Leadership

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Leadership

  1. 1. We must become the change we want to see.<br />- Mahatma Gandhi <br />
  2. 2. What is Leadership?<br />Leadership is the ability to: “express a vision, influence others to achieve results, enable others, encourage cooperation, and be an example.”<br />
  3. 3. Successful leaders are committed to “creating a world to which people want to belong”. <br />Successful leadership involves managing relationships and communicating within a team to move towards a specific goal.<br />
  4. 4. Leadership is not the same thing as management. <br />Management is “getting things done through others.” <br />
  5. 5. Leadership is “getting others to want to do things.” <br />Leadership is intimately tied up with motivating and influencing others.<br />
  6. 6. A good deal of leadership can come from people who are not formal leaders. <br />
  7. 7. Leading is the result of using one’s role and leadership ability to influence others in some way. <br />
  8. 8. True leaders are not “bosses” or “commanders”. <br />Instead of power, true leadership comes from influence, congruence and integrity.<br />
  9. 9. Strengthening your leadership ability can help you improve your capacity to achieve results and reach personal or organizational outcomes.<br />
  10. 10. Leadership Field Guide Table of Contents<br />Model the Way aka Walk the Talk<br />Inspire with Your Vision of the Future<br />Challenge the Process – Change/Grow/Improve<br />Enable Others to Act – Empower/Collaborate<br />Encourage the Heart – Celebrate!<br />
  11. 11. Model the Way <br />First, find your voice by clarifying and communicating your personal values<br />Then, set the example by aligning your actions with your values<br />Walk the Talk!<br />
  12. 12. Do What You Say<br />Be consistent in how you handle critical incidents, how you spend your time, how you recognize and reward, and the stories you tell to build the culture.<br />Model the Way<br />
  13. 13. Bea Professional <br />Be loyal to the organization, perform selfless service, take personal responsibility. <br />Model the Way<br />
  14. 14. Be a professional who possess good character traits <br />Honesty, competence, candor, commitment, integrity, courage, straightforwardness, imagination. <br />
  15. 15. Be a professional who possess good character traits <br />Integrity is measured by what you do when no one is watching you. <br />Don’t compromise.<br />No one can take your integrity—you have to give it away. <br />Don’t –it’s your most prized possession.<br />
  16. 16. Model the Way<br />Focus on Excellence<br />Focus on excellence and those around you will follow suit.<br />
  17. 17. Focus on Excellence<br />Leaders have GRIT <br />Guts<br />Resilience<br />Intensity<br />Tenacity<br />
  18. 18. Focus on Excellence<br />Winners contribute to their surroundings; losers complain about them. <br />Winners are problem solvers; losers are problem identifiers. <br />Be a winner.<br />
  19. 19. Focus on Excellence<br />Winners forget they’re in a race – they just love to run.<br />Enthusiasm is like a rumor—it spreads fast.<br />Don’t rationalize failure. “Can Do.” <br />
  20. 20. Focus on Excellence<br />Great leaders leave a legacy of excellence in the hearts, minds, and souls of the people they lead.<br />They are trustworthy, earn our respect, and genuinely care about us. <br />
  21. 21. Focus on Excellence<br />Their legacy is the example of excellence that shapes us. <br />They touch our souls. <br />They never ask for anything in return. <br />They embody what it means to be a leader.<br />
  22. 22. Focus on Excellence<br />Many leaders get great results, but obtaining great results is not proof of great leadership. <br />For the great leader, great results are merely a byproduct of bringing out the best in others. <br />Such leaders are personal and national treasures. <br />Cultivate them. <br />
  23. 23. Model the Way<br />Tend your own garden<br />Make your functional area the best place it can possibly be. <br />Focus your talents and energies on areas you can directly influence and control. <br />
  24. 24. Tend your own garden<br />Make life better and more meaningful for those around you. <br />Be committed to excellence in every facet of existence.<br />
  25. 25. Tend your own garden<br />Pick your battles… <br />Beyond our area of control is another area, the area of influence, which we do not control but which we can help shape. <br />Events in the area of influence affect our gardens, but events we control in our gardens can also affect the area of influence.<br />
  26. 26. Tend your own garden<br />Those who tend their gardens discover that excellence is infectious. <br />People want to be on winning teams, and they want to make their teams winners. <br />Engaging in petty rivalries and jealousies is counterproductive.<br />
  27. 27. Model the Way<br />Be an Expert in the Basics<br />Great leaders are great teachers.<br />Your mark on your profession is the quality of the junior leaders who follow you.<br />
  28. 28. Be an Expert in the Basics<br />People expect their leaders to be experts in the basics. <br />
  29. 29. Be an Expert in the Basics<br />When leaders coach, they generate confidence among their subordinates. <br />Leaders learn a great deal about their peoples’ strengths and weaknesses while teaching the basics to them. <br />
  30. 30. Be an Expert in the Basics<br />As the leader coaches, the employees get to understand the standards that the leader expects in daily operations.<br />
  31. 31. Be an Expert in the Basics<br />Set high standards and demand compliance. <br />People appreciate high standards that are uniformly enforced.<br />
  32. 32. Be an Expert in the Basics<br />Never pass over a mistake.<br />If you do, you have set a new standard.<br />
  33. 33. Be an Expert in the Basics<br />Leaders must be visible, share hardships, and be the best. <br />Being with your employees sets a great example and demonstrates that you are a leader who cares.<br />
  34. 34. Model the Way<br />Be Trustworthy<br />The foundation of every healthy relationship is trust. <br />
  35. 35. Be Trustworthy<br />Relationships usually fail because of an actual or perceived breach of trust. <br />
  36. 36. Be Trustworthy<br />A leader must earn trust. <br />Good leaders are worthy of trust. <br />
  37. 37. Be Trustworthy<br />Good leaders earn trust through:<br />Good character and professional competence <br />Creating meaningful goals that generate excitement and coherent plans to meet those goals <br />Sound and timely decisions <br />Setting the example<br />Uplifting those around them to be better<br />Caring about others and treating them with respect <br />Good Leaders do the right thing.<br />
  38. 38. Be Trustworthy<br />Trust, which is the foundation of morale, is the first principle of leadership and the emotion that holds an organization together. <br />Trust is the genesis of faith in oneself, one’s co-workers, one’s leaders, and one’s team.<br />
  39. 39. Be Trustworthy<br />Mutual trust fosters initiative and instills a greater sense of responsibility. <br />People who trust one another share a bond of faith and understanding. <br />
  40. 40. Be Trustworthy<br />Leaders who trust their subordinates can loosen the reins and unleash creative energies. <br />Mutual trust in competence, discipline, character, and sound judgment is a requirement for independent initiative.<br />
  41. 41. Be Trustworthy<br />The best leaders use the principle of trust to guide their actions and decisions. <br />Trustworthy leaders create high-performing units that have superb morale.<br />
  42. 42. Model the Way<br />Grow Through Feedback<br />Feedback is a dialogue among professionals to improve the organization. <br />Good Leaders get feedback from subordinates.<br />
  43. 43. Grow Through Feedback<br />Subordinates will only tell you the full truth if:<br />They know you are genuine <br />They know disagreement does not equal disrespect <br />They see you take action on their feedback <br />They know that what they say is not going to be held against them<br />
  44. 44. Grow Through Feedback<br />Give feedback on subordinates’ feedback. <br />Let them know when you implement one of their ideas, and tell them how the idea has improved the unit. <br />
  45. 45. Grow Through Feedback<br />A good leader has the courage and confidence to be humble, listen to others, set the example, and foster healthy disagreement and the exchange of ideas and insights.<br />
  46. 46. Inspire a Shared Vision<br />Envision the future by imagining exciting and inspiring possibilities<br />A great Leader inspires excited and motivated people to reach for goals which they may not have even dared to dream about on their own.<br />
  47. 47. Envision the future by imagining exciting and inspiring possibilities<br />Leaders passionately believe that they can make a difference. <br />They have a desire to make something happen, to change the way things are, to create something that’s never existed before. <br />
  48. 48. Envision the future by imagining exciting and inspiring possibilities<br />Leaders envision the future. <br />A vision is a mental picture of what tomorrow will be like. <br />It expresses our highest standards and values. <br />It sets us apart and makes us feel special. <br />It spans years of time and keeps us focused on the future. <br />And, it must appeal to all who have a stake in it.<br />
  49. 49. Inspire a Shared Vision<br />Enlist support of others in a common vision by appealing to shared aspirations<br />However, having a vision of the future isn’t enough. <br />Others must be able to see themselves in that future.<br />
  50. 50. Enlist support of others in a common vision by appealing to shared aspirations<br />Leaders know what motivates their constituents. <br />They forge a unity of purpose by showing constituents how the vision can meet their needs and serve the common good. <br />
  51. 51. Enlist support of others in a common vision by appealing to shared aspirations<br />Leaders are personally convinced of the value of the vision and share it with genuine passion and conviction. <br />Enthusiasm is catching. <br />It uplifts people’s spirits.<br />
  52. 52. Inspire a Shared Vision<br />“The very essence of leadership is that you have to have a vision. It's got to be a vision you articulate clearly and forcefully on every occasion.” <br />— Theodore Hesburgh, President of the University of Notre Dame<br />
  53. 53. Challenge the Process<br />Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />Exemplary leaders are proactive – they seize the initiative. <br />
  54. 54. Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />Leadership and innovation are nearly synonymous. <br />
  55. 55. Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />Leaders know that people will not change unless they can see how a new policy, process, or program fits with their personal needs. <br />Leaders find ways to make the work of change intrinsically motivating to their constituents.<br />
  56. 56. Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />Because new and innovative ideas often originate outside the organization – they come from customers, research labs, or other outside sources – leaders use their “outsight” – their ability to perceive external realities – to constantly survey the landscape of technology, politics, economics, demographics, art, religion, and society. <br />
  57. 57. Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />Leaders are open to receiving ideas from anyone and anywhere.<br />
  58. 58. Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />“Try harder” is a sure-fire way to get nowhere when people are doing their best under a prevailing paradigm. <br />Instead of asking your people to try harder, how about asking them to think differently? <br />
  59. 59. Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />Allow people to think in different ways to improve performance, and then unleash them and see what happens. <br />
  60. 60. Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />Look for areas that need improvement, tell people what you want done and why, and then guide them. <br />
  61. 61. Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow and improve<br />The trust and confidence given to others will be rewarded in their enthusiasm, ownership of standards, and excellence. <br />People will amaze you with their ingenuity, and when they succeed, even partially, praise them in public.<br />
  62. 62. Challenge the Process<br />Experiment and take risks by constantly generating small wins and learning from mistakes<br />A leader who promotes creativity and change must have the maturity to accept that not all will turn out well. <br />There is no better way to bring improvement to a halt than to punish someone when honest innovation goes awry. <br />Innovation rarely comes from a unit led by a screamer.<br />
  63. 63. Experiment and take risks by constantly generating small wins and learning from mistakes<br />Humility and courage are complementary qualities and admitting mistakes takes courage. <br />Few people have earned respect who have not admitted mistakes, accepted feedback, or listened to others. <br />
  64. 64. Experiment and take risks by constantly generating small wins and learning from mistakes<br />Leaders must allow mistakes to teach and learn.<br />They must never allow failure.<br />
  65. 65. Experiment and take risks by constantly generating small wins and learning from mistakes<br />Real leaders promote the idea that disagreement does not equal disrespect. <br />The best leaders revel in disagreement because they know that independent thinking is the only way to discover the best solutions to problems. <br />
  66. 66. Experiment and take risks by constantly generating small wins and learning from mistakes<br />Independent thinking cannot occur in an environment that demands blind obedience.<br />The magic of exchanging ideas is getting to know what and how other people think.<br />Having faith and confidence in each other’s performance in uncertain and ambiguous situations is the key to initiative.<br />
  67. 67. Enable Others to Act<br />Foster collaboration by promoting cooperative goals and building trust<br />“You can’t do it alone” is the mantra of exemplary leaders.<br />You simply can’t get extraordinary things done by yourself. <br />
  68. 68. Foster collaboration by promoting cooperative goals and building trust<br />Collaboration is the master skill that enables teams, partnerships, and other alliances to function effectively. <br />Leaders foster collaboration by promoting cooperative goals and building trust.<br />
  69. 69. Foster collaboration by promoting cooperative goals and building trust<br />At the very heart of cooperation is trust. Leaders help create a trusting climate by the example they set and through active listening. <br />
  70. 70. Foster collaboration by promoting cooperative goals and building trust<br />Collaboration can be sustained only when leaders promote a sense of mutual reliance – the feeling that we’re all in this together. <br />
  71. 71. Enable Others to Act<br />Strengthen others by sharing power and discretion<br />Creating a climate where people are involved and feel important is at the heart of strengthening others. <br />
  72. 72. Strengthen others by sharing power and discretion<br />It’s essentially the process of turning constituents into leaders themselves – making people capable of acting on their own initiative. <br />
  73. 73. Strengthen others by sharing power and discretion<br />People must have the latitude to make their own decisions. <br />They must work in an environment that both builds their ability to perform a task and promotes a sense of self-confidence. <br />They must experience a sense of personal accountability so that they can feel ownership for their achievements.<br />
  74. 74. Enable Others to Act<br />Define clear roles and responsibilities<br />Clear expectations produce good results. <br />People generally want to do well. <br />When leaders make expectations clear, people tend to rise to the occasion to meet them. <br />
  75. 75. Define clear roles and responsibilities<br />When you analyze why an individual or unit failed to accomplish what you wanted, the reason is often unclear expectations and poor guidance. <br />Few things are more demoralizing than to believe you have done a good job, only to be told that you have completely missed the mark. <br />
  76. 76. Define clear roles and responsibilities<br />Articulate expectations and have subordinates read back (the guidance) for possible correction. <br />If you work for someone who provides fuzzy expectations, read back for possible correction until you know what the person wants.<br />
  77. 77. Define clear roles and responsibilities<br />Clarifying expectations does not mean handholding or telling people how to do their jobs. <br />Simply express what you want done and why and then unleash your subordinates’ creativity to accomplish the mission.<br />
  78. 78. Define clear roles and responsibilities<br />How much guidance you give depends on the amount of trust and confidence you have in one another. <br />
  79. 79. Define clear roles and responsibilities<br />Knowing what to do is knowing the letter of the law; knowing why you do it is knowing its spirit.<br /> Making the “what and why” clear enables subordinates to take meaningful initiative, and they might even succeed beyond expectations.<br />
  80. 80. Define clear roles and responsibilities<br />Enforcing standards and accountabilities demonstrates that what we say is important and what we do is consistent.<br />Making policies that we do not enforce sends the message that standards are not important.<br />
  81. 81. Define clear roles and responsibilities<br />If discipline means doing what is right, then education is the critical component of discipline.<br />Education helps promote ownership of standards. <br />People will be far more willing to meet standards when they understand their importance and do not regard them as mere harassment.<br />
  82. 82. Enable Others to Act<br />Leave a Legacy<br />Great leaders leave a legacy of excellence for their unit by creating compellingly effective systems and leaving the systems in place when they, themselves, leave. <br />
  83. 83. Leave a Legacy<br />The test of the systems’ excellence comes when a leader’s successor arrives. <br />If the successor understands the logic and the effectiveness of the systems the previous leader has put in place and keeps those systems in place, the previous leader will have succeeded.<br />
  84. 84. Leave a Legacy<br />Viable systems sustain predictability and balance, and because the best systems do not depend on a leader’s personality, units do not need to reinvent the wheel after every transition. <br />A unit with sound systems in place can sustain excellence over a long period.<br />
  85. 85. Encourage the Heart<br />Recognize contributions by showing appreciation for individual excellence<br />Accomplishing extraordinary things in organizations is hard work. <br />To keep hope and determination alive, leaders recognize contributions by showing appreciation for individual excellence. <br />
  86. 86. Recognize contributions by showing appreciation for individual excellence<br />Use thank you notes, smiles, awards, and public praise to demonstrate your appreciation. <br />Leaders love to boast about the achievements of others. <br />They make others feel like winners.<br />
  87. 87. Recognize contributions by showing appreciation for individual excellence<br />Leaders expect the best of people.<br />Recognition is done in a context of high expectations and clear standards. <br />
  88. 88. Recognize contributions by showing appreciation for individual excellence<br />By paying attention, offering encouragement, personalizing appreciation, and maintaining a positive outlook, leaders stimulate, rekindle and focus people’s energies.<br />
  89. 89. Recognize contributions by showing appreciation for individual excellence<br />Correct and train people in private, reward them in public.<br />
  90. 90. Encourage the Heart<br />Celebrate the values and victories by creating a spirit of community<br />Give awards for small group’s successes, and publicize both the groups and their leaders.<br />
  91. 91. Celebrate the values and victories by creating a spirit of community<br />Try something new and have the maturity to write off mistakes along the way.<br />The road to excellence is not smooth; it is bumpy and full of high adventure; it is fun, painful, daunting, exciting, and rewarding.<br />
  92. 92. Celebrate the values and victories by creating a spirit of community<br />When a project falters, praise the individual publicly for having the guts to try something new.<br />Look for the golden nuggets in the effort that the unit can use, and take the time to see if the effort can be directed onto another area. <br />Chances are you will see plenty of ways to use the innovations and ideas embedded in the project.<br />
  93. 93. Encourage the Heart<br />Show You Care<br />Caring comes in myriad forms, including providing high-quality training, good tools and equipment, and a good quality of life for subordinates and their families.<br />
  94. 94. Show You Care<br />Leaders demonstrate that they care about people as individuals rather than as personnel or “human resources”.<br />
  95. 95. Show You Care<br />Great leaders do not need to read from a three-by-five card to discuss subordinates’ accomplishments at a promotion, award, or farewell. <br />They visit family members in the hospital. <br />They write letters to spouses after subordinates get awards or promotions, explaining why the person is valuable to the unit and to the organization. <br />
  96. 96. Show You Care<br />When leaders demonstrate they truly care, bonds of trust and respect grow stronger. <br />Employees and their families will have confidence that the leader cares. <br />
  97. 97. Show You Care<br />Caring takes time and effort, but then, anything worthwhile takes time and effort. <br />Take the time and effort to show others they are valuable members of the team<br />
  98. 98. Encourage the Heart<br />Treat People With Respect<br />Respect begins with the conviction that all members of the human race are created equal despite differences in appearance, aptitudes, and talents. <br />
  99. 99. Treat People With Respect<br />Leaders must understand the distinction between personal respect and professional respect. <br />People who add more value to the organization deserve and earn more professional respect.<br />
  100. 100. Treat People With Respect<br />Professional respect requires that we recognize and value the unique contribution of every individual in the organization. <br />Certainly some people, given their talents and dedication, contribute more than others less able or less motivated. <br />
  101. 101. Treat People With Respect<br />Treating people with respect requires us to tell them when they fail to meet our standards. <br />Not correcting a mistake or deficiency sends a subtle message that the individual is not worth our time because s/he is either incapable of meeting standards or not important enough to be bothered with.<br />
  102. 102. Treat People With Respect<br />Respect goes hand-in-hand with caring. <br />When we show subordinates that we care about them, we demonstrate by our actions that we respect them, and we help them grow personally and professionally. <br />
  103. 103. Treat People With Respect<br />People want to be treated with respect as human beings and as contributors to the unit. <br />They want to know that their contributions are meaningful and important. <br />When they know they are contributing to the common good, they have a sense of fulfillment.<br />
  104. 104. Treat People With Respect<br />Morale is a function of knowing what you are doing is important, doing it well, and knowing it is appreciated.<br />- Unknown<br />

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