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0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
0135140560 pp10a
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0135140560 pp10a

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BSA105: Business English …

BSA105: Business English
Section 10: Document Design, Graphics, and Multimedia

Yavapai College
Lindsay Henning
Associate Professor

Published in: Education
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  • 1. Pearson Business Reference and Writer’s Handbook Section Ten Document Design, Graphics, and Multimedia
  • 2. This section provides <ul><li>Guidelines for using formatting, graphics, and other visual elements to achieve maximum readability and ease of use for print and multimedia communications. </li></ul>
  • 3. Objectives <ul><li>Use variations in type, page layout, and use of visuals to create attractive, readable printed documents </li></ul><ul><li>Organize information with readability and use of visual elements in mind </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate text, tables, and visuals to enhance readability and accessibility for the reader </li></ul>
  • 4. Additional objectives <ul><li>Label tables, graphs, charts, and other graphics using captions, footnotes, source notes, and credits as needed </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate basic knowledge of creating multimedia slide presentations and Web pages that achieve the writer’s purpose and meet the needs of the intended audience </li></ul>
  • 5. Document Design <ul><li>The goal is to make printed text inviting to the reader </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Appears easy to read </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Appears interesting to the reader </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shows that the writer cared to produce quality work </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. Create readability and visual appeal with <ul><li>Standard type fonts </li></ul><ul><li>Variations in type to denote structure </li></ul><ul><li>Short blocks of text </li></ul><ul><li>Generous use of white space </li></ul><ul><li>Headings to break up text </li></ul><ul><li>Bulleted and numbered lists </li></ul><ul><li>Proper placement and use of graphics </li></ul>
  • 7. Selection of type font <ul><li>Consider </li></ul><ul><ul><li>size </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>style </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>color </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Serif vs. sans serif </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This is serif </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This is sans serif </li></ul></ul>
  • 8. Font style variations <ul><li>Regular (roman) </li></ul><ul><li>Italic </li></ul><ul><li>Boldface </li></ul><ul><li>Boldface italic </li></ul><ul><li>ALL CAPS </li></ul><ul><li>Cap Lowercase </li></ul><ul><li>Underlined </li></ul>
  • 9. Standard fonts for business documents <ul><li>12-point for text copy </li></ul><ul><li>11- or 12-point for page numbers </li></ul><ul><li>14- to 16-point for display headings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(may be centered or flush left) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>12 to 14 point for regular headings </li></ul><ul><li>9 or 10 point for footnotes </li></ul>
  • 10. Body text <ul><li>Use serif fonts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Times (New) Roman, 12 point, is recommended for business documents. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use standard type sizes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>12-point type for routine documents </li></ul></ul>
  • 11. Headings <ul><li>Use sans serif fonts for main headings </li></ul><ul><li>Vary font size to indicate levels of headings </li></ul><ul><li>Vary font style as needed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use text font for subheadings </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. Page layout <ul><li>A good page layout: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is appealing to the eye on first glance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps readers understand organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps readers see how each part relates to the whole </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Makes the information easy to read and understand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps readers find information quickly. </li></ul></ul>
  • 13. Headings <ul><li>Headings provide a roadmap that guides the reader through the organization of a document. </li></ul><ul><li>Wording should be precise and consistently styled. </li></ul><ul><li>Each level of heading should be typed in consistent format and have parallel wording. </li></ul>
  • 14. Body text <ul><li>Balance text and white space on the page. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid long blocks of text. </li></ul><ul><li>Use boxes, lists, graphics to break up text. </li></ul><ul><li>Use standard margins and justification. </li></ul><ul><li>For emphasis you may also use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>rules and borders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>shading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>variation in font color, size, and style </li></ul></ul>
  • 15. Graphics <ul><li>Add clarity and interest </li></ul><ul><li>Should be relevant to the topic and communicate essential information </li></ul><ul><li>Should be labeled and referenced in the text </li></ul><ul><li>Should be placed as close as possible to the first reference </li></ul>
  • 16. Graphics include <ul><li>Charts </li></ul><ul><li>Graphs </li></ul><ul><li>Photographs </li></ul><ul><li>Diagrams </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrations (drawings) </li></ul><ul><li>Tables may also include graphics </li></ul>
  • 17. Uses for graphics <ul><li>Bar graph shows the relationship between two or more sets of data </li></ul><ul><li>Series Sales, 2009 </li></ul>
  • 18. <ul><li>Line graphs shows the relationship of information or data to a time line. </li></ul><ul><li>Sales 2007-2010 </li></ul>
  • 19. <ul><li>Pie graph: presents simple data for comparison, such as percentages of a whole. </li></ul>
  • 20. <ul><li>Organization charts depict the hierarchy of items—usually positions in an organization. </li></ul>
  • 21. Multimedia <ul><li>Consider variations in reader’s needs/expectations. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the five-step writing process. </li></ul>
  • 22. Visual perception of readers <ul><li>Print - reads from left to right and top to bottom. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide - focuses on the center of the screen first. </li></ul><ul><li>Web page - focuses on whatever is designed to be the central focal point. </li></ul>
  • 23. Sequence <ul><li>Print - Designed to be read in sequence at the reader’s pace. </li></ul><ul><li>Slides - Designed to be viewed in sequence at the presenter’s pace. </li></ul><ul><li>Web pages - Designed to be read at whatever pace and sequence the reader chooses. </li></ul>
  • 24. Design expectations <ul><li>Documents - familiar elements—text sections, headings, page numbers, headers and footers, graphics </li></ul><ul><li>Slides - follow a typical format—e.g., titles and bulleted points or graphics. </li></ul><ul><li>Web pages - navigational tools that allow the user to move around the site: menus, links, buttons, graphics </li></ul>
  • 25. Using graphics and text effectively <ul><li>The design and format of text and graphics are essential to quality. Refer to the guidelines in the Pearson Business Reference and Writer’s Handbook whenever you need to produce document-based or multimedia communications. </li></ul>

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