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JustGiving research @ IoF Insights Annual Conference 2009
 

JustGiving research @ IoF Insights Annual Conference 2009

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This presentation was given at the Institute of Fundraising's Insight in Fundraising Annual Conference, on Thursday 5th November 2009.

This presentation was given at the Institute of Fundraising's Insight in Fundraising Annual Conference, on Thursday 5th November 2009.

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  • We’re fascinated about data, and the small things that make a big difference. Be that user experience to research. Are there certain profiles who respond better and more positively who respond to different methods? We wanted to find that out. We surveyed a sample of 2,820 of people who gave online, across all different types of charities It’s the biggest online collection of people and causes in the world, we have 10 million users, 1 in 5 of UK internet users, so it’s a unique snapshot of online giving habits. Bryan and I thought – great opportunity to generate some insight into the state of online giving, and who the people are who give This is the start – online donors, and we want to find out more about online fundraisers
  • We asked donors – is this your first online donation? Like the CR-UK data, the middle age ranges are comfortable and have done this before. BUT – 55-64 range is the second most comfortable There are a lot of people comfortable in giving and transacting online – are you meeting their needs? If you don’t ask them to give online – I’m sure you’ve read about *silver surfers* but are you doing anything about it? Benchmark your own online donors against this. Why are your own groups not as well represented? Would’ve said 25-34 was the biggest repeat donors – but it’s not – by a long way. Hide graph, then show.
  • What do people in the room think? What’s the traditional model...? Add in blank slide! Not getting into a debate over the battle of the sexes (who earns more), but in terms of profiling and segmentation, have you considered segmenting your ask by gender online?
  • Basic demographic data for the survey. >64 is the only range with more males – why do you think?
  • Just say this – key donation stat – avg is £30
  • What is your donor care strategy – do you differentiate based on age? As people get older, they give more What is the language you use and the channels – offline/online. I don’t think we have the same donor care for online donors as we do for offline – yet Will a clever charity segment a donor care strategy by age. Don’t they have different needs to the younger people? Has anyone done it?
  • While donors over 45 are under-represented in terms of numbers, they are over-represented in terms of value of donation. Put that another way, there are less of them, but each of them is giving more. 45-80 is a big span, tend to give more. But it’s the over 60s who are giving the highest??? 35-54 is worth 45% 25-54 = 62% revenue So what – how does your website work with older people? Are they targeted? Do you advertise on the sites they use? Is your own site older-people friendly. Is your marcomms strategy integrating online and offline.
  • Question – how to make this look ok!?! Older people are significantly more likely to donate more. Men have more of a peak in the >50.
  • Question – how to make this look ok!?! Older people are significantly more likely to donate more. Men have more of a peak in the >50.
  • So what – how does your website work with older people? Are they targeted? Do you advertise on the sites they use? Is your own site older-people friendly. Is your marcomms strategy integrating online and offline.
  • Overwhelming majority of people still respond to emails for online donations. To give you some context – here’s JG’s figures. Most comes from email – looking at the last four weeks, 16% comes from FB. 40% of referrals are direct – email. So you need to think of your audience and the tools they use. There’s been a shift from email to FB, but email still rules as a communication method. 2 years ago, FB was significantly less. Anyone replacing email with FB?
  • Get the most recent charts
  • Get the most recent charts
  • Last month suggests the opposite - symbiotic relationship between social media and email. September this year – less than one month ago. Think about it – how do you know you’ve got a FB message, or new comment – or a new follower on twitter – it’s by email!
  • When you drill into the ages, the clearer patterns emerge. None of them are that much of a surprise – but do you plan your comms or segment by this data. If you’re not using FB – are you missing out on a huge opportunity. We’re fascinated by FB, so I wanted to show you some facts that would be of interest. List the top sources to the JG site – Direct 40% (email), FB 16%, Google 15%
  • Sources from Facebook to JG. Percentage of referrals from FB home page – 60%. Not interrupting you – it’s in your news feed – what you are interested in Profile is 12% Group is 4% Search is 3% Inbox just 2% If you’re not set up for this, you need to be – it isn’t going away. If you want to engage people online, and you’re not on FB, you’re missing a trick. If you are, and you’re not sending messages, posting to your wall, then you may as well not be on there. 1. /home.php 303,103 59.88% 2. /profile.php 62,070 12.26% 3. /group.php 21,949 4.34% 4. /search/ 19,085 3.77% 5. /inbox/ 12,143 2.40% 6. /photo.php 9,080 1.79% 7. /posted.php 8,015 1.58% 8. /event.php 6,374 1.26% /album.php 5,191 1.03% /inbox/readmessage.php 4,852 0.96%
  • 3 rd largest country in world Time spent on Facebook by US consumers was up 700% year on year to April 2009* *Source Nielsen: http://bit.ly/1AJ7ni
  • Who’s using FB connect – who knows what it is?
  • Find a charity example too. Not just fundraising – campaigning, can be action, participation, engagement.
  • Who’s using FB connect – who knows what it is?
  • Up to the 13 th most popular site in the UK, just overtaken Flickr
  • Average time on page…
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/is-social-media-impacting-how-much-we-email John Smith aged 60 gets the same message, the same ask, the same channel as John Smith aged 30
  • Introduce the case study and how it links – Colin as an example of a new breed of fundraiser, using socmed tolls and networked fundraising/supporter recruitment theory in practice to reach new supporters. Imagine spending 365 days – a full year – undertaking as many challenges as you can to test yourself to the limit. Maybe not everyone's idea of fun ... but then imagine that across that year, you use those challenges to raise as much money as you can for a very, very good cause. Does that sound better? Add to the mix that you do it in memory of a loved family member, and there aren't many better reasons, are there?
  • When I launched the 365challenge in August 2008, while I was aware of Facebook, I had rarely used it, and I hadn’t really heard of Twitter. I wanted to use email and the internet as much as possible as I saw this as the way to spread my message. I think somewhere along the way I read, on either/both the CRUK and the JG sites, some tips on using Facebook, so I started to explore this Not having a large group of friends on FB, I saw that I needed to make connections, so started joining groups and sharing thoughts with others who had references things like cancer and CRUK in their writings, and I was able to spread the message slowly this way.
  • When I launched the 365challenge in August 2008, while I was aware of Facebook, I had rarely used it, and I hadn’t really heard of Twitter. I wanted to use email and the internet as much as possible as I saw this as the way to spread my message. I think somewhere along the way I read, on either/both the CRUK and the JG sites, some tips on using Facebook, so I started to explore this Not having a large group of friends on FB, I saw that I needed to make connections, so started joining groups and sharing thoughts with others who had references things like cancer and CRUK in their writings, and I was able to spread the message slowly this way.
  • I’ll not claim that this lead to huge donations or a load of people taking the 365challenge (yet), but it allowed me to spread the word and invite people to engage with me online and to pass on the links to their groups of friends on FB too. Ripples spreading outwards, occasionally touching someone whom I’d never have encountered, but who could now share my message or even come on board and want to join me in raising funds for CRUK by taking their own 365challenges … a number of my 365ers fit this profile. And as they have come on board, they’ve created their own FB groups, and so the ripples continue to spread … Twitter was a different matter. Once I did start playing with it, however, firstly following a few celebrities, then searching for key words like cancer or CRUK, I began to see just what a powerful tool this was … http://www.flickr.com/photos/twenty_questions/2808819998
  • Colin is one in a million – give even the people who wouldn’t think about these things the tools, advice and support they need. Finally, what would have helped me (or maybe got me further along this process sooner than my own efforts did) … maybe more guidance on how FB can be exploited, an explanation of what Twitter is all about and how to use this to connect with like-minded people, guidance on how following someone can give you access to their followers too (okay, they need to follow you back now, but that’ll happen), tips on keeping your message out there – how regular blog updates can be tweeted about so others get to know that you’ve written something new, changing your FB status regularly and using these status updates and tweets to draw people in, teasing them into reading more …
  • Colin is having a brilliant time. This is user delight – people find running a marathon easy compared to raising money. This is a *good* experience – the kind of thing all websites dream of offering, and you can put people like Colin at the heart of your online strategy and focus on providing the best experiences. I began to follow more people, and as a number of them followed me back, here again I was making connections with like-minded folk, who could spread the word for me on the 365challenge. Looking at who people I was following were following opened more doorways and more connections were made. Twitter was a different matter. Once I did start playing with it, however, firstly following a few celebrities, then searching for key words like cancer or CRUK, I began to see just what a powerful tool this was … Twitter connected me with people who have sponsored me, who have taken the 365challenge on themselves and/or who have promoted the 365challenge on my behalf. These are people who I would NEVER have encountered otherwise, and the connections made will be invaluable both to me and the 365challenge and to CRUK, as this concept is going to grow, partly helped by these enthusiastic strangers, many of whom I now count as supporters and friends, some of whom have gone out of their way to join me in some of my adventures.

JustGiving research @ IoF Insights Annual Conference 2009 JustGiving research @ IoF Insights Annual Conference 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • IoF Insight in Fundraising Annual Conference 2009 JustGiving insight – latest research into online giving habits and demographics
  • Hello! Jonathan Waddingham • Charity Champion at JustGiving • Work with charities to make best use of the web • Research online giving trends to provide insight FLM 2009 report - http://icanhaz.com/flmreport2 Donor attitudes to credit crunch - http://icanhaz.com/crunchJG What charities really think of online fundraising - http://icanhaz.com/JGPF
  • Donor demographics on JustGiving Research details People were prompted to take a survey after making a donation to an online fundraising page Donation could have been made to any size charity in any category Survey carried out from early August to end September 2009 2,820 people took the survey
  • Is this your first online donation?
  • Which gender is giving more?
  • What’s the spread of ages by gender?
  • How much do people donate online?
  • Donation share vs revenue share
  • Key stats Percentage (in revenue) that comes from 25% donors over 45 who donate more than £50 33% Percentage (in revenue) that comes from donors over 55 Percentage (in revenue) that comes from 11% donors over 65
  • Donation spread by age and gender
  • Donation spread by age and gender
  • How do you help these people? accessible email advertise targeted integrate online/offline user-friendly
  • What was the source of the donation ask?
  • Looking at past trends... http://weblogs.hitwise.com/robin-goad/2007/09/facebook_and_charities.html
  • Looking at current trends...
  • Is email use increasing or decreasing? http://icanhaz.com/emailstats
  • Do the tools used vary depending on age?
  • Facebook – where the new breed lives Percentage of Facebook visits from Facebook home page 60% Percentage of Facebook visits 2% from Facebook inbox
  • Facebook – some facts 316 million users 50% of active users log on in any given day 23 M users in UK www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics
  • Who is using Facebook Connect? http://developers.facebook.com/connect.php http://icanhaz.com/fbconnect
  • Facebook Connect & JustGiving http://icanhaz.com/connectJG
  • Facebook Connect & Amnesty www.protectthehuman.com
  • Twitter – fastest growing website in UK 13th most popular site in UK http://icanhaz.com/twitwise www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/GB
  • Community fundraising through Twitter http://twitter.com/serafinowicz/status/1321093848
  • Community fundraising through Twitter 14% of referrals on 13th March to JustGiving were from Twitter
  • Fundraising through Twitter – micro donations 1,106 donations £4.86 average Current total: £5,396.07
  • Fundraising through Twitter – celebs http://twitter.com/stephenfry/status/2614040531
  • Fundraising through Twitter – celebs 81 countries
  • Fundraising through Twitter – celebs Donations were made by 39 people at www.justgiving.com/melcupper From the tweet, £470 was donated at an average of £12 http://icanhaz.com/frytweet
  • So what does this all mean? The new breed of social media fundraisers is growing in importance Newsfeeds are the single most valuable real estate on Facebook for charities Different segments require different channels, as well as different messages Test online donation prompts by age and gender (as well as RFV) Ignore your older online donors at your peril Email is still the king of comms for many people online
  • The 365 Challenge www.365challenge.co.uk & @365er
  • This is Colin’s story “In 2007, I was diagnosed with a soft tissue sarcoma and underwent surgery, followed by radiotherapy. Then in 2008, my sister, Brenda Carr, died after a long battle with breast cancer. Following on from this, I knew that I wanted to raise money to support Cancer Research UK, because I felt that they were supporting important work in the fight to overcome cancer.”
  • Colin’s strategy Wanted to use email and internet to spread message Engage Heard with about interested Facebook, target audience explored it Colin Looked for people Set up on Facebook own talking about Cancer, joined Facebook their groups and started group conversation
  • Colin’s strategy “With a group, I found that I could engage with a target audience who had expressed an interest in what I was doing – what any advertiser dreams of, really!”
  • The ripple effect…
  • What would’ve helped Colin more guidance on how FB can be exploited an explanation of what Twitter is all about guidance on how following someone can give you access to their followers too tips on keeping your message out there – how regular blog updates can be tweeted about so others get to know that you’ve written something new, changing your Facebook status regularly and using these status updates and tweets to draw people in, teasing them into reading more …
  • The new breed “As I posted Tweets about hitting milestones or new blogs, these connections were Re-Tweeting them, and my message spread further and further.” “These enthusiastic strangers... I now count as supporters and friends”
  • You can find me here… Jonathan Waddingham jonathan@justgiving.com @jon_bedford http://charities.justgiving.com slideshare.net/jwaddingham http://icanhaz.com/PFJW