Group 2 Project Demonstration
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  • 1. Project Demonstration Learning & Teaching Effectively: From the classroom to the boardroom LAURA A. BLACK KATELYN NEARY
  • 2. Purpose of the Project  Create a program/syllabus that will assist adults in becoming more effective and efficient learners.  Use one of the five learning contexts and environments to create a syllabus Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 3. Introduction  In this project, 6 steps were conducted to design a syllabus for adult learners  Five dimensions of environment & context in learning       Physical Cultural Knowledge Power „Real life‟ environment SOURCE  Identified „real life‟ environment as meeting objectives of project best Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 4. Steps to Complete Project Syllabus Design Program Investigation Literature Review Topic Selection Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 Syllabus Evaluations
  • 5. Literature Review Findings Caffarella and Merriam (1999) believe that the environment and context in learning can create a set of learning and facilitating principles to help all adults become more effective learners regardless of their background and circumstances. This principle was the guiding factor for our literature review as we developed a deeper understanding of how the physical, cultural, power, knowledge, and „real-life‟ environments can help nurture adult learning. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 6. Physical Environment Literature Review Main Idea #1 Implications  Classroom should encourage Physical Environment includes all environments‟ affected by ergonomics Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 learning not discourage.  Preparation and back-up plans are essential. Try to minimize affect ergonomics(understand you can‟t completely eliminate all).  Prepare to reorganize the room and ensure quality physical resources are available (temperature systems, sounds, visuals, furniture)
  • 7. Cultural Environment Literature Review Main Idea #2 -Make best effort to create open and comfortable environment for all (students & facilitator). - Cultural environments are major factor of creating positive/negative learning environments Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 Implications -Awareness and acceptable that all individuals are different. Providing a comfortable environment for all to use their „voice‟ as open and freely without judgment. use effective communication skills (listening activity, letting others by different). - Adult educators can start to become more sensitive to cultural difference in the classroom by first examining the cultural values that underlie their preferred methods of teaching. Diversifying teaching methods should be an interactive process with learners that enrich all of adult learning.
  • 8. Power Environment Literature Review Main idea #3  Power environments can be controlled by facilitator  All individuals have powerincluding both the facilitator and participantsThe impact of power within the environment can be distinguished by various elements- mainly facilitator. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 Implications  Facilitators should encourage individuals to express themselves and their knowledge, and experiences among others.  Balance is needed to ensure all students feel sense of power as well as the facilitator.  facilitator should analyze and confront power-related incidents by calling attention to power dynamics when they arise
  • 9. Knowledge Environment Literature Review Main idea # 4  Each student is their own resource of knowledge. Therefore each has particular knowledge based on experience, age, gender, race, upbringing, career, etc. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 Implications  Try to get information on students prior to course beginning- using questionnaire- about background, education, etc. To be more aware and prepare in advance if needed.  Facilitator must maintain a positive and safe environment.
  • 10. Real-life Environment Literature Review Main idea # 5  Provides students with the ability to apply instruction outside of classroom and to reallife problem solving. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 Implications  Preparing students with actual relevant assignments that could be applicable in a workplace setting.  Gives students confidence for future in workplace setting that cannot be achieved using a traditional classroom approach  Make connections with learners to create real-life applications
  • 11. Main Ideas from Literature Review  Support for adult learners is provided through a learning environment that meets both physical and psychological needs. Such a learning environment is also essential in successful partnerships between learners and instructors (Imel, 1998).  The goal should be to develop an atmosphere in which adult learners feel both safe and challenged, with learners encouraged to become active participants in the teaching/learning process, with some degree of mutual involvement in the determination of instructional objectives (Biswalo, 2001). Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 12. Main Ideas from Program Investigation Environment and Context: Real-life Environment After researching for our literature review, we investigated several programs that focused on “reallife” situations and how they improve . The environment and context have a profound impact on learners and five aspects have been identified from an analysis of the literature as the main contributors to environment including: the physical, the cultural, the power, the knowledge, and the „real life‟ environment (MacKeracher, 2004). Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 13. Program Investigation Rationale  Using „real cases‟ for workplace problem solving in the classroom can provide many benefits to both the instructor and participant; furthermore, by filling the student „learning gap‟ between the abstract conceptualization and reflection of the university and the practical experience and experiment evident in industry (Hodge, Wright, Barraket, Scott, Melville, & Richardson, 2011). Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 14. Program 1: PricewaterhouseCoopers Experiential Case Study  Develop an understanding of the impact of information systems on organizations and how those information systems are developed.  Acquire the ability to identify business problems, make decisions regarding the problem and document how those problems can be addressed with an information system.  Encouraging students to treat the case as „real work‟ rather than a class assignment is another main feature of this program Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 15. Program 2: Simulation-based learning: Just like the real thing  focuses on using “real life” environments and scenarios to help learners in the medical field but can be applied to any discipline  Helps to resolve practical dilemmas (critical thinking needed to narrow options, assess situations to gain results)  Helps build communication skills(building trust and rapport, active listening to know when “not to step on each other‟s toes”, define roles and responsibilities, communicate awareness of common goals) Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 16. Program 3 Learning from Others: Learning in a Social Context  Assist performance and the “zone of proximal development”(identify students‟ level of proficiency )  Develop strategies for fostering communication  recognize when students should work collaboratively to assist one another and take on expert roles which strengthens, reinforces, and refines learning Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 17. Rationale of Syllabus  Exclusively based on literature reviewed and programs investigated  Syllabus incorporated ideas and concepts from all research  Using these concepts facilitators will provide a more effective and efficient „real life‟ learning environment  Syllabus tried to create learning environment conducive to maximum amount of individuals and learning styles Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 18. Seminar Syllabus Page 1 Page 2 Syllabus Design- Learning & Teaching Effectively: From the classroom to the boardroom Laura A. Black McCall Aldrich Katelyn Neary Ball State University Syllabus Design- Learning & Teaching Effectively: From the classroom to the boardroom Interpretation of Rationale This syllabus design is for a business training program for a group of facilitators (instructors, professors, teachers) working at different universities across the state of Indiana. The contents of the course and the syllabus will focus on how facilitators can create a pleasant learning environment for students so they will learn business more efficiently. There are five dimensions of environment and context including the physical, cultural, knowledge, power and real-life environments; furthermore, for this syllabus design focus is on the „real life‟ environment. Based on programs that were researched, this syllabus will incorporate ideas and concepts for each program. The concepts will assist the facilitators in providing a „real-life‟ learning experience for each student to assist in a powerful learning experience. Each seminar attendee will gain personal experience from the learning process and knowledge in how to guide and better prepare students for this „real-life‟ context incorporation. A syllabus has been designed to capture all of the extraordinary features identified by programs previously investigated and the literature that has been reviewed. The seminar, Learning & Teaching Effectively: From the Classroom to the Boardroom, has been designed to recognize the importance that environment and context can have on adult learning. This seminar is a training program that highlights these external factors. Programs Three programs were investigated to overcome the limitations identified by the literature review. The first program, “PricewaterhouseCoopers Experimental Case Study” used an undergraduate course to complete a systems analysis project replicable to one industry professional‟s use. The second program, “Simulation-based Learning” Just like the Real Thing” helped medical students and other health professionals‟ develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and teamwork to enhance performance on the job. The third program, “Learning from Others: Learning in a Social Context” takes examples of different facilitators in how their teaching was affected by social interactions in different settings; furthermore, this program provides facts on how these social interactions among students can enhance the learning environment in a „real-life‟ setting. The seminar held will use realistic scenarios incorporating the previous mentioned programs to allow for those attending to get „real-life‟ experience that will enhance business skills. Retraining and practicing sessions will take place till one can master the procedure or skill being taught. Teamwork training conducted in the simulated environment may offer an additive benefit to the traditional didactic instruction, enhance performance, and possibly also help increase learning effectiveness. Features integrated into syllabus & seminar design Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 19. Seminar Syllabus Page 3 Page 4 Many great features were identified by the programs investigated that were considered in the creation of the course syllabus as well as use of „real life‟ environment. Features from “PricewaterhouseCoopers Experimental Case Study” provide great ideas that should be implemented into a syllabus. The first feature of this program that will be intergraded is the facilitator‟s encouragement for students to treat the case as „real work‟ rather than a class assignment; furthermore, students were told to act as PwC system and process assurance consultants. The second feature that will be integrated into the syllabus design involves the emphasis on skills developed from the case and how applicable they are to a variety of contexts and firms. Stressing the importance of the skills acquired from the „real life‟ case study approach and how beneficial it is for an person in a working environment, not just as an employee of whatever industry topic is being used for the case. The third feature applicable to our syllabus design is the discussion of nuances not portrayed in the classroom, but may arise in the „real world‟. Features from “Simulation-based learning: Just like the Real Thing” provides simulation-based training techniques, tools, and strategies that can be applied in designing structured learning experiences, as well as be used as a measurement tool linked to targeted teamwork competencies and learning objectives. The first feature of this program that will be integrated is to encourage critical thinking to resolve dilemmas. This will allow participants of this seminar to use critical thinking to narrow options and assess situations to gain results. The second feature of this program that will be integrated into the syllabus design will allow time and tools for retraining and practice until a skill or procedure is mastered. This will give participants the tools needed to successfully complete a task once they return to their place of work. The third feature applied will be building communication skills through collaborative group work. This will give participants the opportunity to build trust and rapport with co-workers, use active listening to know when “not to step on each other‟s toes,” to clearly define roles and responsibilities, as well as communicate awareness of common goals. Features from “Learning From Others: Learning in a Social Context” provide guided social interactions to increase the learning sophistication in each student‟s situation. The first feature that will be incorporated in this syllabus design for training program will be; guided discussions in the classroom. Students will have opportunities to voice their knowledge of business and their personal experiences with the assistance of the Facilitator. The Facilitator will lead discussions in in a professional setting, guiding meaning discussions on business topics and incorporating „reallife‟ scenarios to get each student thinking and learning from one another as-well-as learning from the educated instructor. The second feature that will be incorporated from this program in the training is small group work. There will be opportunity for each person attending this training to be assigned in a small group and learn to work through a business problem or situation with this group. The social interactions in this group will facilitate a meaning learning experience. The third feature to be incorporated in the syllabus design for this learning program is the „reciprocal teaching‟ that is taught in the „Learning in a Social Context.‟ Each group will be assigned to work through a business situation together, then groups will present their material teaching the others in this training the information they came up with. This experience will provide each person with greater understanding of the material and gain experience in different social settings. The programs investigated provide excellent features from which our group can build an effective program. Attention of the physical, cultural, knowledge, power, and real-life environment will be given while constructing our program. The program will try to create a learning environment conducive to as many individuals and learning styles as possible while using a „real life‟ environment approach. There are also ideas from the reviewed literature that will be implemented in the syllabus design in relation to learning and facilitating principles. According to Mackeracher (2004), “the brain requires that learning activities be carried out in a physically supportive environment in which the learner is reasonably comfortable, the temperature and lighting are suitable, and the air quality is good. (p. 102) For the seminar, creating a physically supportive environment is a main focus as it should be for any facilitator. Providing a good example for the seminar attendees will allow facilitators to see experience the difference and hopefully try to recreate it when they are back in the classroom for their students. The seminar will be held in a large conference room with the tables initially set up in a term known as a „Cluster‟ (Lawson, 2009, p.157). This allows for the trainer to allow for moderate group involvement during the presentations and discussions of the case studies. The „cluster‟ table set up also allows for two-way communication compared to most conference table settings. These features previously mentioned from the investigations‟ and literature will serve as a basis for the design of the proposed syllabus. There are five main features that will be implemented: 1. Instructors highlight benefits and possible barriers of using case study in class room setting. 2. Strategies learned can be applied to design additional learning experiences. 3. Students should act more as researchers compared to traditional students. Implementation To implement these features into the design of a syllabus, modifications are needed to maximize the effectiveness of the features within the syllabus. The first feature will be advocated in the syllabus by the reading material and learning tools, which emphasize encouragement from facilitators to treat the case as „real work‟ rather than another assignment and putting an emphasis on the numerous industries that are applicable to the case; therefore, while also discussing the differences between „real world‟ and classroom problems. The syllabus will include activities to reiterate the second feature by highlighting the professional skills acquired from the use of a „reallife‟ or case study. The third feature will be reinstated in the syllabus by encouraging social interactions in several different settings such as giving students more responsibility in the classroom; Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 20. Seminar Syllabus Page 5 furthermore, for example allowing them to check email in class and encourage communication to be that of a business professional. Conclusions In the creation of Learning & Teaching Effectively, the physical, cultural, power, knowledge, and „real life‟ environments were all considered and addressed in the integration and application of the seminar. By designing a seminar and syllabus that is based on using real life environments it will hopefully create more effective learning and teaching practices. Seminar Outline Learning & Teaching Effectively: From the Classroom to the Boardroom Seminar Outline Seminar Website: www.classroom2boardroom.com Session Meetings: Saturday, January 25th, 2014 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM Sunday, January 26th, 2014, 8 AM to 4 PM Saturday, February 1st, 2014, 8 AM to 4 PM Sunday, February 2nd, 2014, 8 AM to 4 PM Location: Indiana Convention Center, Room 101 100 S. Capitol Indianapolis, IN Instructor: Dr. Ball State Instructor Contact Information: bstate@bsu.edu Cell phone: 317-333-3333 Office phone: 317-555-5555 Seminar Objectives Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 Page 6 1. To learn the benefits and possible barriers of using a case study in a classroom setting. 2. To learn strategies that can be applied to design additional learning experiences. 3. To acknowledge the importance of treating students as a professional and not as a traditional student. 4. To identify and apply social interactions as support for future learning and teaching experiences. 5. To become familiar with teaching in groups and the benefits of learning role contexts. Skill level requirements for seminar attendees: Professor or instructor at a university headquartered and located in Indiana; Interest and/or experience in using „real life‟ case study; At least 5 years‟ experience as an instructor or facilitator at particular university. **Note the special requirements for attendance. Contact bstate@bsu.edu for further questions in relation to the skill level requirements. Seminar Format The seminar will include multiple forms of instruction and evaluation including individual, small, and large group work. Instructional methods will include lecture presentations, pre-session questionnaires, assigned reading materials, discussion, case study evaluations, videos, expert speaker presentations, testimonials, and question and answer sessions. For convenience and understanding handouts, worksheets, and notes will be available online and at each seminar meeting. Nametags will be provided at each seminar meeting check-in to try to help familiarize the attendees with one another. Nametags will include: First and Last name, University, Area of study, years in the position. It is expected that attendees arrive with time to check-in, collect name tags and any session documents, and are ready for participation. Attendance: Attendees are allowed up to a quarter day of absence from the seminar or 2.25 hours over the course of the four seminar meetings. There will be no make-up opportunities available. If attendance cannot be achieved due to any circumstance including emergency- withdrawal from the conference should be considered. The stringent attendance policies required of the seminar is based on the certification that is awarded after completion of the 4 seminar meetings. Successful completion will be judged based on attendance, completion of pre-questionnaire, reading material with assignments, and participation. We ask all participants to clear their schedules in advance, so limited interruptions and complete participation is achieved. Any questions or concerns in relation to the attendance policy and withdrawal procedure, contact Dr. Ball State, bstate@bsu.edu.
  • 21. Seminar Syllabus Page 7 Page 8 Certification: Upon successful completion of the seminar and assigned materials a conference certification will be issued to each successful attendee. The certificate will instate the successful completion of the “Learning & Teaching Effectively: From the Classroom to the Boardroom” seminar and the skills acquired and topics discussed. See Exhibit #4 for the Learning & teaching effectively: From the classroom to the boardroom certificate. Accommodations: If any attendee needs any adaptations or accommodations because of a disability or any other reason, please contact bstate@bsu.edu in advance to allow for appropriate procedures as well as notification of the Indiana Convention Center personnel. The Indiana Convention Center allows guests to walk from Lucas Oil Stadium to twelve premium hotels including the Westin, Hyatt, Marriott, Conrad, Omni, Crowne Plaza at Union Station, Embassy Suites, and JW Marriott. There are over 7,100 + hotel rooms within blocks of the Indiana Convention Center. The seminar has a special premium package deal with The Westin Indianapolis Hotel. The address of The Westin is 50. S Capitol Ave Indianapolis, IN 46204, phone contact: (317) 262-8100. The Indiana Convention Center is connected via an enclosed walkway to The Westin Indianapolis Hotel. For a special seminar package pricing use the promotion code: Classroom to boardroom. There is no obligation for seminar attendees to stay at The Westin Indianapolis Hotel; furthermore, there are an abundant number of hotels located closely to the Indiana Convention Center, if The Westin is not of preference. There are 108 rooms within 1 block of the Convention Center and the skywalk connects to 4,715 hotel rooms. 1-1.5 miles from Convention Center there are 379 rooms available, with so many different rooms available in a close proximity to the seminar the decision to hold the conference at the convention center was made (Indiana Convention Center, n.d.). Parking Downtown Indianapolis hosts more than 70,000 parking spaces. An interactive map is available with pricing, hours, and more at Indianapolis Downtown Inc. and parking reservations can be made at Parking Whiz. Go to http://www.indydt.com/interactivemap.cfm?&lm=vd for more information about parking and reservations. Internet Accessibility Free Wi-Fi is available in the Convention Center for tasks that are not bandwidth intensive such as reading email and light internet browsing. Clients that require higher needs can contact Smart City Networks. The seminar committee has taken care of this and seminar attendees are encouraged to bring personal lap tops or operating systems. Assignments A pre-assessment questionnaire (Exhibit #2) will be distributed to each seminar attendee via email and United States postal mail service approximately 3-4 weeks prior to the first seminar meeting. If it is past December 16th, and no email or hard copy has been distributed to the attendee, please contact bstate@bsu.edu immediately. The purpose of the questionnaire is to provide the facilitator of this program with insights into your current skills or knowledge about the subject of using „real life‟ environment in the classroom. By knowing what new skills and knowledge you would like from the program, the facilitator will be better able to meet your needs. Specific reading material is assigned and is available on the seminar webpage (www.classroom2boardroom.com). Requests for additional hard copies should be made to bstate@bsu.edu in advance with understanding of U.S. postal mailing delivery methods. Each reading material requires the completion of an assignment, the document is standard for all three reading assignments and can be found on the webpage and under Exhibit #3 Not only are the assignments due at the start of the conference, but each attendee should be prepared for a discussion and evaluation over reading material. Reading & Assignment # 1: From the Journal of Innovative Education, “A systems analysis experiential case study: Repeatable real-world problem solving.” Reading and assignment #1 due: Saturday, January 25th, 8 AM Reading & Assignment #2: From the Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock: the article titled, “Simulation-based learning: Just like the real thing.” Reading and assignment #2 due: Sunday, January 26th, 8 AM Reading & Assignment #3: From the research article titled, “Learning from others: Learning in a social context.” Reading and assignment #3 due: Saturday, February 1st, 8 AM. The morning each reading and assignment is due, dedication will be given at the seminar for each assignment, starting with a small group discussion (at each individual table), followed by a total group discussion- moderated by Dr. Ball State. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 Seminar Meetings and Schedule of events Learning & Teaching Effectively: From the Classroom to the Boardroom Saturday, January 25th, 2014 8:00- 8:30 AM Registration/Check in 8:30-9:00 AM Welcome/Opening Comments/Ice Breaker 9:00-9:30 AM Evaluate pre-session questionnaires responses, discussion
  • 22. Seminar Syllabus Page 9 Page 10 9:30-9:45 AM Break/Snacks Provided 9:45-10:30 AM Discussion on case study (reading assignment #1) A Systems Analysis Experiential Case Study: Repeatable real-world problem solving 10:30-11:00 AM Break into groups – evaluate case 11:00-11:15 AM Total group discussion 11:15-11:45 AM Video on real-life experience case study 11:45 AM-12:00 PM Questions/comments on seminar so far 12:00-1:15 PM Break for lunch, lunch tickets provided in welcome packet 1:15-1:30 PM- Return from lunch 1:30-2:30 PM- Presentation/ Q&A: Dr. Priscilla Arling, Professor at Butler University, author of Case Study: A Systems Analysis Experiential Case Study: Repeatable real-world problem solving 2:30-3:00 PM Meet and Greet with Dr. Arling 3:30 PM Explanation of future readings & meetings, Questions 4:00 PM Dismissal Sunday, January 26th, 2014 8:00- 8:30 AM Registration/Check in 8:30-9:00 AM Welcome/Opening Comments/Ice Breaker 9:00-9:30 AM Introduction & Discussion about yesterday‟s meeting 9:30-9:45 AM Break/Snacks Provided 9:45-10:30 AM Discussion on case study (reading assignment #2) From the Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock; “Simulation-based learning: Just like the real thing.” 10:30-11:00 AM Break into groups – evaluate case 11:00-11:15 AM Total group discussion 11:15-11:45 AM Video on real-life experience case study 11:45 AM-12:00 PM Questions/comments on seminar so far 12:00-1:15 PM Break for lunch, lunch tickets provided in welcome packet 1:15-1:30 PM- Return from lunch 1:30-2:30 PM- Presentation/ Q&A: Dr. Ball State, Experience and work with „real life‟ case studies 2:30 PM Explanation of future readings & meetings, Questions 3:00 PM Dismissal Saturday, February 1st, 20148:00- 8:30 AM Registration/Check in 8:30-9:00 AM Welcome/Opening Comments/Ice Breaker 9:00-9:30 AM Evaluate previous seminar meetings 9:30-9:45 AM Break/Snacks Provided 9:45-10:30 AM Discussion on case study (reading assignment #3) “Learning from others: Learning in a social context.” 10:30-11:00 AM Break into groups – evaluate case 11:00-11:15 AM Total group discussion 11:15-11:45 AM Video on real-life experience case study 11:45 AM-12:00 PM Questions/comments on seminar so far 12:00-1:15 PM Break for lunch, lunch tickets provided in welcome packet 1:15-1:30 PM- Return from lunch 1:30-2:30 PM- Presentation/ Q&A: Dr. May, Professor with over 20 years of case study experience 2:30-3:00 PM Meet and Greet with Dr. May 3:30 PM Explanation of future readings & meetings, Questions 4:00 PM Dismissal Sunday, February 2nd, 2014 8:00- 8:30 AM Registration/Check in 8:30-9:00 AM Welcome/Opening Comments/Ice Breaker 9:00-9:30 AM Evaluation of previous seminar meetings Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 23. Seminar Syllabus Page 12 Page 11 9:30-9:45 AM Break/Snacks Provided 9:45-10:30 AM Discussion on seminar and objectives achieved 10:30-11:00 AM Break into groups – evaluate seminar 11:00-11:15 AM Total group discussion 11:15-12:00 PM Questions/comments on seminar so far 12:00-1:15 PM Break for lunch, lunch tickets provided in welcome packet 1:15-1:30 PM- Return from lunch 1:30-3:00PM- Presentation of Certificate of Completion 3:30 PM- Farwell & Dismissal REFERENCES Arling, P.A., Deeter. C., & Eggers, H. (2010). A system analysis experiential case study: Repeatable real-world problem solving. Journal of Innovative Education, 8 (2), 417-422. Hammond, D., Austin K., Orcutt S., Martin, D.(nd). Session 7 Learning from others: Learning in a Social Context, 125-142. Indiana Convention Center (ICC). (n.d.). In Indiana Convention Center and Lucas Oil Stadium online. Retrieved from http://www.icclos.com/about.aspx. Lateef, F. (2009). Simulation-based learning: Just like the real thing. Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock, 3(4), 348-352. Lawson, K. (2009). The Trainer‟s handbook (3rd Updated ed.). San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer Wiley Press. MacKeracher, D. M. (2004). Making sense of adult learning (2nd ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635 EXHIBITS EXHIBIT 1 Participant Cover Letter Dear Program Participant: Welcome to the Learning & teaching effectively: From the classroom to the boardroom workshop! I am looking forward to meeting and working with you as we explore ways to enhance and create pleasant learning and „real life‟ environments to improve teaching and learning. In preparation for this session, I am asking you to complete the following pre-session assignments: 1) Confidential Pre-session Questionnaire. Please fax your completed questionnaire to me by January 17th. My fax number is 317-666-6666. 2) Assignment & Reading Material #1: Please bring your completed assignment with any questions or comments to the session on January 25th. It is imperative that you complete these pre-session assignments. We do not want to take valuable seminar time to complete this work. It should take you about one hour to complete both assignments. This seminar will be highly interactive, and you will have several opportunities to apply concepts and skills to „real life‟ scenarios. See you on Saturday, January 25th, 2014! Sincerely, Dr. Ball State, Ph.D. Program Facilitator
  • 24. Seminar Syllabus Page 13 Page 14 EXHIBIT 2 Confidential Pre-Session Questionnaire The purpose of this questionnaire is to provide the facilitator of this program with insights into your current skills in or knowledge about the subject of using „real life‟ environment in the classroom. By knowing what skills and knowledge you would like from the program the facilitator will be better able to meet your needs. Name:_____________________ Current Position:________________________ University:_________________ City, State:_____________________________ Previous experience with real life environment: Previous positions held: Formal education beyond high school: What course, workshops, or seminars have you attended related to the topic? Briefly describe the responsibilities of your current position: How long have you facilitated others? How many students are in your program? What do you believe is the most difficult problem or challenge you face when trying to translate „real life‟ to students? What one specific thing do you want to get out of this program? What concerns do you have about participating in this learning experience? Additional comments: EXHIBIT 3 Seminar Assignments Instructions: Read the following articles, which can be found at www.classroom2boardroom.com, and answer the following questions for each reading assignment (numbers one through three). These questions will guide your small group discussions at the start of each seminar. Reading & Assignment # 1: From the Journal of Innovative Education, “A systems analysis experiential case study: Repeatable real-world problem solving.” Reading and assignment #1 due: Saturday, January 25th, 8 AM Reading & Assignment #2: From the Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock: the article titled, “Simulation-based learning: Just like the real thing.” Reading and assignment #2 due: Sunday, January 26th, 8 AM Reading & Assignment #3: From the research article titled, “Learning from others: Learning in a social context.” Reading and assignment #3 due: Saturday, February 1st, 8 AM. Text Box: Assignment Questions 1. How do the ideas in the text relate to your life (personal and professional)? 2. How will you implement these ideas into your classroom? 3. What conclusion can you draw about the importance of using real-life situations in the classroom? Please Fax this to Dr. Ball State at (317) 666-6666 no later than January 17th, 2014. Any questions please email bstate@bsu.edu. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 25. Page 15 EXHIBIT 4 Certificate of Completion Page 16 Syllabus Design Team Contributions: McCall Aldrich: Program description, description & features of program Laura Black: Program description, description & features of program, Exhibit 3- Seminar assignments and questions, Exhibit 4- Certificate of Completion Katelyn Neary: Program description, description & features of program, Seminar Outline, Exhibit 1- Participant Cover Letter, Exhibit 2- Pre-session Questionnaire. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 26. Syllabus Evaluation 1 Comments and Improvements   Evaluator One: Sarah Hill Occupation: Director of Employment Services at Cummins Behavior Health Systems in Indianapolis. We will make it clear that course credits will not be offered so that there will be no confusion for participants seeking credit. 1) What do you like about the syllabus design? Overall, I was very impressed with the syllabus design of Learning & Teaching Effectively: From the classroom to the boardroom. I found the design to be well thought out, clearly defined, and very structured. As a director of employment and facilitator of vocational workshops, I really enjoyed how the skill level requirements of the participants were clearly noted. This would help me determine if the seminar is more beneficial to my clients or my staff members. I can‟t speak enough about the accommodations section! I especially appreciated the information on parking because parking in Indianapolis can be exasperating and expensive. In fact, this is sometimes a deterrent for participants. The website your group provided seminar participants gives clear directions for parking availability and location. From experience, I‟ve been to many cities and spent over an hour trying to find parking and that gives participants a negative impression before the seminar ever begins! The Pre-session questionnaire empowers participants to be successful because there We will create a is no guess work on the material that will be covered. Giving participants a sense of purpose post-seminar and preparedness is a great start to any learning experience. Additionally, reading survey so we will have the assignments are very clear and gives participants a timeline that is conducive with busy information adult schedules. Lastly, the accommodations section for people with handicaps was a great necessary to idea. I‟ve been to several seminars where people with disabilities have needs that were improve on overlooked because there was no way to communicate with facilitators to set-up future seminars. alternatives. 2) What do you think should be improved? Why? How? It was unclear to me if the seminar would allow for course credits or not. I know there was a certificate of completion/attendance, but if someone wanted to earn credits could it be an option? Also, I did not see a post-seminar survey/evaluation. This is important because it allows facilitators to know if the participants grasped the concepts being taught and give facilitators feedback on what needs to be improved and what was executed well. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 27. Syllabus Evaluation 2 Comments and Improvements   Evaluator Two: Lucas Gobel Occupation: 7th Grade Science Teacher, Science Olympiad Coach, Camp Kikthawenund Program Director We will continue to provide a variety of activities to reach all learners. We agree that there is a risk when using participant-led activities, but believe the required skill level and experience necessary to attend will led to active participation by all. 1.) What do you like about the syllabus design? I really like how the expectations are laid out in the participants‟ handouts. It had every answer to every question I would have. I also liked the thought that was put into the set-up with a combination of instructor directed, group directed, and then participant directed activities. I found the syllabus wellresearched in teaching philosophy. The variety of activities would make a more valuable learning experience to anyone that participated. All research points to small group activities being effective. 2.) What do you think should be improved? Why? How? While the syllabus does a great job of setting up expectations, I could not find the value of taking said seminar in any of the participant materials. Why should I take this? What value will this serve me in my company or classroom? Why should I attend this seminar? These questions could be answered up front with the description and objectives. I am always cautious of participant lead assignments. Even though they are valuable, if the effort isn't put forth by the participants of the whole group then everyone suffers (including the instructor). Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 28. Syllabus Evaluation 3 Comments and Improvements   Evaluator Three: Suzan Davis Occupation: Technical and grammatical recommendations by Suzan Davis, Adjunct English and Communication facility and Professional Development Coordinator at Ivy Tech Community College. We appreciated the semantic and grammatical suggestions to make the syllabus even better and will make the necessary changes. We agree that common sense cannot be expected when giving directions and will continue using specific word choice to meet the needs of all participants. Evaluator Three Suggestions: Throughout the syllabus: Observe ten and under rule, except for times or measurements, write out numbers under ten, as this is an academic setting Make times consistent: You have 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM on one line and 8am to 4 pm on three. Make it all the same. It is very good you put not only the day of the week, but also AM and PM because one can never assume, even when it seems obvious. Under Skill Level for attendees: Second line: Interest and/or experience in using “real life case study. Make it a real life case study. OR write case studies. Third line: At least 5 years‟ experience as an instructor or fascinator at particular university. What do you mean by particular? Does this mean any university? The first line already mentions Indiana professors or instructors so I am confused by this. The Seminar Format section clearly not only shows the participants what to expect, but the range of activities makes the seminar attract to numerous learning styles. Recommendation: last sentence: “arrive with time to check in, collect name tags, etc….this can be interpreted many ways. Instead: Check in 15 to 30 minutes before the first seminar at 8 AM. Attendance: Third sentence needs a complete rewrite. It is a fragment and does not express a complete thought. It is very nice that guests can walk via enclosed walkways from the convention center to their hotels. This is important information, often overlooked. Parking The interactive map is a fantastic addition. The last time I was in downtown Indy, I was asked where hotels were located compared to meeting places three times in three minutes. This will help guests envision where they are going. The early assignments and time lines help prepare participants to maximize the experience, and for their fascinators to do a better job. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 29. References      Biswalo, P. (2001). The systems approach as a catalyst for creating an effective learning environment. International Council for Adult Education, 34 (1). Hodge, P., Wright, S., Barraket, J., Scott, M., Melville, R., & Richardson, S. (2011). Revisiting „how we learn‟ in academia: practice-based learning exchanges in three Australian universities. Studies of Higher Education, 36 (2), 167-183. Imel, S. (1998). Trends and issues alert: Promoting intercultural understanding. Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education. (accessed 5 September 2013 from http://www.calpro-online.org/eric/docs/tia00066.pdf). MacKeracher, D. M. (2004). Making sense of adult learning (2nd ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Caffarella, R., & Merriam, S. (1999). Learning in adulthood: A comprehensive guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 30. Additional Information  For more information visit the blog link below:  http://edacenviornmentandcontext.blogspot.com/  Contact information of syllabus authors:  Katelyn Neary email: krneary@bsu.edu  Laura Black email:lablack2@bsu.edu Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635
  • 31. Thank You Project Demonstration- Black & Neary EDAC 635