Designing the Intangible: an Introduction to Service Design

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Designing the Intangible: an Introduction to Service Design

  1. 1. Designing the intangible An introduction to service design Jennifer Bove & Ben Fullerton
  2. 2. 1. What? 2. Why? 3. How? 4. Case studies 5. What makes a good service experience? 6. Any questions?
  3. 3. 1. What? 2. Why? 3. How? 4. Case studies 5. What makes a good service experience? 6. Any questions?
  4. 4. 2 definitions:
  5. 5. “Service design: A method for designing experiences that reach people through many different touch-points, and that happen over time.” from: http://servicedesign.org/service_design/
  6. 6. “Service design can be both tangible and intangible. It can involve artefacts and other things including communication, environment and behaviours. Whichever form it takes, it must be consistent, easy to use and have strategic alliance.” from: “Total Design: Managing the Design Process in the Service Sector”. W & G Hollins, 1990
  7. 7. Let’s unpack those statements a bit.
  8. 8. “Intangible.”
  9. 9. “Many different touch-points.”
  10. 10. “Over time.”
  11. 11. image courtesy of live|work Studio Ltd. - http://www.livework.co.uk
  12. 12. What else?
  13. 13. Services are produced at the same moment as they are consumed - the customer is a “co-creator” of the service.
  14. 14. Services can be constantly monitored against success factors and incrementally improved “on the fly”.
  15. 15. 1. What? 2. Why? 3. How? 4. Case studies 5. What makes a good service experience? 6. Any questions?
  16. 16. e “service industry” accounts for around 75% of the Western economy (currently!)
  17. 17. But services are rarely designed with the same care and attention to detail as products.
  18. 18. Better designed services lead to greater customer loyalty - from customers who pay more! - and more efficient business processes.
  19. 19. Service envy!
  20. 20. And by promoting use over consumption - encouraging people to use services rather than products - we also promote sustainability
  21. 21. 1. What? 2. Why? 3. How? 4. Case studies 5. What makes a good service experience? 6. Any questions?
  22. 22. Service design isn’t a new discipline.
  23. 23. e thinking, tools and methodologies come from interaction design - for so ware and products - so the process looks somewhat the same...
  24. 24. small man courtesy of live|work Studio Ltd. - http://www.livework.co.uk
  25. 25. Design research: Internal (to the business) and external (to the customer and the world the service will exist in)
  26. 26. Example deliverables might include:
  27. 27. Personas
  28. 28. Service Ecology courtesy of live|work Studio Ltd. - http://www.livework.co.uk
  29. 29. Essentially, design for opportunities: unmet customer and business needs.
  30. 30. Example deliverables might include:
  31. 31. Service Blueprint courtesy of live|work Studio Ltd. - http://www.livework.co.uk
  32. 32. Experience Prototype courtesy of live|work Studio Ltd. - http://www.livework.co.uk
  33. 33. Storytelling (Scenarios)
  34. 34. Touch-point Specifications
  35. 35. Go into production.
  36. 36. Release and monitor.
  37. 37. Techniques for doing this include:
  38. 38. RATER (SERVQUAL): Reliable Assurance Tangibles Empathy Responsiveness
  39. 39. Take learnings from this back into discovery, iterate, and improve!
  40. 40. 1. What? 2. Why? 3. How? 4. Case studies 5. What makes a good service experience? 6. Any questions?
  41. 41. 3 examples of real world services designed in a customer-centric way
  42. 42. Case Study 1 “My BAA” live|work, London, UK
  43. 43. “Raise awareness of the BAA brand in the mind of the traveller.”
  44. 44. We visited Heathrow.
  45. 45. We talked to passengers.
  46. 46. “ at’s BAA.”
  47. 47. We created personas
  48. 48. We created a framework based on the existing customer journey
  49. 49. We used that framework to generate service propositions
  50. 50. en we illustrated what those propositions might look like
  51. 51. We also created business rationale and principles
  52. 52. And finally, we walked our personas through their new travel experience.
  53. 53. Case Study 2 “Favor Link” IDII, Italy
  54. 54. “Make the day to day life of the working mother just a little bit easier”
  55. 55. We interviewed working moms
  56. 56. We mapped their routines
  57. 57. en we analyzed their days
  58. 58. We created user scenarios
  59. 59. And designed a service concept
  60. 60. We created an experience prototype
  61. 61. And created interface designs
  62. 62. We tested the application with mothers
  63. 63. Case Study 3 Streetcar live|work, London, UK
  64. 64. “Improve the customer experience of a great idea.”
  65. 65. We mapped and evaluated the existing experience...
  66. 66. ...and highlighted “pain points” where the experience could be improved.
  67. 67. We created a service blueprint to describe how the service should behave.
  68. 68. ...and that helped to focus on those touch-points that needed improving.
  69. 69. Following these improvements, Streetcar became the fastest growing car club in Europe.
  70. 70. 1. What? 2. Why? 3. Case studies 4. What makes a good service experience? 5. Any questions?
  71. 71. 6 opportunities for designing service quality
  72. 72. 1. Responsiveness
  73. 73. Design for different circumstances.
  74. 74. Services are multi-functional
  75. 75. Services are multi-functional
  76. 76. Services are multi-functional
  77. 77. Services are multi-functional
  78. 78. 2. Consistency
  79. 79. Tangible evidence tells customers what kind of service to expect.
  80. 80. 3. Adaptable
  81. 81. Services should anticipate potential fail points.
  82. 82. 4. Tailored
  83. 83. A service can learn from customer behavior and anticipate needs.
  84. 84. 5. Efficient
  85. 85. Getting the internal business processes right will create a more consistent customer experience.
  86. 86. 6. Rewarding
  87. 87. Service loyalty can be designed into the details.
  88. 88. another example of a reward
  89. 89. 1. Responsive 2. Consistent 3. Adaptable 4. Tailored 5. Efficient 6. Rewarding
  90. 90. 1. What? 2. Why? 3. Case studies 4. What makes a good service experience? 5. Any questions?

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