“Like human beings,
 all brands are born equal.
 The trick is to prove
 one isn’t. Branding is the
 art and science of
 id...
Copyright © 2003, 2005, 2008, 2009
Idris Mootee

All rights reserved. Published by
Idea Couture Inc. No part of this publi...
Contents:

Introduction 4
All About Brands 7
Branding in a Postmodern Culture 39
Strategic Perspectives of Branding 49
Man...
IntroductIon
This book is about only one thing: brands,
branding and the only sustainable form of
leadership in an economy...
all about
    brands




6               7
LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE       LOVE
                                    ...
VE        LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   ...
VE        LOVE       LOVE             LOVE        LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE   LOVE
OU         YOU    ...
a brand Is not…                                                                    a brand Is…
A TRADE MARk               ...
BRANDS
HAVE ALMOST
BECOME
IDEOLOGIES.




16            17
“The art of marketing
      is the art of brand
      building. If you are not
      a brand, you are a
      commodity. T...
To plan for one year,
What Is a brand?

                                                                                  ...
1.               2.                                      the customer
                                                    ...
brand                                                                    In a world predisposed to sameness, there
       ...
too much                                                                          the most common
advertIsIng WIth too    ...
Why brands are In                                                                                                What Is a...
What is a Brand?                                                                                                          ...
mInd over matter                                               Advantages built on emotional values and
                  ...
products vs.
brands




                   A product is built
                                             A brand is buil...
mInd over matter                                                                                    buIldIng strong
      ...
brandIng
     In a
     postmodern
     culture




38            39
brandIng In the age                                                                                                       ...
dIstrIbutIon Is nothIng                                   content Is everythIng
When distribution is trivial, unlimited an...
the personal brand                                                                                                        ...
savIng your                                                                                      can socIal medIa
        ...
strategIc
     perspectIves
     of
     brandIng




48              49
“We have a surplus                          “We also have a surplus                                                       ...
brandIng and                                                                                                              ...
customer                                                         fournIer’s                                               ...
rIse and rIse
of the brand
The very technologies that make it faster,
easier and cheaper to innovate also
help us to imita...
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.

195,616

Published on

This book includes the very latest thinking on branding and brand strategy. It has been published in different many languages and use by top global brands to train their brand managers. New updated hard cover version is not available from Amazon May 2013
Pls view in full screen mode. Published in more than 5 languages.

Published in: Business
636 Comments
2.3k Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
195,616
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
134
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11,105
Comments
636
Likes
2,323
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

60 Minute Brand Strategist: Extended and updated hard cover NOW available.

  1. 1. “Like human beings, all brands are born equal. The trick is to prove one isn’t. Branding is the art and science of identifying and fulfilling human physical and emotional needs by capturing attention, imagination and emotion long enough to make money from it.” – Idris Mootee 1 2
  2. 2. Copyright © 2003, 2005, 2008, 2009 Idris Mootee All rights reserved. Published by Idea Couture Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photo- copying, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107, 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher. Request to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permission Department at permission@ideacouture.com. Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and author have used their best efforts in preparing this book, they make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specifically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor author shall be liable for any loss of profit or any commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages. A number of brand names and trademarks are mentioned and used in this book are protected under copyright laws and international treaty provisions. All trademarks, services marks, trade names, logos and icons are proprietary to their respective owner. Their inclusion in this book is for the purpose of criticism and illustration only. 60-Minute Brand Strategist – Limited Edition Book and cover design: Sali Tabacchi 3 1
  3. 3. Contents: Introduction 4 All About Brands 7 Branding in a Postmodern Culture 39 Strategic Perspectives of Branding 49 Managing Brand Meaning 79 Brand Leadership 119 Luxury Brand Marketing 133 2 3
  4. 4. IntroductIon This book is about only one thing: brands, branding and the only sustainable form of leadership in an economy ruled by ideas – brand innovation and leadership. Its been 8 years since 60-minute Brand Strategist was first published as a book. Adapted from slides I used in my Advanced Branding Seminar, the first edition was translated and published in several languages, including Japanese, Chinese and German. Dr. Morgan Gerard collaborates with me to develop this limited edition, updated and abridged version by popular demand. We decided to select a few of the book’s chapters that deliver the essence of the concepts. These concepts and techniques are used by the world’s most successful and valuable brands. But you’ll rarely, if ever, read much about these concepts in business magazines. Why? Simply put, they’re trade secrets. Well-wielded branding tools and techniques are powerful, competitive weapons used to win the hearts and minds of customers. Time and again, they help defeat the competition. Consider what follows a battle plan designed to inspire, act as a reminder, function as a tool kit and be drawn upon as a reference that should sit on every marketing and brand executive’s desk. Idris Mootee, CEO Idea Couture Inc. 4 5
  5. 5. all about brands 6 7
  6. 6. LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU What Is a brand? I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE In a world where brands rule, products YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU are no longer bundles of functional characteristics but rather means to provide and enhance customer experiences. Thanks to the internet and wireless tech- I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE nologies, information is so abundant YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU that consumers are overloaded. They have more information than they can digest, use, need or even want. Product proliferation creates so many I I I I I I I I I I I I choices that it diminishes our ability to LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE differentiate or choose what we truly value. YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU Brands help us choose. They are invaluable tools that help us break through clutter to make choices based on our experience of I I I I I I I I I I I I and satisfaction with products or services. LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU 8 9 I I I I I I I I I I I I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE
  7. 7. VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I YOU I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU ME YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU 10 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE
  8. 8. VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU There will be a “ I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE time using a OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU logo will be the “In technocratic and colorless worst thing I I I I I I I I I times, brands bring warmth, YOU VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE ME, familiarity and trust.” OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU TOO in the world.” – Peter Brabeck, Nestle I I I I I I I I I I I I – Bill Bernbach, VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE Founder DDB OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU We’re a long long way from that day. The truth is that people like brands. They I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE not only simplify choices and guarantee OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU quality, but they also add fun and interest, provide aspirations and dreams. Some people love them like children, which might explain why I personally know of a 4-year I I I I I I I I I I I I old boy named Nike, an 8-year old named VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE Ferrari and a 12-year old girl named Hermès. OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU LOGO I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE OU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU YOU 12 13 I I I I I I I I I I I I VE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE
  9. 9. a brand Is not… a brand Is… A TRADE MARk POINT OF VIEW (These are legal properties.) Branding is a strategic point of view, not a select set of marketing activities. A MISSION STATEMENT (This is a reminder.) CUSTOMER VALUE Branding is central to creating customer A LOGO OR SLOGAN value, not just sound bites and images. (These are your signatures.) COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE A PRODUCT OR SERVICE Branding is a key tool for creating and (These are just the tangibles.) sustaining competitive advantages. ADVERTISING ENGINEERED (They deliver your messages.) Brand strategies must be “engineered” into the strategic planning process. ALIVE Brands get their identity from meanings. Products and services are the blood of a brand. Your organizational culture and standards for action are the heartbeat. LOGIC AND EMOTION Branding is part science and part art. ITEM WORkING ITEM WORkING IN ISOLATION IN ISOLATION A BRAND IS MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS. ITEM WORkING ITEM WORkING IN ISOLATION IN ISOLATION 14 15
  10. 10. BRANDS HAVE ALMOST BECOME IDEOLOGIES. 16 17
  11. 11. “The art of marketing is the art of brand building. If you are not a brand, you are a commodity. Then price is everything and the low-cost producer is the only winner.” – Philip kotler, kellogg 18 19
  12. 12. To plan for one year, What Is a brand? grow sales. “A brand is the ‘personification of a product, service, or even entire company.’ Like any person, a brand has a physical To plan for three years, ‘body’: in P&G’s case, the products and/or services it provides. Also, like a person, a brand has a name, a personality, character grow channel. and a reputation. Like a person, you can respect, like and even love a brand. You can think of it To plan for decades, as a deep personal friend, or merely an acquaintance. You can view it as dependable grow a brand. or undependable; principled or opportunistic; caring or capricious. Just as you like to be around certain people and not others, so also do you like to be with certain brands and not others. Also, like a person, a brand must mature and change its product over time. But its character, and core beliefs shouldn’t change. Neither should its fundamental personality and outlook on life. People have character…so do brands. A person's character flows from his/her integrity: the ability to deliver under pressure, the willingness to do what is right rather than what is expedient. You judge a person’s character by his/her past performance and the way he/she thinks and acts in both good times, and especially bad. The same are true of brands.” – Robert Blanchard, former P&G executive BRAND CHANNEL SALES VALUE 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 YEARS 20 21
  13. 13. 1. 2. the customer satIsfactIon What is the What is our core treadmIll deep need that competence? Daniel kahneman of Princeton describes the Customer Satisfaction Treadmill. we satisfy? What are we The more we make, the more we spend, the more we want. The faster we get it, the faster we want it. The more convenient What is our really good at? it becomes, the more we realize just how convenient it could be. The more raison d’être? our unreasonable demands are met, the more unreasonable they become. METAPHYSICAL NEEDS EXPERIENTAL NEEDS SYMBOLIC NEEDS FUNCTIONAL NEEDS 22 23
  14. 14. brand In a world predisposed to sameness, there are few things in life more satisfying than taxonomIes building brands that disrupt predisposition. Brands move market share. Brands move advertising award judges. Brands move culture. Some do all. Brand has meaning beyond functionality that exists in people's minds. Part art, part science, brand is the difference between a bottle of soda and a bottle of Coke, a computer and an iMac, a cup of coffee and a cup of Starbucks, a car and a Mercedes, a designer’s hand bag and a Hermès Birkin. Brand is the intangible yet visceral impact of a person's subjective experience with the product, the personal memories and cultural associations that orbit around it. Brands are also about messages – strong, exciting, distinct, authentic messages that tell people who you are, what you think and why you do what you do. BRANDS THAT FOCUS ON THEIR MEANINGS AND VALUES RATHER THAN FUNCTIONS. BRANDS THAT BRANDS THAT HAVE ALMOST BECOME ARE TIGHTLY IDENTIFIED PRODUCT PRODUCT- WITH THE PRODUCT INDEPENDENT OR RANGE OF PRODUCTS BRANDS THAT FOCUS LARGELY ON THEIR CORE FUNCTIONS AND PURPOSES 24 25
  15. 15. too much the most common advertIsIng WIth too Issues WIth brandIng lIttle meanIng? Cannot justify the cost for brand re-positioning. Where’s the ROI? Management does CUSTOMER VALUE not understand why we need to have BRAND MEANING a brand strategy. BRAND ADVERTISING CUSTOMER VALUE BRAND MEANING BRAND ADVERTISING Management thinks branding is just another logo with a Sales and marketing new tag line. aren’t reading the same book, let alone the same page. Brand vision and company reality do not match. 26 27
  16. 16. Why brands are In What Is a brand? trouble? Don’t make the mistake of letting brand image take over and become brand identity. It’s only part of the equation, not the answer. BRANDS ARE BEING BRANDS STRUGGLE MASS-PRODUCED TO FIND THEIR IN BRAND FACTORIES OWN IDENTITIES There’s a movement of Too many me-too conservatism in brands and too brand investment. Many much me-too advertising. have gone from inspirational Many brands and daring to cautionary have lost their souls. CORPORATE INTERNAL and risk averse. STRATEGY BRANDING Everyone is looking for a save formula. brand strategy BRAND IMAGE BRAND CUSTOMER IDENTITY ENGAGEMENT BRANDS HAVE LOST BRANDS ARE WORN THEIR MYSTIqUE FROM OVERUSE Consumers understand As brand manuals gets how marketing works thicker and heavier, and they are brand savvy. you know you’re in trouble. BRAND Be careful not to Instructional menus ATTRIBUTES over-market a brand. replace imagination. BRAND ASSOCIATIONS 28 29
  17. 17. What is a Brand? What Is a brand? The trust-based, value-producing Today you may have a name and a A brand is an intangible asset that resides in relationship called a brand is proof that the trademark, but it will take time (and much people’s hearts and minds. It’s defined by company is organizationally aligned to more) before you have a brand. Brand the expectations people have about tangible repeat the process and sustain the values. building is the creation and management of and intangible benefits that are developed Find and establish your niche. Clarify your inward cash flow with brand equity as the over time by communications and, more distinct ability to make an impact. savings account. Managing brand is about importantly, by actions! To build a successful Determine the desired relationship how marketers and consumers collaborate brand means doing the following four things: between your customers/prospects and to create meanings. Brand building is not an 1. MAkIng A proMIse your product. option. roI is only relevant when considering 2. CoMMunICATIng your proMIse Create intangible, emotional bonds alternative marketing programs. Brand 3. keepIng your proMIse through every customer interaction. equity is a big elephant: looking at financial 4. sTrengThenIng your proMIse Like people, brand requires a name, a returns alone is unacceptable. you must personality, a character and a reputation. understand the whole beast. The tangible aspect of your brand is a Brand management is a crucial element promise. What do you do best? What’s the of corporate strategy rather than solely payoff? What can your consumer count a marketing function. It helps a company on? This promise becomes an intrinsic part break away from the pack in creating of your marketing message. In order shareholder value. Brand strategy is the for you to own it, you must communicate viable expression of business strategy. strategically and creatively across a broad media mix. Both your internal and external audiences must be true believers of the promise. And the only way to make them truly believe is to be true about the promise. 1. MAkING A PROMISE 2. COMMUNICATING YOUR PROMISE BRAND STRATEGY CORPORATE STRATEGY 3. kEEPING YOUR PROMISE 4. STRENGTHENING YOUR PROMISE 30 31
  18. 18. mInd over matter Advantages built on emotional values and brand meanings (e.g. Levis, Nike, Starbucks, Coca-Cola, Harley-Davison, Apple, Sony) Psychological differences may seem are often the most durable. insubstantial, but in terms of sustainability, they are often more resilient than functional differences. Intangible emotional associations are difficult to copy: Once an emotional territory is occupied by a well known brand, it is more difficult to displace than a brand with a functional claim. PERSONALITY TRUST TIMELESS UNIqUE 32 33
  19. 19. products vs. brands A product is built A brand is built of trust in a factory. and relationships A product is an object. A brand is a personality. A product is sold by A brand is bought by a merchant. a customer. A product is easily copied A brand is unique. by a competitor. A great brand is timeless. A product is quickly outdated. 34 35
  20. 20. mInd over matter buIldIng strong brands Without the brand, Apple would have been dead. The power of the brand kept Branding is often confused with an them alive during the mid-1990s when advertising campaign or a corporate identity. their products were lackluster. The brand Companies are still turning to branding bought them time until they came out as a panacea. Equally problematic are the with the next runaway hit – the iMac. self-proclaimed branding experts happy For Apple, the brand is always bigger than to sell you pricey snake oil. In novice hands, the product. It is an ideology, a value set. branding becomes a way to obfuscate Apple is about imagination, innovation and relative sameness or make promises that individualism. can’t be fulfilled, instead of communicating It’s not just about advertising or visual relevant uniqueness and building trust identity. Brands must be built 360 degrees. and credibility. Branding means that collateral information, meaning, association and value has been spiced into the very DNA of the brand. This has two core components: label and fable. Label refers to all visual elements, packaging and taglines. Fables are the extrinsic aspect of branding attached from the outside and most often from customer experiences, advertising, corporate trust and customer relationships. The brand is the totality of what the customer experiences: the look and feel of your office, your community reputation, your awning and signage, your sales and customer service people, the way you handle business conflicts and customer complaints. INNOVATION Three key requirements for building strong brands: IMAGINATION 1. Trust between brand and consumer 2. Common identity between brand and consumer 3. Point of difference between brands in a set INDIVIDUALISM 36 37
  21. 21. brandIng In a postmodern culture 38 39
  22. 22. brandIng In the age transformatIon of brand Is a process, transformatIon a performance Brands are transforming themselves. As content is increasingly delivered via To make the story of a brand complete Beyond mere ads and products, they are personalized and self-scheduled social webs, and meaningful, it requires that all of finding new ways to get inside your viewers – not broadcasters – will decide the actors – customers and companies alike home and be a part of your life as branded when, how, why and what is consumed. – successfully complete transitions from content, branded entertainment, branded And they will dictate who they share that scene to scene and stage to stage. In today’s utilities and branded space. L’Equipe, the consumption with. script, those transitions read like this: Parisian based daily sports newspaper, The question is, What role should brand invented the Tour de France for one simple play in this age of transformation? reason: to sell more newspapers, branded content with a pinch of engagement. But customers are transforming brands, too. New cultural modes of performance are emerging from new network-based social behaviors and conversations. With over 50 million people able to share ideas, opinions and experiences in a single online space – and generate billions of web page impressions every month – these behaviors Interruption is the stage Intrusion is the stage Engagement is the curtain call of this and conversations are creating a seismic where old scripts get between what was and what performance. A celebration of the shift in the traditional balance of power that shredded, rules get tossed will be. A wild zone of new new reality and the ideas and rituals once existed between customers and out the window and the ideas and new rituals, it is alive that brought it to life, brands that companies. paradigms we lived by with uncertainty, excitement will occupy centre stage are those are revealed as obsolete. and expectation. This gestative that contribute the new ideas, help facilitate the new rituals, meet the new The Internet is our Inter- space where customers and needs and, ultimately, tell the best ruption. It has forever companies create and explore stories. Those who ignore this new ruptured the old system brand futures is where we reality do so at their own peril. of brand control and are right now. communication. INTERRUPTION INTRUSION ENGAGEMENT 40 41
  23. 23. dIstrIbutIon Is nothIng content Is everythIng When distribution is trivial, unlimited and Great content – the kind that truly engages available to all, marketing to a captive – helps customers tell a story, perform audience sitting on a couch in front of a box a part of their life, communicate meaning to is a thing of the past. In fact, this kind of others and be all that they can be. It is, old-world marketing has become adversarial quite simply, cultural. to customers. Having adapted to the In the past, the clearest demonstration of media-fragmented and always-on new content (and brands) as cultural was in reality, they seek value by searching, the subculture. Punks, mods, ravers, skaters, discovering and sharing their very personal church-goers, artists, bikers and others brand caches with peers – not waiting made commodities come to life through for you to interrupt them with unwanted performances like no other consumers messaging. on earth. Today, because of the scope and Broadcasting is in trouble, and user- reach of social media, we are in an age of generated videos are just the beginning. the post-subcultural. The Hipster, a mash-up The social-casting of YouTube will of subcultural traditions, has become the evolve and, in the process, so too will emblem of insider-ness made accessible to consumer behavior. Instead of passivity, all with the Internet. the experience flow of tomorrow will Just as subculturalists were the creative be characterized by immediacy, flexibility, class of brand dissemination, modification, portability, permeability, fluidity, alteration and transformation, so now are interactivity, mashability and ownerability. the millions of people around the world who, With the emergence and convergence through social media, have access to insider of the mobile phone, the Internet and knowledges, practices, experiences, location-based-systems, consumers also performances and collaborative communities. have immediate access to co-workers, This occurs through YouTube, Flickr, friends and family members. Between Twitter, Facebook and the thousands of online CONTENT getting used to and being born into advice, support, co-creation and retail a connected age, they are naturally and portals. The relentless virtualization of social increasingly drawing on participation life, the marketing of niche-interactions, in various networks for information, the sharing of experiences and the out- assistance, support and recommendations. sourcing of work means that less and less of Creating great products, services and our daily lives are produced and consumed content is paramount. Content? Yes, at home. Rather, we are performing content. An integral part of any product or ourselves more in public, more collabor- service and their related experiences, atively and more than every through customers will consume only what’s relevant the kinds of very social networks that once to them, what best serves them, and what existed solely in subcultures. truly entertains them – not what is marketed to them by you through repetition. Engaging them will require branded experiences rich in content that strengthen contextual involvement and consumer connection. Within such experiences, the density and intensity of polysemic, multi-origin, co-created and fragmented communication will make Baudrillard’s hyper-reality seem as antiquated as TV. 42 43
  24. 24. the personal brand What Is the problem? “We spent eight In the age of the Personal Brand, Many companies are simply not ready to “We hired a brand consultant commoditization is permeating every aspect deal with or anticipate identity obsolescence and developed a great of daily life. Style, taste, identity and like they anticipate the obsolescence of months and a brand strategy. Our ad individuality have become central to what products or business models. Despite the agency went on to create we expect from our experiences in best efforts of management teams, many and produce an ad lot of money on health care, learning, dating, news, clothing, can’t adapt to shifts in the competitive campaign that far exceeded food, travel, home furnishings, com- environment because the required brand- our capability to deliver a brand strategy munication, sports, entertainment, sexuality, driven adaptive response is inconsistent the brand promise. We spirituality, birth, marriage, babies and with the company’s core identity. Any brand ended up with disappointed and all that’s burials. Twenty years ago, in the social exercise will only widen the gap between customers, internal mainstream, this wasn’t the case. Sub- the brand and the corporate core identity. conflicts and brand credibility changed is the culturalists were particularly picky about erosion.” their purchases, but the average – CEO, Telco logo and tagline.” consumer had a less refined sense of assembling their self through products and services. Today, instant communication has – CEO, Financial Services Company blown the doors clear off of the old-world media and advertising industry. Taste gurus, micro-brands, blogs, chatters, Friends, Tweeters, citizen journalists and the searchability of style have forever changed the how, what, where, when and why of consumption. In the new free-for-all of ideas, opinions, reviews and experiences, individuals with greater access to information strive to define and display their Personal Brand, niche is the norm, cool is hyper-commoditized and branding becomes as much a bottom-up phenomenon for customers as a top-down priority for companies Brands One result is that we have become desperate to socialize the profane. Distracted by the pace of change, unfulfilled in our personal lives and feeling disempowered by our work, many of us turn to celebrities, rock stars, designers and brands to cultivate more meaning in life. But when work is empowering and life is meaningful, interest and engagement in high-consumption lifestyles will wane. De-marketing will happen. “I want to be cool.” Until then, a brand’s role is to help to create meanings in everyday life through commodities. Consumers 44 45
  25. 25. savIng your can socIal medIa Many B-school case studies have chronicled brands brought back from the dead. But ZombIe brands save the for every success, there are hundreds of ZombIe brands? failures: companies that tried to revitalize Zombie Brands, Dinosaurs Brands, Ghost old brands by hiring new agencies and Brands or Graveyard Brands are what The Social Media Generation has throwing endless amounts of money into people used to call brands that customers phenomenal influence over the fate of advertising in hopes of rebuilding, even have either completely abandoned or brands. Active, mobile and vocal, when there wasn't a relevant product, service that are simply hanging on by a thread, they share the joys, angers and frustrations or sound strategy behind the initial move. usually at a Dollar Store or at Costco of their daily experiences with anybody How bad is your situation? Here are the three in a totally unrelated product category. and everybody. In doing so, their digital most common scenarios: Some have gone through unsuccessful connectivity becomes the web that weaves revitalization efforts, others exist only in Brand Communities. Separated by emerging markets, a few have simply their geography but bound by their love My brand is sick. lost relevance in their core market place of a particular brand, citizens of these (Xerox, Oldsmobile) to be used casually communities can be identified by four on products totally outside their product core markers: Market changes direction and the brand category (Teac, RCA, Polaroid etc.). become irrelevant. Everyone (advertising, • Shared intereStS product design, promotions) used to • Shared valueS If you happen to own a Zombie Brand, understand what the brand means and they • Shared ritualS what can you do? all stick to it, believing it connects to • Shared purpoSeS something larger and more enduring. But 1. INVEST AND ATTEMPT TO REVITALIZE IT one day they woke up and realized there The commercial, mass‐mediated ethos in 2. MILk IT was a big disconnect. Your brand is stuck in which Brand Communities are situated 3. POSITION IT FOR THE EMERGING MARkET the past. YOUR BRAND IS IRREVELANT. affects their character and structure and 4. SELL IT FOR WHATEVER IT’S WORTH 5. DUMP IT gives rise to their particularities. From a brand and marketing perspective, this is the My brand is Consumers with special relationships to most disruptive trend. It means that Zombie Brands often have sentimental Social Media, not advertising, has become dying. reasons for continuing to make purchases the conduit for communication and that or for giving them a second chance. But customers are the collective source of truth the cost and risk of bringing a brand back for brands. Given the right new content, to life is enormous. If this is your choice, The brand is becoming boring. It doesn’t the Brand Community is a possible cure for make sure the decision to do so is based create excitement for customers or even the Zombie Brand. on sound logic. If you run a large portfolio, employees anymore. Younger consumers the questions will be: Which brands are think of it as their parents’ brand. This worth the revitalization effort? And Why? is common with brands that have been successful and achieved market leadership. In fact, it’s often the result of being too successful. Your successful past has made you lazy. YOUR BRAND LACkS CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT. My Brand Has No Vital Signs. You’ve ignore your brand for too long or simply let it ride to expiry. Every drop of energy and goodwill has been squeezed out. It has lost its power to capture your customers' (or even your own) imagination. Your brand is a shell of existence. IT HAS BEEN REDUCED TO NOTHING MORE THAN A LOGO. 46 47
  26. 26. strategIc perspectIves of brandIng 48 49
  27. 27. “We have a surplus “We also have a surplus The average consumer is exposed to as many as 30,000 messages per day, of of similar companies, of similar brands, which more than 3,000 are branded. Many studies indicate that less than 10% of prime time ads have clear positioning. employing similar having similar attributes, Between 1999 and 2000, the number of new packaged goods introduced people, with similar with similar marketing increased by more than 20%, the largest increase in a decade. Most of these educational back- messages and were “me-too” products destined to be lost in the crowd and to reduce some grounds, working slogans, coming up brands to a near-commodity status. In a world where brands abound, in similar jobs, coming with similar brand competition is increasingly intense and the speed of competitive responses is ever shorter. The race is on to rise above the up with similar ideas, claims, with similar throng of brands and secure customer loyalty. But all too often, companies fall into producing similar quality, selling at similar the trap of thinking short-term, being overly ambitious or lacking a brand strategy. things, with similar prices. Welcome to prices and similar the Surplus Economy!” quality.” – Idris Mootee – kjell Nordstrom and Jonas Ridderstrale, Funky Business + + =? ENTERPRISE BEST STRATEGIC RESOURCE PRACTICES OUTSOURCING MANAGEMENT NOT ONLY ARE BRANDS SIMILAR, EVEN THE COMPANIES ARE NOW MORE OR LESS THE SAME OR NEARLY IDENTICAL 50 51
  28. 28. brandIng and economIc evolutIon mcdonaldIZatIon In the Surplus Economy, the marketing battle is a battle of the brands – a technology is often oriented towards McDonaldization is everywhere. Individualism competition for brand dominance. greater control and more consistent quality. and diversity are replaced by efficiency Companies will recognize that brands are The great source of uncertainty and and social control. It is the process by which a company’s most valuable assets unpredictability in a rationalizing system is the principles of the fast food restaurant and recognize that it is more important people — either the people who work dominate more and more sectors of our to own markets than factories. within those systems or the people who are society throughout the world. The only way to own markets is to own served. Branding advertising is used to McDonald’s has 30,000 restaurants in market-dominant brands. The brand put the human elements back. The warm 121 countries, 60% of which are outside the battlefields expand beyond advertising and smiling faces in TV commercials USA. Shopping centers are everywhere media and be fought on many grounds. are intended to convince customers about and the shops and merchandize are mostly “calculability” over “individuality”. the same. This trend is visible in many other businesses from toys, auto-repair, “(calculability) involves an emphasis on things that can convenient stores, consumer electronics to be calculated, counted, quantified. quantification refers to books and general merchandize. The a tendency to emphasize quantity rather than quality. This leads to a sense that quality is equal to a certain, usually “control” and “system” components are key. (but not always) large quantity of things.” Replacement of human by non-human The Battle of Brands SURPLUS ECONOMY INFORMATION ECONOMY SERVICE ECONOMY INDUSTRIAL ECONOMY AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY VALUE TIME 52 53
  29. 29. customer fournIer’s customer relatIonshIps approach: relatIonshIps Most businesses have a relationship with their customers Meet with consumers (hundreds of people over several Managing Customer Relationships has that is based solely on price. That is why so many years) to listen to their life stories, discover their interests become Managing Software Vendor companies are having difficulties maintaining their margins. and goals, and hear about the ups & downs of their Relationships. So, what went wrong? The challenge is to figure out how to extend those daily lives. Then ask each person to describe his/her Shouldn’t companies be putting their money transaction-based relationships to emotional-based “brand portfolio” and to explain why they choose the back into developing the “R” of “CRM”? relationships. Professor Susan Fournier at Harvard products they do. Marketers and “CRM” vendors set Business School has classified the relationships consumers Fournier drew out seven essential attributes of good unrealistically high expectations when they have with their brands into fifteen types ranging across brand relationship quality: talk about “relationships”. Should the whole spectrum. They include: they be using a different word instead? “Traditionally, tactical marketing decisions – regarding packaging and advertising, for COMMITTED PARTNERSHIP ENSLAVEMENT INTERDEPENDENCE LOVE AND PASSION instance – are made by different people or Usually long-term and Involuntary relationship Brand is inextricably Consumers feel affection/ departments. A holistic understanding voluntary relationship: a governed exclusively by the woven into consumers’ passion for the products of the relationship that consumers have with man is so involved with partner’s wishes or desires: daily life and routine. and may experience a brand can give direction to a company’s his brand of bicycle that he a consumer is unhappy with separation anxiety if it’s marketing activities and result in a stronger becomes an advocate the local cable provider but not available. bond between consumer and brand” of it, singing its praises to has no alternative source for his friends. the service. – Susan Fournier Harvard Business School COMMITMENT SELF-CONCEPT CONNECTION “A good relationship is an asset. We can Consumers stick with Using the brand helps invest in relationships, and we can borrow the product through good consumers address a from them. We all do it but almost never or bad times either in life issue, such as a need manage it. Yet a company’s most precious his or her life style or in the to belong or a fear of asset is its relationship with customers.” product’s life cycle. growing old. – Theodore Levitt Harvard Business School INTIMACY PARTNER qUALITY Consumers describe a Consumers seek certain sense of deep familiarity positive traits in the brand with the product and such as dependability, an understanding of its trust, worthiness, and attributes. accountability – the same qualities as one would look for in a best friend. NOSTALGIC ATTACHMENT brand brings back memories either because it was used at an earlier time in life or because it was associated with loved ones 54 55
  30. 30. rIse and rIse of the brand The very technologies that make it faster, easier and cheaper to innovate also help us to imitate. The game switched from innovation to imitation. The increasing difficulty in differentiating between products, services and the speed with which competitors take up innovations will only assist in the rise and rise of the brand. Many of our dreams and desires for a better world are no longer articulated by John kennedys or Martin Luther kings, nor generated through personal epiphanies – they are now the intellectual currency of brands. When brands connect to inspiration and epiphany – personal, collective or conjured by leaders – they enter into a realm immune to imitation. 56 57

×