Mod 7 dev others

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Mod 7 dev others

  1. 1. Developing Others LFGSM 5120 Session #7
  2. 2. Premise for Developing Others Leadership from the Inside Out – Kevin Cashman. First EI Internal Mastery (self awareness and self management), Then EI External Mastery (awareness of others’ needs and relationship management). Being Mindful, Resonant & Authentic.
  3. 3. Revisiting Mindfulness, as a prerequisite for developing others Moment-to-moment awareness Uses all available clues ̶ Emotions ̶ Thoughts ̶ Physicality ̶ Ethical judgments Being resilient – learning from failure
  4. 4. How Resonant are you? Do you speak the language of a Resonant Leader? ̶ Passion, emotionally charged, vulnerability, risk, personal vision ̶ Authentic relationships, integrity, accountability, empowerment* What Primal Leadership skills are you aware of? ̶ EI ̶ Johari Window Exposure vs. Feedback *Primal Leadership, Ch. 11
  5. 5. How Authentic Are You? Teleometrics Communications Assessment? ̶ With employees? ̶ With colleagues? ̶ With supervisors? Johari Window ̶ Arena: Known by self & others ̶ Blindspot: Unknown by/Known by others ̶ Façade: Known by self/Unknown by others ̶ Unknown: Unknown by self & others
  6. 6. Johari Window OPEN ARENA FACADE UNKNOWN Known by Others Not known by Others Known to Self Not known by self Exposure Feedback BLIND SPOT
  7. 7. Your Communications Scores Reflect your conscious and unconscious openness to others. Reflect your willingness to solicit and accept feedback from others. Ideally should be balanced between “exposure” and “feedback”.
  8. 8. Johari Type A: Impersonal OPEN ARENA BLIND SPOT FACADE Known by Others Not known by Others Known to Self Not known by self Exposure Feedback UNKNOWN
  9. 9. Johari Type B: Quasi-Supportive OPEN ARENA BLIND SPOT Known by Others Not known by Others Known to Self Not known by self Exposure Feedback FACADE UNKNOWN
  10. 10. Johari Type C: Ego-Striving OPEN ARENA Known by Others Not known by Others Known to Self Not known by self Exposure Feedback UNKNOWNFACADE BLIND SPOT
  11. 11. Johari Type D: Candid Openness OPEN ARENA Known by Others Not known by Others Known to Self Not known by self Exposure Feedback UNKNOWNFACADE BLIND SPOT
  12. 12. Johari Window Interpretation Johari Window dynamics are…significantly related to management style… …interpersonal competence is directly bound to managerial achievement. The larger the Arena, the more effective relationships are (quantity). The shape of the Arena suggests the feelings others have in your relationship (quality). Women tend to share less with colleagues than men.
  13. 13. DEVELOPING TEAMS
  14. 14. What is a Team?  A team is a small number of people with complementary skills who are committed to a common purpose, performance goals, and approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable. - The Wisdom of Teams, Katzenbach & Smith
  15. 15. Four Team Roles  SPONSOR  TEAM COACH  TEAM LEADER  TEAM MEMBER  Gives authority, resources  Mentors, coaches  Sets goals, vision, leads  Fosters trust, cooperation
  16. 16. Team Success Factors  Clear shared Vision.  Clearly defined, measurable goals.  Clear processes.  Clear high standards.  Shared resources.  Mutual regard & trust.  Forthrightness.  Complementary member skills & fit.  Creative problem- solving.  Disciplined execution.  Flexibility.  Recognition.  Continuous skill building.
  17. 17. REVISITING SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP & TUCKMAN MODEL OF TEAM PERFORMANCE
  18. 18. Team Stages 1. Forming 2. Storming 3. Norming 4. Performing 5. Adjourning (if project)
  19. 19. Remember Situational Leadership? S1 High Directive and High Supportive Behavior S2 High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior S3 S4 High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior D3/2 D2/3 D3 D2 D3/4 D2/1 D4/3 D1/2 D4 D1 SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR DIRECTIVE BEHAVIORlow high high D4 D3 D2 D1 high lowmoderate DEVELOPED DEVELOPING Development Level of Individual Source: Situational Leadership, Ken Blanchard
  20. 20. Situational Leadership applies to teams Team Identity IndividualismAssertion Forming Members start to show their true colors. Team can fall apart or limp along. Storming Team identity begins to form. Members become comfortable with each other. Norming Performing Team just formed. Members don’t know how to act around each other. The team is all that matters! The team is a part of the member’s identity. High Low High Low
  21. 21. FORMING : Style 1 – Directing SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR DIRECTIVE BEHAVIORlow high high High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior S1 Source: Situational Leadership, Ken Blanchard
  22. 22. Team Coaching Plan: FORMING - Directing Establish team purpose & goals, telling & selling VISION & VALUES. Establish sponsorship support resources. Select complementary skill sets. Get team commitment on purpose, goals. Plan bonding activities, ideally around work and play.
  23. 23. Member Behaviors FORMING - Directing  Member Behaviors Understanding goals & tasks. Understanding organization & culture. Determining acceptable team behavior. Voice complaints about organization & task barriers. Possibly fail to listen. May not be productive. Feel cautious, fearful, suspicious, anxious, excited, high expectations. Wrestling with degree of commitment. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual
  24. 24. Member Concerns FORMING - Directing  Member Concerns Who am I in this group? Who are my teammates? Will I be accepted? What is my role? What tasks will I have? Will I be capable? Do I trust the leader? Will the leader value me? Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual
  25. 25. Leader Strategies FORMING - Directing Provide structure by holding regular meetings & allowing time for orientation, task, & role clarification. Encourage participation by all, domination by none. Facilitate learning about one another’s expertise & preferred working modes. Share or build vision together. Share timely, relevant information, preferably in writing. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual
  26. 26. Leader Strategies FORMING - Directing  Encourage members to ask questions of you & each other.  Develop member skills & provide feedback.  Affirm success goals.  Develop timelines, plans, policies & procedures.  Supervise closely. Direct often. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual
  27. 27. SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR DIRECTIVE BEHAVIORlow high high S2 High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior S1 High Directive and High Supportive Behavior Source: Situational Leadership, Ken Blanchard STORMING: Style 2 – Coaching
  28. 28. Conflict stage ̶ Members assert with other members, pressing agendas, expressing concerns. ̶ Members may “let down their guard”, and individual needs are communicated. Resistance to group influence; intra-group conflict ̶ May overtly or covertly challenge leader. Dissonant response to task requirements ̶ Members may push back and react to to-do’s. Team Stage STORMING - Coaching
  29. 29. • Resolution of goals & team ROLES, telling, selling, participating. • Coaching individuals and team. • Reinforce complementary interactions. • Manage confrontations. • Mentor strengths with weaknesses – matching pairs. • Maintain regular bonding activities. Team Coaching Plan STORMING - Coaching
  30. 30.  Offer suggestions & proposals in an attempt to gain influence.  Test & challenge the leader.  May avoid tasks, not focus on big picture.  Form subgroups & coalitions, with possible conflict among them.  Judge & evaluate one another and the leader.  Shoot down ideas. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Member Behaviors STORMING - Coaching
  31. 31.  Establish pecking order.  Fail to learn about one another, skills, or resources.  Establish unrealistic goals.  Compete & defend.  Rely solely on their own personal & professional experience. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Member Behaviors STORMING - Coaching
  32. 32.  How much autonomy will I have?  How much influence will I have?  What is my place in the pecking order?  Whom do I like? Who likes me? (personal level)  Do I have support? (Issues level)  Why is progress so slow? Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Member Concerns STORMING - Coaching
  33. 33.  Establish a supportive climate.  Engage in joint problem-solving.  Establish how the team vents frustration & shares problems.  Establish norms for expression of different viewpoints.  Share decision-making responsibility.  Set tasks & time frames.  Communicate policies & procedures.  Provide members with resources needed to do their jobs. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Leader Strategies STORMING - Coaching
  34. 34. Most difficult time for the leader!  Help members listen to each other & stop supporting personal positions.  Check progress & attitudes.  Keep vision & goals as the focus.  Explain your decisions clearly to all team members.  Foster play time to bond.  Re-define roles & responsibilities.  Remove the lightweights & fire the terrorists. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Leader Strategies STORMING - Coaching
  35. 35. SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR DIRECTIVE BEHAVIORlow high high S2 High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior S3 High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior S1 High Directive and High Supportive Behavior Source: Situational Leadership, Ken Blanchard NORMING: Style 3 – Supporting
  36. 36. • Determine team identity consistent with purpose & goals, participating & delegating. • Open discussion of what works and what doesn’t within team dynamics. • Heal wounds. Set boundaries. • Institutionalize team RULES & PERFORMANCE NORMS. • Open discussion of what needs & skills the team still lacks to accomplish goals. • Maintain bonding activities. Team Coaching Plan NORMING - Supporting
  37. 37. Group cohesion starts, norms develop ̶ Group begins to feel “like an old shoe” ̶ Group habits form: coffee breaks, lunch Members start to like the group & have positive feelings; assumption of team roles ̶ Team starts to develop its own identity ̶ Team members able to resolve conflicts on their own Open exchanges of relevant interpretations; personal opinions are expressed openly ̶ Feelings of openness & commitment to each other ̶ Information sharing is prevalent Team Behaviors NORMING - Supporting
  38. 38.  May disagree with the leader, with broad support.  May not challenge one another as much as the leader would like.  Pay attention to group norms & team boundaries.  Express emotions constructively.  Attempt to achieve harmony and avoid conflict.  Accept others.  Find their niche.  Model moderate progress toward goals.  Know each other on a personal level.  Laugh together, have fun. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Member Behaviors NORMING - Supporting
  39. 39.  How close should I be to other team members?  Can we accomplish our tasks successfully?  How do we compare to other teams?  What is my relationship to the leader?  Am I being accepted as a member of the group? Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Member Concerns NORMING - Supporting
  40. 40.  Talk openly about your own issues & concerns.  Build supportive relationships.  Give & request constructive positive & negative feedback in the group.  Involve all members in decision-making & problem- solving & share responsibility.  Encourage differences of opinion.  Share leadership. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Leader Strategies NORMING - Supporting
  41. 41.  Delegate as much as the members can handle.  Help members.  Recognize personal & group accomplishments.  Practice active listening.  Model confronting, challenging & dealing with conflict.  Facilitate & support task accomplishment. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Leader Strategies NORMING - Supporting
  42. 42. S1 SUPPORTIVEBEHAVIOR DIRECTIVE BEHAVIORlow high high High Directive and High Supportive Behavior S2 High Supportive and Low Directive Behavior S3 S4 High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior Low Supportive and Low Directive Behavior Source: Situational Leadership, Ken Blanchard PERFORMING: Style 4 – Delegating
  43. 43. • Acknowledge accomplishments with team LEARNINGS. • Reward, promote, publicize. • Add stretch goals consistent with purpose. • MANAGE BOUNDARIES. • Delegate, trust, provide feedback. • Ensure bonding activities are 100% inclusive. Team Coaching Plan: PERFORMING - Delegating
  44. 44.  The team is paramount with synergy! Members love being on the team & sacrifice personal needs to make team successful.  Member roles become flexible & fully functional Members fulfill other roles as required. Members pull their weight and hold themselves accountable.  Group energy channeled into tasks; problems are overcome by all Highly constructive & productive. Team Behaviors: PERFORMING - Delegating
  45. 45. Have clear roles & make distinctive contributions. Take the initiative & accept one another’s initiative. Hold open discussions & accept differences among members & modes of operation. Challenge one another, leading to creative problem- solving. Seek feedback from others & from the leader to improve performance. Trust self & each other. Produce at a high level. Help each other achieve. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Member Behaviors: PERFORMING - Delegating
  46. 46. Concerns of earlier stages have been resolved. Members are not pushing individual concerns. Members focused on the team & the team’s success. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual Member Concerns: PERFORMING - Delegating
  47. 47. Leader Strategies PERFORMING - Delegating Set goals that are challenging. Foster open, honest communication. Look for new team opportunities. Foster active listening, group problem-solving, & shared leadership. Foster productive dialogue & diverse viewpoints. Develop team self-assessments. Acknowledge member’s contributions. Develop members to through new assignments & feedback. Celebrate success & express gratitude. Provide opportunities for fun & socializing. Source: AAUW Educational Foundation, Community Coalitions Manual
  48. 48. ADJOURNING  Sad about disbanding a performing team - preserve feelings of being a part of something special.  Self-reflection & good memories.  Relationships established in norming and/or performing stage will remain intact after team disbands.
  49. 49. LEADING TEAMS Using D.i.S.C.
  50. 50. Exercise: Reading Your Team or Organization Recall… ̶ When significant change happened. ̶ When people and tasks clashed. ̶ How people responded and acted. Answer: ̶ What leader behaviors are modeled? ̶ What behaviors are rewarded? ̶ What behaviors are criticized? Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  51. 51. Signs of a D Organization Models ̶ Competitive “Warriors”, inside & outside ̶ Quick decisions ̶ Love of challenges ̶ Directness ̶ Forcefulness Rewards ̶ Independence ̶ Winning ̶ Decisiveness ̶ Speed ̶ Results ̶ Status Criticizes ̶ Softness, weakness ̶ Nitpicking ̶ Foot-dragging Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  52. 52. Signs of a i Organization Models ̶ “Conciliators, Collaborators” ̶ Relationships important ̶ Lots of interaction and meetings ̶ Expression of thoughts & feelings ̶ Optimism ̶ Belief that work can be fun ̶ Constant change Rewards ̶ Creativity ̶ Enthusiasm ̶ Passion Criticizes ̶ Too much emphasis on research, rules, or regulation ̶ Dullness ̶ Group being ignored, excluded, marginalized ̶ Insensitivity Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  53. 53. Signs of a S Organization Models ̶ “Administrators” ̶ Stability ̶ Security ̶ Harmony ̶ Teamwork and joint projects ̶ Pleasant, relaxed atmosphere Rewards ̶ Conformity ̶ Cooperation ̶ Helpfulness ̶ Loyalty Criticizes ̶ Disruptiveness ̶ Pushiness ̶ “Going for the jugular” ̶ Strong individualism Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  54. 54. Signs of a C Organization Models ̶ “Watchmakers” ̶ High standards ̶ Careful analysis ̶ Weighing of pros & cons ̶ Tact ̶ Diplomacy  Rewards Accuracy Completeness Attention to detail On-time performance Dependability  Criticizes Mistakes Sloppiness Lateness Spotty research Too much enthusiasm Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  55. 55. Meeting the Organization’s Needs A D organization needs to achieve results An i organization needs variety and recognition An S organization needs stability and close relationships A C organization needs accuracy and consistency What is your highest DiSC dimension? How does it compare to your organization’s style? ̶ If you match styles, how do you perceive the team? ̶ If you don’t have the same style, is this why you may feel frustrated at times? Don’t feel like you fit in? Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  56. 56. In a D Organization If you are a D ̶ Be yourself. Give it all you’ve got. Expect conflict. If you are an i ̶ Co. values your energy & enthusiasm. Your ideas are implemented fast. Expect to not be recognized for your great work, as the Co. expects it. If you are an S ̶ Co. values your consistency. Co. may feel cold, unstable, and harsh. Others may come to you for a sympathetic ear. If you are a C ̶ Co. values your precision. Co. may “push on” without looking deeper into things. You drive others crazy when you stop forward motion. Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  57. 57. In an i Organization If you are a D ̶ Coworkers may share in your credit of your work. You may feel a lack of power, prestige, and authority. You become impatient in long meetings. If you are an i ̶ You might not want to go home because you love being here. If you are an S ̶ The org will embrace change faster than you. You’ll be appreciated for your work. Teamwork is highly valued. If you are a C ̶ You’ll be bothered by the lack of rules & guidelines. You are on your own with planning. Be brief but polite in meetings. Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  58. 58. In an S Organization  If you are a D The predictable, stable, orderly Co. is dull and unchallenging. People think you are pushy and impatient. Relax or move on to another group.  If you are an i High trust in Co. No excitement. You could try to make the team fun to be in.  If you are an S You enjoy the teamwork and predictability. Opportunities for growth may be slow.  If you are a C You are troubled by the relaxed standards, lack of analysis, and loosely defined performance expectations, but you enjoy the consistent and predictable environment, and the patient helpfulness of others. Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  59. 59. In a C Organization If you are a D ̶ The double-checking and deep analysis frustrates you. You want faster decisions and progress. You know where you stand. If you are an i ̶ Bored by repetitious assignments and continuous attention to details. Work on a systemic process to get your ideas into action. If you are an S ̶ Feel at ease, but will be lonely. Co. expects you to work alone, and will be critical of you if you are not rigorous in your thinking. If you are a C ̶ Businesslike Co. values quality and dependability. Conflict is rare. You feel “at home”. Source: The 4-Dimensional Manager, Julie Straw
  60. 60. Dynamics of Team Development  Adding & losing just 1 new member can bring existing team back to forming stage.  Can fluctuate back & forth between stages at any time.  The more face time, the quicker the stage transition occurs.  No set or average time for transitions.  No clear demarcation; must rely on your own judgment of where you are.
  61. 61. Team Development & Work Output FORMING teams can produce good work & may think that they are “performing”. STORMING teams can still produce good work BUT some members have issues with some members of the team. ̶ Best & hardest thing to do is to resolve those issues. NORMING teams produce good work & feel good about all team members. PERFORMING teams produce great work & everyone feels great about all team members.
  62. 62. Summary  Stages of team development are predictable and sequential.  Do not avoid or circumvent each stage. A team must work through each stage to grow & build trust in each other & to bond the team members together.  As the leader, you must help the team get to the performing stage quickly.
  63. 63. Exercise: Identify Team Dynamics: Remember the Titans  Call out team stage!  Stop for questions.  Identify regression to earlier or unresolved stage.  Identify unresolved relationship issues or conflicts between members.

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