TREATMENT OF MASTITIS  DURING LACTATION               Lotta Närhinen                        2011
OUTLINE• INTRODUCTION• BASIC FACTS• SOME DIFFERENT PATHOGENS AND  ABOUT PENICILLINE• TREATMENT• CONCLUSIONS• REFERENCES
INTRODUCTION• Intramammary infection is the most  common reason for using antimicrobials in  dairy cows• Cows have been tr...
BASIC FACTS• The bovine mammary gland is a difficult  target for antimicrobial treatment• Antimicrobial treatment creates ...
RESISTANCE TO PENICILLIN• Antimicrobial resistance amongst mastitis  pathogens has not yet emerged as a clinically  releva...
DIFFERENT PATHOGENSWhere to target antimicrobial therapy in clinical mastitis due to differentPathogens (Erskine 2003)    ...
TREATMENT IN PRACTISE• Treatment of mastitis should be targeted  towards the causative bacteria• Treatment protocols and d...
TREATMENT IN PRACTISE• A longer treatment improves cure  rates, and duration of treatment should  generally be extended  –...
CONCLUSIONS• Intramammary infection is the most  common disease in dairy cows     • When treating it, public health and th...
REFERENCES• Pyörälä S, University of Helsinki, Faculty  of Veterinary Medicine, Department of  Production Animal Medicine•...
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Treatment of mastitis during lactation

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Treatment of mastitis during lactation

  1. 1. TREATMENT OF MASTITIS DURING LACTATION Lotta Närhinen 2011
  2. 2. OUTLINE• INTRODUCTION• BASIC FACTS• SOME DIFFERENT PATHOGENS AND ABOUT PENICILLINE• TREATMENT• CONCLUSIONS• REFERENCES
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION• Intramammary infection is the most common reason for using antimicrobials in dairy cows• Cows have been treated the same way for over fifty years, but is it the best way?• The public health shouldn’t be ignored so more research is needed
  4. 4. BASIC FACTS• The bovine mammary gland is a difficult target for antimicrobial treatment• Antimicrobial treatment creates residues into milk• Residue avoidance is an important aspect of mastitis treatment• Another important aspect is that milk should not interfere with antimicrobial activity
  5. 5. RESISTANCE TO PENICILLIN• Antimicrobial resistance amongst mastitis pathogens has not yet emerged as a clinically relevant issue• Geographical regions may differ in this respect• The biggest problem is the widespread resistance of staphylococci to penicillin• Using a β-lactamase test for determining resistance to penicillin of staphylococci before treatment is recommended
  6. 6. DIFFERENT PATHOGENSWhere to target antimicrobial therapy in clinical mastitis due to differentPathogens (Erskine 2003) Milk/ducts Udder tissue CowStreptococcus +++ --- ---agalactlaeOther streptococci +++ + ---Staphylococcus + +++ ---aureusCoagulase- +++ --- ---negativestaphylococciArcanobacterium --- ++ +++pyogenesColiforms + -- +++
  7. 7. TREATMENT IN PRACTISE• Treatment of mastitis should be targeted towards the causative bacteria• Treatment protocols and drug selection for each farm should be made by veterinarians familiar with the farm
  8. 8. TREATMENT IN PRACTISE• A longer treatment improves cure rates, and duration of treatment should generally be extended – Clinical mastitis should be treated for at least three days – This recommended treatment duration is longer than label treatments in many countries
  9. 9. CONCLUSIONS• Intramammary infection is the most common disease in dairy cows • When treating it, public health and the effects on milk should be considered• The infection should be treated by a veterinarian who is familiar with the particular herd • The infection should be treated for at least three days and towards the causative bacteria
  10. 10. REFERENCES• Pyörälä S, University of Helsinki, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Production Animal Medicine• http://www.irishvetjournal.org/content/pdf/2 046-0481-62-S4-S40.pdf Thank you for your attention!

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