13. Hey Man, Stop Asking Me Questions• Try to think of 5 • Try to think of 5 questions which questions to which most people your answer to your would refuse to friends would differ answer. from your answer to• Try to think of 5 your parents. questions which people might answer with a lie.
    14. 14. I never wanted you to see me like this!The PANOPTICON wasproposed as a model prison byJeremy Bentham (1748-1832), aUtilitarian philosopher andtheorist of British legal reform.The Panopticon ("all-seeing")functioned as a round-the-clocksurveillance machine. Its designensured that no prisoner couldever see the inspector whoconducted surveillance from theprivileged central location withinthe radial configuration. Theprisoner could never know whenhe was being surveilled -- mentaluncertainty that in itself wouldprove to be a crucial instrumentof discipline.
    15. 15. Panopticon
    16. 16. ExperimentationIn groups of around 4, try to put an experiment togetherfor one of the following. List all the problems and possibleerrors that may arise:1) Compare how kind you are vs a rival school.2) Compare how intelligent you are vs the rival school3) Find out how people think local derelict land should beused4) Find out if people would pay extra tax to increasespending on health and education
    17. 17. Problems of Causation
    18. 18. Hume and Causation• On page 156 of Humes "Treatise of Human Nature", we find the paragraph that shook up causation so thoroughly that it has not recovered to this day. "Thus we remember to have seen that species of object we call *FLAME*, and to have felt that species of sensation we call *HEAT*. We likewise call to mind their constant conjunction in all past instances. Without any farther ceremony, we call the one *CAUSE* and the other *EFFECT*, and infer the existence of the one from that of the other."• Thus, causal connections according to Hume are product of observations. Causation is a learnable habit of the mind, almost as fictional as optical illusions
    19. 19. Long-lived living alone Single Cause & DirectionPut as many of the following list of words as Gaypossible into cause & effect pairs. Use an arrow toshow direction. You may use words more thanonce. Tall Good-looking Rich Musical Happy In prison Educated Canadian Exercise
    20. 20. Use cause and effect to explain the graphNo. of frogsin mygarden Yr1 Yr2 Yr3 Yr4 Yr5 Yr6 Yr 7 Yr8 Yr9 Yr 10 TIME
    21. 21. Human v Natural Sciences• The Human Sciences cannot experiment in the way that the Natural Sciences can.• The Human Sciences cannot repeat experiments.• The human scientist cannot isolate what his experiment refers to.• The human scientist cannot predict with a great deal of assurance.
    22. 22. Human v Natural Sciences• The hypotheses of the human scientist are not universal or precise.• The human scientist does not see ‘reality’ in the way that a natural scientist can.• The language of the human sciences is inherently vague.• The human scientists statements can have an effect on what she observes.
    23. 23. Human v Natural Sciences• “The human scientist cannot be indifferent to his subject matter.” Steven Pinker

    ×