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Getting started with Job to be Done research

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Getting started with Job to be Done research

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To build a successful new product or service you need to make something people will buy. Jobs to be Done help you to understand why people buy the products they do, and make something they will be willing to pay a premium price for. Learn how, at our Jobs to be Done workshop. We run our workshop monthly, more information: https://goo.gl/jvhnVM

To build a successful new product or service you need to make something people will buy. Jobs to be Done help you to understand why people buy the products they do, and make something they will be willing to pay a premium price for. Learn how, at our Jobs to be Done workshop. We run our workshop monthly, more information: https://goo.gl/jvhnVM

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Getting started with Job to be Done research

  1. 1. JobstobeDone Creating real value for your customers by knowing their Jobs to be Done.
  2. 2. Jobs to be Done help you to create real value for your customers, and create a service they are willing to pay a premium price for.
  3. 3. Customer Discovery Customer
 Validation Customer
 Creation Company
 Building
  4. 4. Customer Discovery Customer
 Validation Customer
 Creation Company
 Building
  5. 5. Customer Discovery Customer
 Validation Customer
 Creation Company
 Building
  6. 6. Whatare JobstobeDone?
  7. 7. Wedefineajobastheprogress thatapersonistryingtomake inaparticularcircumstance. Clayton Christensen, author of Innovators Dilemma
  8. 8. It is about understanding what causes people to hire the services they do.
  9. 9. What we hire depends upon our goals and circumstances at that time.
  10. 10. A Job to be Done entails: • Goal - the progress someone is trying to make • Actions - what someone is doing to get there • Pains - obstacles and unwanted outcomes • Gains - factors helping to progress and positive outcomes
  11. 11. Example: • Goal - getting to work on time • Actions - checking for traffic jams, taking the car, taking a faster route • Pains - “There are always traffic jams”, “I can’t work in the car” • Gains - “I can leave whenever I want”, “I have a moment on my own”
  12. 12. Example: • Goal - getting a good night’s sleep • Actions - drinking chamomile tea, reading a book, setting an alarm, going to bed • Pains - “My neighbours have loud parties”, “Light early in the morning wakes me up”, “Without enough sleep I can’t function well” • Gains - “Sleeping well makes me more productive”, “It makes me less stressed”, “A quiet evening schedule helps”
  13. 13. Jobs to be Done vs. Actions
  14. 14. “I want to mow the lawn.” “I want to keep the grass short and tidy.” vs.
  15. 15. Youhavetodrilldeepandlookwide, identifyingnotonlythefunctional,but alsothesocialandemotionaldimensions. Clayton Christensen, author of Innovators Dilemma
  16. 16. Categorising Jobs to be Done: • Main Job to be Done - the progress someone is trying to make • Related Job to be Done - goals in conjunction with the main JTBD • Functional aspects - practical and objective requirements • Emotional aspects • Personal aspect - how one feels about the solution • Social aspect - how one believes he/she is perceived using the solution
  17. 17. Example: • Main Job to be Done - getting to work in time • Related Job to be Done - getting updated on the news • Functional aspects - needs to get from A to B • Emotional aspect • Personal aspect - wants to have a moment on her own • Social aspect - wants to be seen as a professional
  18. 18. Example: • Main Job to be Done - getting work done • Related Job to be Done - getting food • Functional aspects - place should have place to work, wifi, power outlets • Emotional aspect • Personal aspect - should make me feel comfortable • Social aspect - should give me a sense of privacy
  19. 19. Example: • Main Job to be Done - getting to know interesting new people for network • Related Job to be Done - getting inspired • Functional aspects - should get me into contact with new people in my field, should allow me to hold a conversation with these people • Emotional aspect • Personal aspect - should make me feel welcome • Social aspect - should make me look competent in my field
  20. 20. What service do we choose to hire?
  21. 21. It depends upon your goals and our environment
  22. 22. Factors in our environment can act as: • Pushes - pushing us to go look for another solution • Pulls - convincing us to start using a new solution
  23. 23. Example: • Pushes - “there are too many traffic jams” • Pulls - “I can work while sitting in the train!”
  24. 24. Example: • Pushes - “My phone’s battery keeps dying, it’s unreliable.”, “I cannot install the latest apps” • Pulls - “If it gets stolen I won’t lose a lot of money as it’s an old phone anyway”, “I’d like to be able to store more”
  25. 25. But there are counteracting forces…
  26. 26. The Progress Forces Diagram
  27. 27. The Progress Forces Diagram
  28. 28. The Progress Forces Diagram
  29. 29. The Progress Forces Diagram
  30. 30. The Progress Forces Diagram
  31. 31. Howtodiscover JobstobeDone
  32. 32. Good preparation is half the work, what are we looking for?
  33. 33. Finding out why people choose to hire the products they do.
  34. 34. Discovering the goals and circumstances that influence these choices.
  35. 35. Focus on a hiring decision.
  36. 36. Why did they hire that service?
  37. 37. Big hires vs. Small hires
  38. 38. Observing • Behaviour is more reliable than opinion • Environment tells a lot • Noticing small details people often forget
  39. 39. Interviewing • Focus on past hiring decisions • Find out what led up to the hire • Discover emotional aspects • The why?
  40. 40. Make a timeline
  41. 41. • Times • Places • People • Actions • Services Ask for
  42. 42. Source: jobstobedone.org
  43. 43. Source: jobstobedone.org
  44. 44. Source: jobstobedone.org
  45. 45. Source: jobstobedone.org
  46. 46. Source: jobstobedone.org
  47. 47. Let’s take an example
  48. 48. “We’re going to try to map out a typical day in your life, see when you listen to music and why you do so at these moments.”
  49. 49. “Could you describe yesterday? What did you do in the morning, in the afternoon? Where did you go?”
  50. 50. “Were you listening to music? When? Where were you?”
  51. 51. “What were you listening to? Why?”
  52. 52. “For how long did you use it?”
  53. 53. “Did you do anything else while listening to music?”
  54. 54. “What did you use to listen to music? Why?”
  55. 55. “What did you use to listen to music? Why?”
  56. 56. “What did you use to listen to music? Why?” etc…
  57. 57. You learn by doing.
  58. 58. Long interviews vs. Short interviews
  59. 59. Interviewing the right people • Go to a spot where your customers are likely to be • Interview people who have chosen to hire your product • Attract interested people with an event or landing page • Use a set of questions to filter out people
  60. 60. Analysingdatato uncoverJobstobeDone
  61. 61. What are we looking for?
  62. 62. To gain a deep understanding of people’s lives, what progress they’re trying to make and under what circumstances.
  63. 63. Jobs to be Done: • Goal - the progress someone is trying to make • Actions - what someone is doing to get there • Pains - obstacles and unwanted outcomes • Gains - factors helping to progress and positive outcomes
  64. 64. Jobs to be Done emerge from patterns across interviews.
  65. 65. We perform a cluster analysis to find patterns in qualitative data.
  66. 66. “The train is often delayed” “It’s not reliable”“It’s lost time” “My transfer times are too short” “I can’t work because it’s too busy to sit” “I have too many transfers” Finding the common thread
  67. 67. Hierarchical cluster analysis
  68. 68. “I want proper office equipment” “I want to get the information I need” “I want to get my work done” Hierarchies in Jobs to be Done
  69. 69. Howtoimplement JobstobeDone
  70. 70. I have my Jobs to be Done: Now what?
  71. 71. Thejobspecisfromtheinnovator’spoint ofview:WhatdoIneedtodesign, develop,anddeliverinmynewproduct offeringsothatitsolvestheconsumer’s jobwell? Clayton Christensen, author of Innovators Dilemma
  72. 72. Experiment! Can I replicate my findings in experiments? • Create a landing page • Check whether people are willing to pay
  73. 73. If you’ve confirmed your findings…
  74. 74. Identify opportunities for innovation • Lots of pushes • Cobbled up solutions • Non-consuming
  75. 75. Identify your real competitors
  76. 76. Adapt your marketing • Pick your channels • Advertise with the Job to be Done you can solve • Talk in the words of your customer
  77. 77. Shape your customer journey • Identify critical moments • Take away obstacles • Alleviate doubts
  78. 78. We are standing on the shoulders of giants Belowis alistofpeoplewewanttoattributeto: Clayton Christensen • CompetingAgainstLuck Steve Blank • CustomerDevelopment Tony Ulwick • Jobs tobeDone:TheorytoPractice Alan Klement • WhenCoffeeand KaleCompete Chris Spiek • UnpackingTheProgressMaking ForcesDiagram(jobstobedone.org) • TheJobs-to-be-DoneMattressInterviews (jobstobedone.org)
  79. 79. Thanks. EvelienAl evelien@firmhouse.com

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