Enterprise Search in SharePoint 2013

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Enterprise Search in SharePoint 2013. Presented by Paula Petcu and Ludvig Aldrin at Microsoft Campus Day, 31 October 2012, in Copenhagen Denmark,

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  • Hello. My name is Paula and in the next hour we will be talking about search.The previous presenter talked about the social computing and collaboration features in SharePoint 2013. This presentation is about enterprise search. Social plays an important role in search, and we can also say that search plays an important role in social as well. And we will see a bit later how these two core features interact with each-other.ORThis presentation is about enterprise search. In SharePoint 2013 search is installed by default and is used in different features throughout the platform, so it plays a very important in the new SharePoint.I have slides and also two demos, and you are welcome to ask your questions in the 15 minutes after the 1 hour presentation.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Learn how easy it is to build powerful search experiences using SharePoint 2013. The session will showcase the Search in SharePoint 2013 and provide a technical and functional walkthrough of what is new. We will take you through the out-of-box search experience, and you will get tips and tricks on how to extend the search platform to create a great custom experience for your users. We will also discuss the new search architecture and how search plays a central role in the new SharePoint.Previous presentation in agenda: Enterprise Social with SP 2013 and YammerFollowing presentation in agenda: SP 2013 as an Internet Business PlatformTotal presentation time: 1h 15min (75 min)
  • Our agenda for this presentation includes three parts. The first part will include an overview of search and will walk you through the out-of-the-box search experience, showcasing the new or improved functionalities and discussing how this affects the search experience. This part is all about finding what the users are looking for and getting answers to their questions. The new product revolves around the user more than ever, and you will be able to see this in the new search experience.Then we will discuss about the new search architecture, and this will make the transition to the second part of the presentation, which is all about extending. We will talk a bit about executing queries under the new architecture and more specifically on how we can extend the way they are executed.Prior to SharePoint 2013, the only way to inspect and manipulate managed property values for items before being added to the search index was by extending the item processing pipeline in FAST Search for SharePoint. Clients using SharePoint search were out of luck as the functionality was not available to them. Now, MS has introduced three new items for content processing and enrichment: parsers, custom entity extractors, and web service callouts. We will discuss these new features and demo one of them.But what happens next to the search engine? The third part of the presentation will talk about the governance of your search solution. More specifically, we will focus on search analytics.I am an IT consultant at Findwise and I am working with enterprise search and actually specializing on SharePoint search. [Introduce Ludvig as CIO and experienced consultant in MS search]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Note: Try to connect the start of this presentation with the previous and following presentations (social, internet business platform)Note:Show admin interface in one of the demosIntro and agenda (1 min)Part 1: Find. Answer.Search Overview (5 min)The role of searchFindwise in brief (2-3 min max)2. SharePoint 2013 Search User Experience (15 min)- the out-of-box search experience, providing a technical and functional walkthrough of what is new (showcase the functionalities with screenshots and discuss how this affects the search experience)[Should we have a live environment here and let the audience interact?][Should we as a summary have a table listing the features – like we have in the docs on sugarsync – should we have a summary here or maybe better at the end of presentation where we have already discussed on how we can extend these]3. SharePoint 2013 Search Architecture (5-10 min)Discuss the components and how it has improved when compared with SharePoint 2010Part 2: Extend. (tips and tricks on how to extend the search platform to create a great custom experience for your users)1. Extend (2 min)Enterprise and external content (federating, additional connectors)Extensible content processingFlexible query management / flexible results frameworkIntegrate with business applicationsThis Extend section should also mention the limitations of the technology and how we can helpTune relevance? In the UI and via XRANK2. Query Management (5 min)- Executing queries in SharePoint 2013: query language, REST API3. Demo: Creating a Search App (15 min)What is an app (the new app model)Create a simple search app executing queries (show interface and code behind)Show a more complex search app (show interface only)[Live environment, and for backup use images and videos][For the more complex search app – we build a search-driven application. Should have a business case, explain the business case, and then discuss how do we meet the business goals through the application? This would take another 5 minutes of presentation]4. Parsers, Custom Entity Extraction, Web Service Callouts | Content Processing and Enrichment (10 min)- 3 new items: parsers, custom entity extraction, web service callouts5. Demo: (15 min)What in FS4SP meant extending the processing pipeline by creating a new item processing stage[Live environment, and for backup use images and videos]Summary (5 minutes)Next (1 minute)
  • -Talk about Findwise-Started in Gothenburg Sweden in 2005-First customer SKF with FAST ESP-Grown to 90 employees-Offices in 5 countries: Gothenburg, Stockholm, Oslo, Warsaw Poland, Sydney Australia and of course Copenhagen-Started delivering tweaks and configurations to FAST ESP-Gone to delivering Findability solutions to create customer business values
  • Want to SharePoint 2013 cool stufSeen 2005 Not just a search boxHolistic perspectiveConsideration business, users, search, information, organizationNot just partFindability to your SharePointMe personalyFindabilitySoltuions in SharePointWorking more with our internal bussines processesPresenting the company Findwise Representing the of our microsoftiniativesThe future -> Paula
  • Search in SharePoint 2013 focuses not just on technology, but the belief that search should help users find what they are looking for and get answers to the questions they ask. This means going beyond searching a index, which required the development of a entire new experience dedicated to the users intent, that can analyze user interactions.In the next few slides, we will show how SharePoint 2013 search has made it easier to find information and get answers to questions.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • This is how the new search interface looks!Let’s start from the search box. Query suggestion (or autocomplete) guide the user search keywords as the user types. It provides suggestions based on previously searched queries.Now, the autocomplete experience not only shows you common queries, but actually allows you to navigate back to past results you’ve interacted with.Result blocks contain a small subset of results that are related in a particular way (for example, PowerPoint documents appear in a result block when the word ‘presentation’ is one of the query terms)The refinement panel summarizes and narrows the results. For example, it allows the user to type in a broad query and then drill down in the result set.In SharePoint 2013, the refinement panel reflects more accurately the entities in your content. Until now, deep refiners were only available for FAST Search for SharePoint customers. Deep refinement allows users to see the exact number of documents that match each refinement option in a result set. However, you will notice that the counts are not enabled for the refiners, and we will discuss how to enable them in one of our demos.Visual refiners are available out-of-the-box.Video and audio have been introduced as new content types.Document deep links provides the ability to look at the structure of the document and it works for PowerPoint and Word documents. Text in bigger fonts or underlined text gets extracted and stored, and in the search result you can quickly jump straight to it.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • The hover panel allows you for example to get a live preview of a document, dive into the document structure, and take actions on a document. A similar functionality in 2010, that allowed users to quickly review documents in the results page, are the visual previews, however these were only available to FAST Search for SharePoint customers.What is more interesting is that the hover card experience changes based on content type. Result types rules determine what type of result you’re looking at and the correct hover panel will be shown based on those rules.It is extensible and customizable to allow you to make search actionable for any content and create a richer experience.The previews are powered by Office Web Apps, and you need to have a separate server in your farm for hosting these web apps. If you don’t, you will not be able to see the document previews in the hover panel.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • People searchFor people/expertise search, in the hover panel we see past projects, interests, or documents that a persons has worked on (documents relevant to the query). The actions you can take are also contextual. For a person result, you can follow, send email, view profile, while for a video it can play and share.Social recommendations (introduced in this version) are powered by search, and are based on analysis of user’s behavior patterns.Also, people search is now integrated with the core results.You now have more than phonetic search for people names. You have name suggestions as you type which support exact name matching and fuzzy matches (where the spelling is similar but not exact because of phonetic misspellings or typing errors).----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • The first step is finding the right information. The next step is answering to actual questions.Answering questions is about understanding the user intentIf you search for “x x video”, the search surfaces videos on top. If you search for “x x expert”, the search surfaces people. This is done through the out-of-the-box query rules, and businesses can create their own query rules that can trigger new experiences.Search can go beyond searching for documents. Here is an example of utilizing information in conversations in SharePoint for answering a question.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • So, what is powering this great search experience? Let’s take a look at the search architecture.Until now, customers could choose between SharePoint search and FAST Search for SharePoint. In this release, there is only one product to worry about, the two search options being now unified into a single enterprise search platform. MS wanted to develop the next generation search engine by bringing together the best of the two worlds. The result is a system that combines the crawler and connector framework familiar from SharePoint Search with the next-generation content processing and query processing frameworks from FAST, all working in conjunction with a search core based on FAST Search. (http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blog/Pages/BlogPost.aspx?pID=1030)Let’s discuss about each component in the architecture. If we start from the left, we talk about content sources, and these can be http, file shares, SharePoint itself, profiles, exchange, and so on.Connecting to these sources in this version of SharePoint is done through .NET assembly connectors (previously used for business connectivity services solutions). Previously, iFilters were used to crawl a piece of content we find in a repository. Now, this is replaced by parsers, which is a new piece introduced in this architecture.Moving to the right, we find the content processing component. There is one entry point in this content processing pipeline, and that is called the web service call-out. Here is where you can receive information about managed properties, you can modify information about the properties, and send it back into the content pipeline before they actually get in the index. The indexing component is just the box that represents the actual indexing of content, building the index that we search.A new analysis engine was integrated. It serves for a variety of jobs including processing user behavior, performing click analysis, recommendations. The search system determines the relevance of search results in part by how content is connected, how often an item appears in search results, and which search results people click. The new analytics component in SharePoint Server 2013 tracks and analyzes this information and uses it to continuously improve relevance. (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee667266(v=office.15).aspx)At this step, we have built an index on which we can query against. This querying happens on the right side here. Query pipeline – contains the functionality necessary to execute the query and move it from user interface in the query engine where it actually gets executed against the index, and then getting the results and moving them back to the user interface. At the query pipeline level, search provides a RESTful interface that can be used to run queries.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Note: can change image if we can find a better oneNote: Description of components in the architecture are based on the developer training (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/sharepoint/fp123633)Additional info:Continuous Crawling: this is new interesting feature, where the farm administrator can enable continuous crawling for content so once you add a new document it can appear in the search results in matter of minutes even it will not wait for indexing to finish to appear in the search results- Moved to a crawling paradigm as opposed to a content push paradigm. The Content API from FAST is no longer available. To make sure the content is up-to-date, the crawler now runs continuously. Continuous crawl only works on the SharePoint index, and uses the crawl log to pick up the changes in order to build up the index. Example change is an access permission being changed. Cont. crawls are parallel. Cont. crawls don’t retry the errors. Can have for example continuous crawl running all the time, incremental crawl running periodically, and full crawl once a week => keep the index updated and healthy. (developer training, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/sharepoint/fp123633)High Scalability: implicitly SharePoint 2013 search inherits the high scalability model of FAST Search Server (http://www.brightstarr.com/Pages/sharepoint-2013-for-search.aspx)Schema management: schema is the columns you want to expose managed properties in the search. schema can be managed by the site administrators (http://www.brightstarr.com/Pages/sharepoint-2013-for-search.aspx)Like in previous versions of SharePoint, the crawled properties get created by the crawler in the index, but what we work with when we build our solutions are the managed properties. -> create managed properties that map to crawled properties and the managed properties allow us to create keyword query language searches against the index. (http://www.brightstarr.com/Pages/sharepoint-2013-for-search.aspx)New: a CSOM API that allows us to export and import search settings. Example usage is to take settings from DEV to QA to Production. Previous, through PowerShell. Does not handle master pages, templates and web parts. Handles rules, sources, managed properties (developer training, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/sharepoint/fp123633)
  • While the out-of-the-box SharePoint 2013 search experience sounds exciting, you may also be wondering how much customization and extensibility opportunities you have.SharePoint 2013 can search content in repositories other than SharePoint sites by crawling or federating. For example, the search system can crawl content in repositories such as file shares, web, Exchange public folders, Documentum, and Lotus Notes using connectors included with SharePoint 2013. Additional connectors for crawling databases and third-party application data are created by using the Business Connectivity Services connector framework. With SharePoint 2013 developers can extend content processing and enrichment. “This can be achieved by leveraging the flexibility of using OOB or custom entity extractors, custom IFilter parsers, or even extending the content processing flow with a custom web service call-out . The web service call-out not only supports trigger conditions which allow for more control, but is also much easier to work with, manage and troubleshoot.” We will discuss this in more details in the next slides.Query rules can help combining business rules with user intent without any custom code. We will talk more about this in the next slides.The search experience can be customized and allows organizations to extend and build their own experiences through the RESTful API’s. We can surface data in SharePoint, a custom interface or even on any device.We will talk further about the query management, the content processing, and the RESTful API.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1. Extend (2 min) - tips and tricks on how to extend the search platform to create a great custom experience for your usersEnterprise and external content (federating, additional connectors)Extensible content processingFlexible query management / flexible results frameworkIntegrate with business applicationsThis Extend section should also mention the limitations of the technology and how we can helpTune relevance? In the UI and via XRANK
  • Let’s take a look now at the query management in SharePoint 2013. And we have identified here certain aspects that we will shortly discuss in what follows.Customizations to Query Spelling Correction / Did you mean feature are now managed in the term store, at farm level. Both inclusions and exclusions can be specified.You can use a thesaurus file to specify synonyms for a single word or multiple words that occur in queries. The query is expanded based on the entries in the thesaurus. Adding such a thesaurus file is still managed through PowerShell. There is one file that includes all synonyms for all languages but you specify a language code for each synonyms to define when the synonym should be applied.Some of the characteristics of the FAST Query Language have made their way into the Query Language used in Search, so we will shortly review the query languages available in SharePoint 2013.Also, we will shortly discuss about a new feature in SharePoint 2013: Query rules that can be used to customize the search results.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Query spelling correction – hosted in the termstore. Also, there is still a dynamic dictionary that is created based on content in the index, or you can switch to the static OOB dictionary. [so how was it in 2010?]Changes in relevance:New ranking models for people search, intranet sites, and internet sitesAnalysis of content and user interaction. The new analytics component in SharePoint Server 2013 tracks and analyzes this information and uses it to continuously improve relevance.Query rulesResult sourcesCreate and deploy a thesaurus in SharePoint Server 2013: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219579(v=office.15).aspx
  • New to SharePoint 2013, Query Rules can be used to customize search results in a flexible manner (adapt the experience based on the user’s true intent). A Query Rule consists of three top level elements:Query Conditions: Which queries will activate the rule? A condition might be that a word in a user's query matches a term in a SharePoint term set, or that a word in a query commonly appears in queries typed on a particular site on your intranetQuery Action: What will happen when the rule fires?Publishing Options: When will the rule be used?A query rule can specify the following types of actions:Add Promoted Results (formerly called Best Bets) that appear above ranked results. For example, for the query "sick leave," a query rule could specify a particular Promoted Result, such as a link to a site that has a statement of company policy regarding time off work.Add one or more result blocks. For example, for a query that contains "Fabrikam sales report," a query rule might use a taxonomy dictionary to recognize Fabrikam as a customer, and then display a result block with pertinent results about Fabrikam from a customer relationship management (CRM) system.Change ranked results, such as by modifying their relevance. For example, for a query that contains "download toolbox," a query rule could recognize the word "download" as an action term and boost results from a particular download site on your intranet.[Why not in FAST – The FAST developers, now out of the box, integrated in sharepoint][Talk about the screenshot example]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • If you want to gain full control over the search experience and build powerful search-based solution, you are probably interested in the query languages available in SharePoint 2013.In the past, we have had three different query languages that we could use for search. In this version, these are unified so we have fewer things to worry about.In this version, keyword query syntax (KQL) is the preferred method for executing queries against the index.Allows you to take a managed property and say that property equals a value (title=sharepoint) or that it contains a value (title:sharepoint)This syntax has been enhancedFAST Query language is still available, but you should be able to do the things you used to do with FQL with KQLSQL query syntax is removed from the productAs the syntax for the Keyword query language has been enhanced, you will probably not feel the need to use the other two.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Note: this is based on the developer training (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/sharepoint/fp123633)
  • This slide shows the REST-based API into search. While you can go into the search center and just type in a query in KQL, as developers we can use the same keyword query syntax in the REST-based API to get results. In the examples, you see that there is a URL that we can call, and _api is pointing to the restful API endpoint. And then we provide query string arguments that refer to the keyword query syntax.The RESTful API is exposing all the properties that are part of the keyword query object inside of SharePoint as query strings. So, for example, you can see in the second example we have a query text (in our case we are just looking for test) and then we are including the selectproperties parameter to allow us to return just the title and the rank from search.We also have some examples of sorting, and the point is that all the properties available in KQL are available through the REST API.--And this is how the results would look like. You will probably use some code to pick up the interesting elements from the result, but the point is that you get back a document in a predictable format that has a row for each of the results, and you decide how to display this.You can use this RESTful API to develop apps for SharePoint, apps on tables or mobile devices, and more.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[Maybe even show live or at least a screenshot if we get a live real-word simulating environment]Talk about opportunities for developing on tablets etc.
  • We have seen what extensibility options we have on the query management side. Let’s now look at the extensibility options of the content we are working with in the first place. The content processing pipeline is the one place where you have access to all of the crawled items before the index gets created.One of the strengths of FAST was the advanced content processing capabilities and the idea of extracting and creating metadata from documents to improve search results, sorting capabilities, and refinement.There are three new items in SharePoint 2013 related to content processing and enrichment: parsers, custom entity extraction, and the web service call-out. We will now talk about each of them.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Maggies notes: In FS4SP: Advanced Content ProcessingExtract and create metadata from documents to improve search results, sorting capabilities, and refinementDocument processing – create own item processing pipeline stages (changes crawled properties)Property Extraction Built-in property extraction stages: Companies, Locations, Person NamesSupported languages in the built-in property extraction stages: Arabic, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, SpanishCreate own Custom Property ExtractorIn SP13: (need to be double checked)Advanced Content ProcessingExtract and create metadata from documents to improve search results, sorting capabilities, and refinementDocument processing – create own item processing pipeline stages (SP13 provides a new web service interface) (changes managed properties?)Property Extraction Create own Custom Property ExtractorRemoved built-in property extraction stages in SP13
  • In previous versions of SharePoint we have used something called an IFilter to allow us to crawl the individual items in a content source. Parsers are more sophisticated than iFilters.The parser detects the document format, and based on this, it calls an appropriate format handler to actually do the parsing. File format detection is now done regardless the document extension. OOTB, parsers can actually detect more formats than are supported by the format handlers and for this reason iFilters are not going away completely. The iFilter API is still supported.Besides automatic file format detection regardless the document extension, new parsing features include:Deep link extraction means that anything in the document that is formated as a header or a slide title is pulled out and displayed as a link in the hover panel, so users can more easily find the sections that are of interest.The visual metadata extraction extracts the title, author and date based on the document and not the metadata because the metadata can sometimes be wrong. Good search results depend on users entering good metadata for documents and not all users do that.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------High performance format handlers OOTB: html, docx, pptx, txt, image, xml, pdfNo format handler for Visio or OneNote for exampleBased on MSDN developer training
  • The custom entity extraction is an extensibility point that allows you to plug your own dictionary into the search system. This capability is useful when you want to search and refine by something that doesn’t have a managed property defined. Those of you that use FS4SP know that the some predefined extractors were available for extracting person names and locations. In SharePoint 2013, you can create custom extractors to replace those. The difference is that, in SharePoint 2013, the custom extractors are only based on dictionary entries, whereas the predefined extractors used extraction rule. The number of custom extractors that you can create is now limited to 12.The dictionary is a simple text file that you import using PowerShell. There are 12 custom extractor slots that you can use, and each slot is defined using some predefined name. There are word matching and substring matching dictionaries and then there are case insensitive and case sensitive slots that you can put them in. So 12 custom dictionaries in total.We will see in a few minutes a demo on how to add a custom entity extractor.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Based on MSDN developer training5 word matching, case insensitive1 word matching, case sensitive5 substring matching, case insensitive1 substring matching, case sensitiveNote: number of custom extractors was unlimited in FS4SPRead: FAST Search Server 2010 for SharePoint deprecated features: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff607742(v=office.15).aspx#section4Read: FAST Search SharePoint Adding Structure White PaperFAST Search Server 2010 for SharePoint includes property extraction dictionaries for 11 languages (Arabic, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish) and 3 kinds of entities:Location (by default enabled in the pipeline)Company (by default enabled in the pipeline)Person (disabled, must be manually enabled)In addition to the 3 property extractors available out-of-the-box, FAST Search Server 2010 for SharePoint features a built-in extensibility mechanism based on custom dictionaries: the whole words extractor.Company name extraction is built-in in SharePoint 2013 and managed through the TermStore: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj591605(v=office.15).aspx
  • The web service callout allows you to transform managed properties using a custom web service. It allows you to modify managed properties and/or add new properties. Can be used for data cleansing. For example, if your documents include MSFT, Microsoft, Microsoft Corporation, with the web service callout you can take a look at the managed property for company and you could normalize all these values into Microsoft Corporation. It can also be used for entity extraction, which means adding new managed properties that did not exist before. Or you can use this service for classification and tagging, by adding new managed properties based on some kind of classification.The web service client is configured with a SOAP endpoint and implements a well defined interface. This will allow for the web service to be called during the crawling process. A key thing is that there is a trigger condition that determines when to do the synchronous callout. If the trigger condition evaluates to true, the web service is called, if it evaluates to false, the web service does not perform a callout, and if no trigger condition is set, all items are sent to this web service. What this also means is that you can plug in your own custom processing web service in this step.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Image source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sharepoint/jj163968(v=office.15).aspxBased on MSDN developer trainingand Content enrichment within content processing:http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sharepoint/jj163968(v=office.15).aspx
  • We will go through 3 demos: adding counts to refiners, managing query suggestions and adding our custom entity extractor.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1. Manage query suggestions from central admin and from powershell2. Create a search app that can execute some queries using the REST API3. Add a custom entity extractor4. Create a content enrichment web serviceREST API example: http://www.blendmaster.net/blog/2012/09/view-managed-property-value-in-sharepoint-2013-using-search-rest-api/http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/office/SharePoint-2013-Perform-a-1bf3e87dhttp://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/sharepoint/fp123633Web service callout example: http://www.blendmaster.net/blog/2012/09/using-content-enrichment-web-service-callout-in-sharepoint-2013-preview/
  • Before we start with the first demo, let me tell you a few words about the setup of my development environment.I have a virtual machine running Windows Server 2012 with SharePoint Server 2013 Preview installed. The same machine acts as a domain controller, which is not recommended but this is just a small development environment, and it is also the SQL server. I have some content in, and I’m currently only crawling my Local SharePoint sites. You can now get an accurate count of a refiner value from the entire corpus of data associated with your query, which means deep refiners. This was only available for FS4SP customers. The alternative are shallow refiners which create refiners off the top X number of search results instead of all search results, and this is the way it was in SharePoint 2010 Search.-- Go to demo environmentAs you can see I have some refiners here but no counts. In this demo, I will add counts to the Author refiner. What controls the look and feel in SharePoint 2013 is the Display Templates. So if we edit the refinement web part, click on choose refiners, and select the Author refiner, we see that the associated Display Template is called Refinement Item. This is what we need to change. Display Templates are stored in the Master Page Gallery, we can access this for example by going to the new Design Manager and selecting Edit Display Templates.Find the Refinement Item and click on the three dots and copy the location.If you open the location, you will find the files that correspond to the Refinement Item. You can directly edit these or create a copy that you modify. I will create a copy. So I will download the html and edit it in an editor.In the documents, you will see that there is an option called ShowCounts that – you guessed it – needs to be set to true to get the counts. Save the file with a new name.Upload the file in the same location and give it a nice name. Once you upload it, you’ll notice it autogenerates the associated .js.Now it’s just a matter of using this new template. Jump back to your Search Hub, edit the page when you see the refiner, edit the Refinement web part, select the Choose Refiners, pick your refiner (Display Author for me), and select the Display template drop down. Bam! There it is – your new display template.Save and then try a search.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Based on:Getting Refiner Counts Back in SharePoint 2013 Search: http://blogs.technet.com/b/searchguys/archive/2012/08/16/getting-refiner-counts-back-in-sharepoint-2013-search.aspx
  • Let’s make a simple search.Similar to the way query suggestions were handled in SharePoint 2010, in SharePoint 2013 a query phrase is automatically added as a query suggestion if it has received a minimum of 6 clicks per year, and this update happens daily. However, in 2013, the query suggestions are generated for each result source and for each site collection, which means that the automatically generated query suggestions can be different per result source and per site collection.You have probably experienced the situation where you manually have to add or remove query suggestions, either because of a new environment in which there is not much user activity, or for example a situation where you want to remove some sensitive information from the query suggestions. And the way you did this was through a PowerShell cmdlet, like this:New-SPEnterpriseSearchLanguageResourcePhrase -SearchApplication $searchapp -Language En-Us -Type QuerySuggestionAlwaysSuggest -Name "refinement test” [Show TechNet page for cmdlet]The same cmdlet is still available for SharePoint 2013. However, there is now an additional cmdletthat might make your life easier: Import-SPEnterpriseSearchPopularQueries. [Show TechNet page for cmdlet] It allows you to import a comma-separated values file of queries to be suggested as the user types. Furthermore, amongst other things, it allows you to specify a specific site collection for which the queries should be added, something that was not available before.So let’s try this out. [Demo powershellcmdlets]Also interesting to point out is that the preview version of SharePoint 2013 indicates that query suggestions files can be also imported through the Central Administration interface, though current documentation seems to point that the query suggestions are added on the Search service application level and they will apply to all result sources and all site collections. [Show where]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Query suggestions from Central Administration: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj721441(v=office.15).aspxQuery suggestions from PowerShell: http://www.dotnetmafia.com/blogs/dotnettipoftheday/archive/2012/09/18/how-to-seed-search-suggestions-in-sharepoint-2013-preview.aspxQuery suggestions in SP 2010: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh148698.aspxImport-SPEnterpriseSearchPopularQueries: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219665(v=office.15).aspx
  • This demo is about creating a custom entity extractor, and what we will do is create an extractor for identifying cities in text.First thing to do is creating a dictionary. A dictionary is basically a list of keywords and phrases to be matched in the text as it is processed in the pipeline. The dictionary may define variations (e.g. alternative spellings, synonyms, aliases or acronyms) to be normalized or mapped to a single entry (e.g. for display purposes). Several such dictionaries may co-exist to address different needs of the business, for example:Business and industry-specific conceptsCustomer names and referencesCompetitor names, stock tickers and productsEmployee names and aliasesProject names and codesProduct names, acronyms and part numbersIn fact, the data required to build and maintain high-quality property extraction dictionaries may be readily available within the organization (e.g. line-of-business applications, databases, XML files) or from external sources. --- So let’s see the demo now.Let’s make a simple search. I don’t have a separate server for the Office Web Apps, so I don’t see the previews in the hover panel, but I still get some info about my documents.So, in order to extract the locations from the documents, I will create a custom entity extractor and for that I need a custom dictionary that defines the phrases that need to be matched with the processed text. I have already prepared one containing a few cities.Next, I need to deploy this dictionary and I will do this using PowerShell, so I will use the following cmdlets to import the dictionary file. […]$searchApp = Get-SPEnterpriseSearchServiceApplicationImport-SPEnterpriseSearchCustomExtractionDictionary –SearchApplication $searchApp –Filename C:\\cities.csv –DictionaryName Microsoft.UserDictionaries.EntityExtraction.Custom.Word.1Then, we will need to associate the custom entity extraction dictionary with an existing managed property from which you want to extract custom entities. Typically, these are managed properties such as Title or Body. So we will filter for the body property, click on edit, and then under Custom entity extraction we select the custom entity extraction dictionary that we have imported and click OK.After the next full crawl has completed, the custom entity extractor is enabled, and the extracted entities are copied to one of the managed properties associated to the 12 custom extractor slots. These managed properties are automatically configured to be searchable, queryable, retrievable, sortable, and refinable.This means that we can now use the managed property as a refiner and we can do this in the Refinement Web Part.In the search results page, go to Site Actions and then Edit Page. Then edit the Refinement Web Part and click on Choose refiners. Select the managed property and click Add. In our case, this is WordCustomRefiner1. Click OK and the refiner is ready to use.Also interesting to point out is that all of this should be doable through PowerShell.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Create and deploy custom entity extractors in SharePoint 2013: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219480(v=office.15).aspxRead: FAST Search SharePoint Adding Structure White PaperA dictionary is basically a list of keywords and phrases to be matched in the text as it is processed in the pipeline. The dictionary may define variations (e.g. alternative spellings, synonyms, aliases or acronyms) to be normalized or mapped to a single entry (e.g. for display purposes). Several such dictionaries may co-exist to address different needs of the business, for example:Business and industry-specific conceptsCustomer names and referencesCompetitor names, stock tickers and productsEmployee names and aliasesProject names and codesProduct names, acronyms and part numbersIn fact, the data required to build and maintain high-quality property extraction dictionaries may be readily available within the organization (e.g. line-of-business applications, databases, XML files) or from external sources. To use custom entities as refiners, you first create a custom entity extraction dictionary and deploy it. Then, you configure a managed property to use a custom entity extractor and run a full crawl. After that, you can configure the Refinement Web Part on the search results page to use the custom entity as a refiner.
  • Our agenda for this presentation includes three parts. The first part will include an overview of search and will walk you through the out-of-the-box search experience, showcasing the new or improved functionalities and discussing how this affects the search experience. This part is all about finding what the users are looking for and getting answers to their questions. The new product revolves around the user more than ever, and you will be able to see this in the new search experience.Then we will discuss about the new search architecture, and this will make the transition to the second part of the presentation, which is all about extending. We will talk a bit about executing queries under the new architecture and more specifically on how we can extend the way they are executed.Prior to SharePoint 2013, the only way to inspect and manipulate managed property values for items before being added to the search index was by extending the item processing pipeline in FAST Search for SharePoint. Clients using SharePoint search were out of luck as the functionality was not available to them. Now, MS has introduced three new items for content processing and enrichment: parsers, custom entity extractors, and web service callouts. We will discuss these new features and demo one of them.But what happens next to the search engine? The third part of the presentation will talk about the governance of your search solution. More specifically, we will focus on search analytics.I am an IT consultant at Findwise and I am working with enterprise search and actually specializing on SharePoint search. [Introduce Ludvig as CIO and experienced consultant in MS search]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Note: Try to connect the start of this presentation with the previous and following presentations (social, internet business platform)Note:Show admin interface in one of the demosIntro and agenda (1 min)Part 1: Find. Answer.Search Overview (5 min)The role of searchFindwise in brief (2-3 min max)2. SharePoint 2013 Search User Experience (15 min)- the out-of-box search experience, providing a technical and functional walkthrough of what is new (showcase the functionalities with screenshots and discuss how this affects the search experience)[Should we have a live environment here and let the audience interact?][Should we as a summary have a table listing the features – like we have in the docs on sugarsync – should we have a summary here or maybe better at the end of presentation where we have already discussed on how we can extend these]3. SharePoint 2013 Search Architecture (5-10 min)Discuss the components and how it has improved when compared with SharePoint 2010Part 2: Extend. (tips and tricks on how to extend the search platform to create a great custom experience for your users)1. Extend (2 min)Enterprise and external content (federating, additional connectors)Extensible content processingFlexible query management / flexible results frameworkIntegrate with business applicationsThis Extend section should also mention the limitations of the technology and how we can helpTune relevance? In the UI and via XRANK2. Query Management (5 min)- Executing queries in SharePoint 2013: query language, REST API3. Demo: Creating a Search App (15 min)What is an app (the new app model)Create a simple search app executing queries (show interface and code behind)Show a more complex search app (show interface only)[Live environment, and for backup use images and videos][For the more complex search app – we build a search-driven application. Should have a business case, explain the business case, and then discuss how do we meet the business goals through the application? This would take another 5 minutes of presentation]4. Parsers, Custom Entity Extraction, Web Service Callouts | Content Processing and Enrichment (10 min)- 3 new items: parsers, custom entity extraction, web service callouts5. Demo: (15 min)What in FS4SP meant extending the processing pipeline by creating a new item processing stage[Live environment, and for backup use images and videos]Summary (5 minutes)Next (1 minute)
  • Now, let’s talk a bit about search analytics.We have previously mentioned that SharePoint 2013 includes a new component that runs various analytics jobs to analyze not only the content in the search index but also user actions that are performed on a site – why? for example to identify items that users perceive as more relevant that others.The new functionality for displaying content recommendations based on usage patterns actually uses the information from the analyses. By including recommendations on a page, you can guide users to other content that may be relevant for them. For example, you can guide users to popular items in a category or let them know that users who viewed this item also viewed another item. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Analytics and recommendations:The new Analytics Processing Component in SharePoint Server 2013 runs different analytics jobs to analyze content in the search index and user actions that were performed on a site to identify items that users perceive as more relevant than others.The new functionality for displaying content recommendations based on usage patterns uses the information from the analyses. By including recommendations on a page, you can guide users to other content that may be relevant for them. For example, you can guide users to popular items in a category or let them know that users who viewed this item also viewed another item.
  • Get insights about search through Excelreports providing usage events, user statistics, and traffic patterns on a site.Based on the information in the reports, you can make decisions about how to fine-tune the website.Then, monitor the changes you make. The reports are updated based on the changes that are made.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------It would be great to have a report picture here. With some real data.  Usage Reports Usage This report shows historical usage information about the site collection, such as the number of views and unique users. Use this report to identify usage trends and to determine times of high and low activity. Number of Queries This report shows the number of search queries performed. Use this report to identify search query volume trends and to determine times of high and low search activity.   Search Reports Top Queries by Day This report shows the most popular search queries. Use this report to understand what types of information visitors are seeking. Top Queries by Month This report shows the most popular search queries. Use this report to understand what types of information visitors are seeking. Abandoned Queries by Day This report shows popular search queries that received low click-through. Use this report to identify search queries that might create user dissatisfaction and to improve the discoverability of content. Then, consider using query rules to improve the query's results. Abandoned Queries by Month This report shows popular search queries that received low click-through. Use this report to identify search queries that might create user dissatisfaction and to improve the discoverability of content. Then, consider using query rules to improve the query's results. No Result Queries by Day This report shows popular search queries that returned no results. Use this report to identify search queries that might create user dissatisfaction and to improve the discoverability of content. Then, consider using query rules to improve the query's results. No Result Queries by Month This report shows popular search queries that returned no results. Use this report to identify search queries that might create user dissatisfaction and to improve the discoverability of content. Then, consider using query rules to improve the query's results. Query Rule Usage by Day This report shows how often query rules fire, how many dictionary terms they use, and how often users click their promoted results. Use this report to see how useful your query rules and promoted results are to users. Query Rule Usage by Month This report shows how often query rules fire, how many dictionary terms they use, and how often users click their promoted results. Use this report to see how useful your query rules and promoted results are to users. See also (on vmsp13): http://vmsp13/sites/SearchTest/_layouts/15/Reporting.aspx?Category=AnalyticsSiteCollection
  • Next, how does the search recommendations framework work?User actions produce usage events. When users interact with a SharePoint Server 2013 website — for example, when users click a link, press a button, or view a document — their actions are stored as usage events.The recommendations algorithm in the Analytics Processing Component counts and analyzes the usage events.After processing in the Analytics Processing Component, the information is added to the search index and the reporting database.You can thenadd recommended items and popular items web parts to a site. In SharePoint Server 2013, you can display recommendations on a site by adding one or more Recommended Items Web Parts. You can configure the Web Part to display recommendations for the document or item that a user is viewing. For example, these recommendations can be displayed under the heading Users who viewed this document also viewed.You can use the Popular Items Web Part to display the most popular items that satisfy a set of criteria. For example, these recommendations can be displayed under the heading Most popular items in this category.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------User actionsproduceusageeventsUsageeventsarecounted and analyzedInformation isadded to the indexAddrecommendeditems and popular items Web Parts to a siteGet insightsthroughreportsAct on insightsMonitor changesThe search recommendations framework works in the following way:User actions produce usage events. When users interact with a SharePoint Server 2013 website — for example, when they click a link, press a button, or view a document — their actions are stored as usage events.Usage events are counted and analyzed. The recommendations algorithm in the Analytics Processing Component counts and analyzes the usage events.Information is added to the index.After processing in the Analytics Processing Component, the information is added to the search index and the Reporting database.You can use search recommendations to do the following:Add Recommended Items and Popular Items Web Parts to a site. In SharePoint Server 2013, you can display recommendations on a site by adding one or more Recommended Items Web Parts. You can configure the Web Part to display recommendations for the document or item that a user is viewing. For example, these recommendations can be displayed under the heading Users who viewed this document also viewed.You can use the Popular Items Web Part to display the most popular items that satisfy a set of criteria. For example, these recommendations can be displayed under the heading Most popular items in this category.Get insights through reports. Information about usage events is displayed in Excel reports. You can use the reports to view user statistics to understand the traffic pattern on a website.Act on insights. Based on the information in the reports, you can make decisions about how to fine-tune the website.Monitor changes. The reports are updated based on the changes that are made, and you can monitor the effect of the changes.
  • We’ve now reached the end of the presentation. Let’s summarize what we have learned during the past hour. We’ve showcased the OOTB search experience and we’ve seen that the new features do not focus only on finding information, but also on answering users questions. We’ve seen some of the possibilities of how to extend the search to meet your business needs and customize the search experience for your users. Moreover, we’ve briefly presented the search analytics features that can help you understand what your users are looking for and analyze where more powerful features are needed.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Summary of the search platform (business features summary)Summary of search capabilities (list of search features and how we deal with them from a tech perspective in SP 2013 – do they exist, how we can customize them, how can we extend them) Maybe discuss from the 5 Findability dimensions perspectiveMight need to spread this to more than one slideUsed pervasively throughout the platform: search is used in different features, content roll up, analytics, content query…etc
  • I would like to thank the SharePoint 2013 team at Findwise. They did a great job in checking out all the search functionalities that have been added or improved in SharePoint 2013. We are excited about the new SharePoint and we are still playing with the preview version. Moreover, based on what the team has seen so far, we have created a top 5 of what we like best in SharePoint 2013.- With the new people in videos column, you are now able to search for people in videos.- Via the Print to PDF option in the hover panel, Word documents are converted automatically to PDF files.- Name suggestions introduces a simple and intuitive way to find people by their names. Start typing a name and you get name suggestions. This feature support both exact matching and phonetic (fuzzy) matches, which is useful if the user misspells a person’s name or does not remember the exact spelling of a name.- The new Analytics Processing Component feeds content recommendations [more]- Deep refiners are now out-of-the-box and visual refiners are available and can be used for example for date ranges, or continents.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[Shall we show screenshots of each?]
  • Of course, we can’tcover all the search functionalities in a one hour presentation and if you would like to learn more about what changes the new SharePoint release brings, you can start by checking the TechNet material, the developer trainings on MSDN, follow the SharePoint Team Blog and the Findwise Findability Blog.Then, download the SharePoint 2013 Preview. The SharePoint Server 2013 Preview has been available for download since July this year, and in mid-October the new SharePoint has reached Release to Manufacturing (RTM).Also, attend the SharePoint Conference in Las Vegasin November. Findwise will be there; this will be a great opportunity to learn more about the upcoming SharePoint. We will also report from the conference from a findability and enterprise search perspective using social media.Then, get in contact. Either with us or Microsoft. There are certain features in the previous versions of SharePoint or in FAST that are not enabled or configured out-of-the-box. We can help you with that and more, based on your specific needs.
  • List of questions:What are apps and how do they compare to web parts? How does the app market work? Do we have to pay for apps? Where do the apps come from/who builds the app and how do we get them? What is in the app market right now (how many apps and for what)?How easy is it to upgrade from a previous version of SharePoint? From SharePoint 2007 or SharePoint 2010?How does it compare to other search technologies on the market?We currently have a FS4SP-based search solution. Why would we switch to SharePoint 2013? How do the new social features impact search?What is the plan with Yammer?About query suggestions in SharePoint 2013 - are queries added automatically to the list of query suggestions based on a certain number of result clicks or something similar, and are these suggestions personalised to each user?If the customer wants to make SP 2010 content searchable, which connector should be used?How is SharePoint dealing with scaling? How does it affect architecture and how easy it is to scale out?What about lemmatization of Polish language?Is there a similar way as in sp2010 (it was undocumented, but if someone knew FAST it was possible) to access FAST and manipulate collections, pipelines etc. ? What about FQL? Can we still use it on FAST directly?
  • ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Add after this slide additional info that can be used based on time and audience
  • The Query Builder is a new feature in SharePoint 2013 that allows you to configure or refine a search query. It can be found in several places [say where?]The user interface has three tabs:Basics, where the query is built. The Keyword Query Language can be used here to add property and keyword filters.Sorting, where the sorting of the search results can be managed. Several levels of sorting can be used to sort the results, in addition to choosing a Ranking Model. Dynamic ordering can promote or demote items in the results on top of the ranking model.Test, where the query that was built can be evaluated. This tab shows an overview of the query, listing applied variables such as managed property groups, query rules and refiners. The query template variables can be modified on a whim to allow for easy fine-tuning of the query.----Query builder:Easily configure or refine search queriesFlexible and powerful sortingFine-tune queries by testing
  • 1. Manage query suggestions from central admin and from powershell2. Create a search app that can execute some queries using the REST API3. Add a custom entity extractor4. Create a content enrichment web service----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------REST API example: http://www.blendmaster.net/blog/2012/09/view-managed-property-value-in-sharepoint-2013-using-search-rest-api/http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/office/SharePoint-2013-Perform-a-1bf3e87dhttp://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/sharepoint/fp123633Web service callout example: http://www.blendmaster.net/blog/2012/09/using-content-enrichment-web-service-callout-in-sharepoint-2013-preview/
  • If you are familiar with SharePoint 2010, the way query suggestions were handled was that a query was automatically added as a suggestion if it has received a minimum of 6 results clicks per year. But often you wanted to add or remove query suggestions manually and this was only possible through PowerShell cmdlets. You might want to add a list of query suggestions if you have a fresh install of the search and thus no user activity, or you want to remove some sensitive information from the query suggestions. Now, in SharePoint 2013, it is possible to manage query suggestions through the Central Administration, and we will show you how to do this step by step.Open demo machine, go to Central Administration -> Manage Service Applications -> Search Service Application -> and then select Query suggestions from the left panelAs in 2010, you are able to specify what language to the query suggestions apply to.And then you can upload a text file containing the query phrases that should be included in the suggestions.Upload and save settings, and then try it out.In SharePoint 2013 queries are automatically added similar to how it worked in 2010. A minimum of 6 result clicks is required for a query phrase to be added to the list of query suggestions, and this update happens daily. However, in 2013, the query suggestions are generated for each result source and for each site collection, which means that the automatically generated query suggestions can be different per result source and per site collection.The thing is that when you manually add query suggestions using the steps in the shown procedure, the query suggestions are added on the Search service application level and they will apply to all result sources and all site collections.Now, in order to add query suggestions associated to a specific site collection, you will need to use PowerShell.[steps from blog post: http://www.dotnetmafia.com/blogs/dotnettipoftheday/archive/2012/09/18/how-to-seed-search-suggestions-in-sharepoint-2013-preview.aspx uses command: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219665(v=office.15).aspx but previously used command is still supported: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff608062.aspx and http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff608062(v=office.15).aspx ]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Query suggestions from Central Administration: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj721441(v=office.15).aspxQuery suggestions from PowerShell: http://www.dotnetmafia.com/blogs/dotnettipoftheday/archive/2012/09/18/how-to-seed-search-suggestions-in-sharepoint-2013-preview.aspxQuery suggestions in SP 2010: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh148698.aspx
  • Let’s take a look now at the query management in SharePoint 2013. And we have identified here certain aspects that we will shortly discuss in what follows.Customizations to Query Spelling Correction / Did you mean feature are now managed in the term store. Both inclusions and exclusions can be specified. Spelling correction terms are managed at farm level.You can use a thesaurus file to specify synonyms for a single word or multiple words that occur in queries. The query is expanded based on the entries in the thesaurus. Adding such a thesaurus file is still managed through PowerShell. There is one file that includes all synonyms for all languages but you specify a language code for each synonyms to define when the synonym should be applied.[New ranking models for people search, intranet sites, and internet sites. Custom Ranking Model: in SharePoint 2013 you can define custom ranking model for your search results through PowerShell commands. Multiple rank profiles?]Some of the characteristics of the FAST Query Language have made their way into the SharePoint Search Query Language, so we will shortly review the query languages available in SharePoint 2013.Two new features in SharePoint 2013 are query rules and the query builder. Query rules can be used to customize the search results. The query builder is a tool that assists in creating and evaluating search queries, as well as managing how the search results will be sorted.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Query spelling correction – hosted in the termstore. Also, there is still a dynamic dictionary that is created based on content in the index, or you can switch to the static OOB dictionary. [so how was it in 2010?]Changes in relevance:New ranking models for people search, intranet sites, and internet sitesAnalysis of content and user interaction. The new analytics component in SharePoint Server 2013 tracks and analyzes this information and uses it to continuously improve relevance.Query rulesResult sourcesCreate and deploy a thesaurus in SharePoint Server 2013: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219579(v=office.15).aspx
  • Server for Office web appsNumber of items -> number of serversAlso: hybrid configurations
  • ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Note: this is based on the developer training (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/sharepoint/fp123633)Examples using KQL:Using wildcards – searching for items like “Presentation”, “Presenter”isDocument – returns documents containing “Presentation”Author – returns items authored by JonLastName – returns all people whose last name start with PaExamples for using KQL through the REST API:
  • ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Number of queriesTop queriesAbandonedqueriesNo resultqueriesQuery RulesusageCustomReportsIt would be great to have a report picture here. With some real data.  Usage Reports Usage This report shows historical usage information about the site collection, such as the number of views and unique users. Use this report to identify usage trends and to determine times of high and low activity. Number of Queries This report shows the number of search queries performed. Use this report to identify search query volume trends and to determine times of high and low search activity.   Search Reports Top Queries by Day This report shows the most popular search queries. Use this report to understand what types of information visitors are seeking. Top Queries by Month This report shows the most popular search queries. Use this report to understand what types of information visitors are seeking. Abandoned Queries by Day This report shows popular search queries that received low click-through. Use this report to identify search queries that might create user dissatisfaction and to improve the discoverability of content. Then, consider using query rules to improve the query's results. Abandoned Queries by Month This report shows popular search queries that received low click-through. Use this report to identify search queries that might create user dissatisfaction and to improve the discoverability of content. Then, consider using query rules to improve the query's results. No Result Queries by Day This report shows popular search queries that returned no results. Use this report to identify search queries that might create user dissatisfaction and to improve the discoverability of content. Then, consider using query rules to improve the query's results. No Result Queries by Month This report shows popular search queries that returned no results. Use this report to identify search queries that might create user dissatisfaction and to improve the discoverability of content. Then, consider using query rules to improve the query's results. Query Rule Usage by Day This report shows how often query rules fire, how many dictionary terms they use, and how often users click their promoted results. Use this report to see how useful your query rules and promoted results are to users. Query Rule Usage by Month This report shows how often query rules fire, how many dictionary terms they use, and how often users click their promoted results. Use this report to see how useful your query rules and promoted results are to users. See also (on vmsp13): http://vmsp13/sites/SearchTest/_layouts/15/Reporting.aspx?Category=AnalyticsSiteCollection
  • This is how the new search interface looks!Let’s start from the search box. Query suggestion (or autocomplete) guide the user search keywords as the user types. It provides suggestions based on previously searched queries [add info here]Now, the autocomplete experience not only shows you common queries, but actually allows you to navigate back to past results you’ve interacted with.Result blocks- Contain a small subset of results that are related in a particular way (ex: ppt documents appear in a result block when the word presentation is one of the query terms)The refinement panel summarizes and narrows the results. For example, it allows the user to type in a broad query and then drill down in the result set.In SharePoint 2013, the refinement panel reflects more accurately the entities in your content. Until now, deep refiners were only available for FAST Search for SharePoint customers. Deep refinement allows users to see the exact number of documents that match each refinement option in a result set.Visual refiners are available out-of-the-box.Video and audio have been introduced as new content types.Document deep links provides the ability to look at the structure of the document and it works for PowerPoint and Word documents. Text in bigger fonts or underlined text gets extracted and stored, and in the search result you can quickly jump straight to it.---- new slideThe hover panel allows you for example to get a live preview of a document, dive into the document structure, and take actions on a document. A similar functionality in 2010, that allowed users to quickly review documents in the results page, are the visual previews, however these were only available to FAST Search for SharePoint customers.What is more interesting is that the hover card experience changes based on content type. Result types rules determine what type of result you’re looking at and the correct hover panel will be shown based on those rules.It is extensible and customizable to allow you to make search actionable for any content and create a richer experience.---- new slidePeople searchFor people/expertise search, in the hover panel we see past projects, interests, or documents that a persons has worked on (documents relevant to the query). The actions you can take are also contextual. For a person result, you can follow, send email, view profile, while for a video it can play and share.Social recommendations (introduced in this version) are powered by search, and are based on analysis of user’s behavior patterns.Also, people search is now integrated with the core results.You now have more than phonetic search for people names. You have name suggestions as you type which support exact name matching and fuzzy matches (where the spelling is similar but not exact because of phonetic misspellings or typing errors).---- new slideThe first step is finding the right information. The next step is answering to actual questions.Answering questions is about understanding the user intentIf you search for “x x video”, the search has surfaced videos on top. If you search for “x x expert”, the search surfaces people. This is done through the out-of-the-box query rules, and businesses can create their own query rules that can trigger new experiences.Search can go beyond searching for documents. Here is an example of utilizing information in conversations in SharePoint for answering a question.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Things to mention here or later in the presentation:Ranking- click-through relevanceResult sources. In SharePoint Server 2010, scopes and federated locations provided ways to limit searches to a certain set of content or subset of search results. In SharePoint Server 2013, result sources replace scopes and federated locations. You create and use a result source to specify a location from which to get search results and to specify a protocol for getting those results. Question: are query suggestions added at site level? (in 2010, in 2013)Other considerations: Best bets, related searches/queries, stemming, stop words, file formats, fixed (keyword) searches, authoritative pages
  • Enterprise Search in SharePoint 2013

    1. 1. Enterprise Search in SharePointPaula Petcu and Ludvig AldrinFINDWISE
    2. 2. Agenda 1 2 3Find Extend Govern Search Overview Query Management Search Analytics Search User Experience Content Processing and Search Architecture Enrichment
    3. 3. FINDWISE Search DrivenFindability Solutions
    4. 4. Findability by Findwise Negligible Business.value.gained.from.search.technology. High Business!(needs!&!goals) Users.(needs.&.capabili-es) SEARCH e.g.* Search.Technology.(plaAorm.&.func-onality)Simple!Intranet! search!box Informa-on.(quality.&.structure) Organisa-on.(ownership.&.governance). Basic Use.of.search.technology/plaAorm Advanced–2an2holis4c2approach2to2leverage2business2value2with2search2technology
    5. 5. SharePoint 2013 Search ExperienceFind AnswerFind what you’re looking for with Get answers and take action with anintelligent results tailored to you experience that’s always a step ahead
    6. 6. Interact with live previews of documents Deep refiners Dive into the part of the document that matters mostVisual refiners Contextual actions based on the type of document or result
    7. 7. Agenda 1 2 3Find Extend Govern Search Overview Query Management Search Analytics Search User Experience Content Processing and Search Architecture Enrichment
    8. 8. Search Architecture
    9. 9. Agenda 1 2 3Find Extend Govern Search Overview Query Management Search Analytics Search User Experience Content Processing and Search Architecture Enrichment
    10. 10. ExtendFlexible Extensiblequery Search contentmanagement RESTful API processing
    11. 11. Query ManagementIndex Query rules Query languages Client
    12. 12. Simple, easy to use, experience Use rules to not only improve queries for maintaining rules but also the user experienceQuickly create rulesto optimize thesearch experience
    13. 13. Query LanguagesKeyword query FAST querysyntax language SQL query syntaxPreferred method Still available Not available
    14. 14. Search RESTful APIKeywordshttp://server/site/_api/search/query?querytext=`test`Selecting Propertieshttp://server/site/_api/search/query?querytext=`test`! &selectproperties=`Title,Rank`Sortinghttp://server/site/_api/search/query?querytext=`test`! &sortlist=`LastModifiedTime:descending`http://server/site/_api/search/query?querytext=`test`! &sortlist=`LastModifiedTime:descending,Rank:ascending`
    15. 15. Search RESTful APIKeywordshttp://server/site/_api/search/query?querytext=`test`Selecting Propertieshttp://server/site/_api/search/query?querytext=`test`! &selectproperties=`Title,Rank`Sortinghttp://server/site/_api/search/query?querytext=`test`! &sortlist=`LastModifiedTime:descending`http://server/site/_api/search/query?querytext=`test`! &sortlist=`LastModifiedTime:descending,Rank:ascending`
    16. 16. Agenda 1 2 3Find Extend Govern Search Overview Query Management Search Analytics Search User Experience Content Processing and Search Architecture Enrichment
    17. 17. Content Processing Content enrichment web Custom entityCrawl Parsers service call-out extraction Index
    18. 18. Parsers Visual metadataAutomatic !le Deep link for title, author,format detection extraction date
    19. 19. Custom entity extraction Use as re!nersBased on custom Up to 12 custom on top of thedictionaries extractors documents
    20. 20. Content Enrichment Web Service Call-out
    21. 21. Demos Query Custom entityRe!ner counts suggestions extractor
    22. 22. Demo 1: Getting re!ner counts1!2"3Deep re!nersRe!ner countsnot visible
    23. 23. Demo 2: Managing query suggestions1!2"3PowerShellCentral Admin
    24. 24. Demo 3: Add a custom entity extractor1. Create adictionary2. Deploy thedictionary3. Con!gure amanaged property4. Con!gure are!ner
    25. 25. Agenda 1 2 3Find Extend Govern Search Overview Query Management Search Analytics Search User Experience Content Processing and Search Architecture Enrichment
    26. 26. Governance: Search AnalyticsAnalyticsProcessingComponent Reports RecommendationsAnalyze content and Understand and improve Guide users to contentusage patterns search performance relevant to them
    27. 27. Analytics reportsGet insightsthrough reports Act on insights Monitor changesNumber of queries Top queries Query rules usageAbandoned queries No result queries Custom reports
    28. 28. Search recommendations framework Add popular orUser actions Usage events are Information is recommendedproduce usage counted and added to the items web parts to aevents analyzed index site
    29. 29. Summary 1 2 3 Find Extend Govern
    30. 30. Findwise Top 5 Picks in1 2 3 4 5Search people Word to PDF People name Content Deep re!ners &in videos conversion suggestions recommendations visual re!ner
    31. 31. So… what’s next? Attend theCampus Learn more about Download SharePoint Days SharePoint preview conference Get in contact TechNet, MSDN, SharePoint Server 2013 11 – 15 November !ndwise.com SharePoint Team Blog, Preview Las Vegas, Nevada !ndabilityblog.com Findwise Findability Blog #spc12dk slideshare.net/!ndwise @!ndwise

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