Introduction for students
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  • Drink your tea alone or with others? Do you notice the effect of social contact on your physical health or the physical health of others?
  • How do you get others to behave in ways that you want - in a game of sports, on the job, in your household?

Introduction for students Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Communication Survey
    • What did you learn were your strengths? Your weak areas?
    • Was there anything that surprised you or was a new way of looking at communication?
    • 3. Considering the last question, what “type” do you think you are? Does it fit you? What did you learn about dealing with people who are different types? Think about someone in your life who you would consider to have a different style than you; give an example of a problem you had in the past which relates to a style difference and then give suggestions on how to improve communication with him/her based on the information given.
  • 2. The Importance of Communication
    • The Power of Silence
    • The Power of Isolation
    • Contact and Companionship
  • 3. We Communicate to Satisfy Physical Needs
    • Link Between Communication and Physical Well-being
    • Quality and Quantity Vary By Individuals
    “ We must love one another or die.” W.H. Auden
  • 4. We Communicate to Satisfy Identity Needs
    • We Learn Who We are Through Communication
    • We Come to See Ourselves as Others See Us
    • Social Comparison and Reflected Appraisal
  • 5. We Communicate to Satisfy Social Needs
    • Pleasure
    • Affection
    • Companionship
    • Control
    “ Who can enjoy alone?” John Milton Paradise Lost
  • 6. We Communicate to Satisfy Practical Needs (Instrumental) Goals
    • Communication Skills Top Factor in Getting Jobs
    • Keeping a Job and Advancement Tied to Communication Skills
  • 7. Rank the Skills
    • Employers were asked to rank the
    • importance of the skills they seek
    • in college graduates.
    • How would you
    • rate these skills?
    • ___ Analytical Skills
    • ___ Computer Skills
    • ___ Leadership Skills
    • ___ Interpersonal Skills
    • ___ Teamwork Skills
    • ___ Writing Skills
    • ___ Oral Communication Skills
    • ___ Proficiency in a Field of Study
  • 8. Doing what one is fitted for doing Self-fulfillment Actualizing one’s potential High self-evaluation, self-respect, self-esteem, esteem of others, strength, achievement, competency, reputation, prestige, status, fame, glory Friendship, affectionate relationships, interpersonal acceptance Security, stability, protection, freedom from chaos, structure, order, law Food, Water, air Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11. Communication Principles and Misconceptions
    • PRINCIPLES:
    • Communication can be intentional or unintentional
    • It’s impossible not to communicate
    • Communication is irreversible
    • Communication is unrepeatable
    • MISCONCEPTIONS:
    • Meaning are in words
    • More Communication is a good thing
    • You alone can cause others to react
    • Communication will solve all problems
    • Communication is a natural ability
    • EXPLAIN THEM
    • GIVE AN EXAMPLE
    • WHY WOULD IT BE IMPORTANT TO KNOW?
  • 12. Communication Competence
    • Involves Achieving One’s Goals While Preserving Relationships
    • No “Ideal” Way to Communicate
    • Competence is Situational
    • Competence Can Be learned
  • 13. Characteristics of Competent Communicators
    • Wide Range of Behaviors
    • Ability to Choose Most Appropriate Behavior
    • Skill at Performing Behaviors
      • How do you learn a skill?
  • 14. Communication Competence Skill at Performing Behaviors
    • Beginning Awareness
  • 15. Communication Competence Skill at Performing Behaviors
    • Beginning Awareness
    • Awkwardness
  • 16. Communication Competence Skill at Performing Behaviors
    • Beginning Awareness
    • Awkwardness
    • Skillfulness
  • 17. Communication Competence Skill at Performing Behaviors
    • Beginning Awareness
    • Awkwardness
    • Skillfulness
    • Integration
  • 18. Characteristics of Competent Communicators
    • Wide Range of Behaviors
    • Ability to Choose Most Appropriate Behavior
    • Skill at Performing Behaviors
    • Cognitive complexity/empathy
    • Self-monitoring
    • Commitment