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  • 1 - Supporting institutions in sustainable systems and ICT strategies for the enhanced management and exploitation of knowledge assets. 2 - Facilitate BCE collaboration and provision of service across and between institutions through enabling systems and technology. 3 - Supporting and guiding institutions in making the process and technological changes (driven by strategic goals) to sustain efficient, effective BCE. 4 - Enabling richer & more efficient, productive knowledge exchange & learning partnerships between institutions & BCE partners 5 - Ensuring internal change & education within JISC with aim of embedding BCE in its operations, in Innovation and Services 6 - Basis of evidence for investment and effectiveness of investment

Transcript

  • 1. JISC Business and Community Engagement Benefits of Embedding BCE Simon Whittemore JISC Executive JISC Advisory Services’ Embedding Business and Community Engagement dissemination event 10 December 2009 http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/bce.aspx
  • 2. What we mean by Business and Community Engagement (BCE)?
    • Strategic management of relationships* with external partners and clients, and of the associated services.
    Covers 4 closely-related institutional Strategic Areas*: Knowledge transfer/ exchange (KE) Employer Engagement (EE) Public/ Community Engagement (PE) Lifelong Learning (LL) Typically services such as: CPD, workforce development (EE); Consultancy, collaborative research (KE) Public lectures, events, festivals etc. (PE); Community-based learning (LL)
  • 3. JISC Business and Community Engagement (BCE): Why? Wider benefits: Highly skilled, versatile workforce; innovative, sustainable business economy; cohesive and inclusive society. Institutional benefits Efficiency use of information + resources hence better effort-outcome ratio Cohesion cross-dept reporting, interoperability, cross-selling, shared purpose Sustainability market position, reduced gap: strategic intent-operational reality Policy-driven programme: e.g. Leitch, Innovation Nation, Foster, CBI HE Task Force Stronger Together’, HE Framework ….
  • 4. Business and Community Engagement – Enabling effective interaction JISC: Supporting BCE, enhancing infrastructure and service-provision; overcoming barriers Virtual collaborative facilities for institution/ external partner co-development External access to HE/FE knowledge + information resources Service-orientated, interoperable systems to manage relationships + create business intelligence HE/FE KNOWLEDGE & EXPERTISE Education, Research BUSINESS & COMMUNITY DEMAND Problem/need or opportunity Engagement Practitioners Facilitation, Translation, Service ; Prognosis, diagnosis of opportunity, need
  • 5. JISC Business and Community Engagement (BCE) Programme 2008-11– Streams and Key Work-packages CRM Employer E n g a g e m e n t Online Tools for BCE Embedding BCE Supporting Training & CPD Extending Access Mgt Business Info Resources Facilitating Open Innovation SME e-empowering VREs* for BCE *Virtual Research Environments Awareness in BCE in JISC Comms. & Marketing Needs Analysis Formative + Summative Evaluation Analysis of Online Promotion of Research Expertise 5 - EMBEDDING AND COMMUNICATING BCE 4 - ENABLING THE INTERFACE 3 - ENABLING CHANGE 2 - FACILITATING COLLABORATION 1 - ENHANCING KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT 6 - NEEDS ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION
  • 6. Institutional Business and Community Engagement: key considerations
    • Strategic direction and preparation for change
    • Organisational infrastructure, capability and capacity building (engagement professionals)
    • Alignment and support of administrative and business functions (HR, libraries, estates, finance/procurement etc)
    • Engagement and active endorsement of academic functions (shared mission)
    • Business processes and procedures (new and distinct from those supporting teaching and research)
    • Information management strategy and IT enablers (knowledge mgt, CRM)
    • Marketing, customer/partner value, relationship mgt, service mgt
    • Results and evaluation
  • 7. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Competitive advantage in global ‘knowledge economy’
    • Creators and disseminators of a unique range of knowledge
    • There is a growing dependence on knowledge as added economic value
    • Information is no longer sufficient; information society: saturation
    • Knowledge leaks - as companies find, hence open innovation; institutions can offer controlled knowledge sharing (two-way)
    • International opportunities – online presence
    • Ultimate consultancy – combining knowledge disciplines, bespoke solutions, new markets, new opportunities
  • 8. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Competitive advantage in global ‘knowledge economy’
    • ‘ The Internet and related ICTs are arguably the most important platform for innovation today, enabling flows of knowledge and linking innovators around the world’. OECD Interim Report on OECD Innovation Strategy
  • 9. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Manage and adapt to change (economic, funding, policy)
    • Agile institutions need an engagement strategy
      • Coherent, joined-up approach to external engagement; infrastructure, defined processes and responsibilities
    • And an information management strategy
      • Interoperability across systems; data sharing; data integrity
    • Playing to strengths, internal strategic rationale (mixed portfolio)
      • Resilience, reduced risk and exposure to funding changes
    • Business efficiency
  • 10. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Manage and adapt to change (economic, funding, policy)
    • ‘ Continue to address their cost bases, making efficiency savings where possible’ (Recommendation nine of CBE HE task Force Report).
    • ‘… universities themselves will have to be more efficient and effective. Universities already need to be rigorous in withdrawing from activities of lower priority and value, so that they can invest more in higher priority programmes’. Higher Ambitions
  • 11. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Added business value:
    • market niche and differentiation; business sustainability
    • extended and enhanced profile; strategic engagement; improved reputation
    • resource exchange and staff development – secondments, shadowing etc
    • business opportunities (consultancy, CPD etc) and revenue/benefits in kind
    • student pipeline through (lifelong learning, CPD, enhanced reputation/profile)
    • alumni development (contacts via business partnerships )
  • 12. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Added business value
    Develop models of good practice for the movement of staff between businesses and universities (Recommendation 14, Stronger Together, CBI HE task Force Report) ‘ structured partnerships with the business community…..of strategic importance’; EC, Modernisation of European Universities 2006
  • 13. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Easier reporting, more informed + resource-efficient strategic decision-making
    • Requires information gathering and sharing across departments/faculties
    • Requires managed resource utilisation in engagement activities
    • Requires record keeping of engagement activities
    • Enables strategic intelligence
    • Enables resource efficiency
  • 14. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Easier reporting, more informed + resource-efficient strategic decision-making;
    • ‘ requires universities to overcome their fragmentation into faculties, departments, laboratories and administrative units and to target their efforts collectively on institutional priorities for research, teaching and services’. EC, Modernisation of European Universities 2006
  • 15. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • More agile + visible institutional services for business and community orgs.
    • Institutional services and expertise promoted online
    • Public engagement
    • Marketing; referrals to other institutions/agencies
    • Complementary local partnerships – HE/FE collaborations; diff types of institution/diff. strengths
    • Mixed portfolio of services – CPD, consultancy, collaborative research, public events, community education – co-ordinated through one central function
  • 16. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • More agile + visible institutional services for business and community orgs.
    • ‘ universities need to communicate the relevance of their activities, particularly those related to research, by sharing knowledge with society’; EC, Modernisation of European Universities 2006 ‘locally accessible higher education that can create new opportunities for individuals and their communities. This will be achieved, as resources allow, through innovative partnerships between universities and further education colleges.’ Higher Ambitions
  • 17. Benefits of Strategic Business and Community Engagement for institutions?
    • Among the 12 ‘key issues for effective workforce development partnerships’ identified in CBI/UUK Report Stepping Higher are:
    • ‘ Having the right infrastructure to respond to employers’;
    • ‘ The right people to deliver the programmes’;
    • ‘ Better mutual understanding – between universities and employers…’;
    • ‘ Recognising both the employer and learners as clients in different ways’;
    • ‘ Building wider support for employer engagement within universities and recognition of the value of skill enhancement within businesses’;
    • Delivering programmes in ways that suit employers and participants’;
    • ‘ Working out the funding mix’. The same isssues for knowledge transfer exchange….
  • 18. Challenges for institutions?
    • Translating strategic intent into operational reality
    • Building shared sense of purpose around BCE (diversity of BCE roles)
    • Institution-wide view needed, e.g. Reporting, CRM; offers and services
    • Cultural + org. change + new skills needed - integrated into existing structures
    • Central services/policies (e.g. Library, IT) do not enable external service delivery: hence often peripheral, disconnected BCE
  • 19.  
  • 20. For Reference : Examples of Institutional Business and Community Engagement Activities
    • Covers 4 Institutional Strategic Areas where the partner or client is external: 1. Knowledge Transfer/Exchange, 2. Employer Engagement, 3. Public/ Community Engagement, 4. Lifelong Learning – the constituency is external
    • Activities are both research-led and education-led - with emphasis on service provision and demand-led service. Examples:
      • Consultancy
      • Collaborative research; Contract research
      • Start-up companies and spin-off companies
      • Alumni services
      • CPD and training services
      • Workforce development; Work-based learning; Work placements
      • Lifelong learning;
      • Enterprise facilities, activities and education
      • Incubation facilities and services;
      • Licensing of content and knowledge assets
      • Regional development and Regeneration
      • Public engagement events, festivals & facilities utilising the institution’s intellectual assets:
        • public lectures; performing arts; exhibitions – museums/galleries; museum education.
      • Social entrepreneurship/corporate social responsibility;
      • Volunteering schemes;
      • Public service activities such as:
        • Food and diet improvement; Health awareness programmes; Problem solving - crime, narcotics etc.; Services for targeted groups e.g. IT for the elderly.