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The Coming Revolution in Airspace Operation
 

The Coming Revolution in Airspace Operation

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Preparing for NextGen and SESAR … Today

Preparing for NextGen and SESAR … Today

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    The Coming Revolution in Airspace Operation The Coming Revolution in Airspace Operation Presentation Transcript

    • The Coming Revolution in Airspace Operation: Preparing for NextGen and SESAR … Today A Rockwell Collins eBook By Dave Vos Awareness is half the challenge Senior Director, UAS and Control Technologies Rick Heinrich Director, Strategic Initiatives, Commercial Systems Okko Bleeker Director, Research and Development Europe© Copyright 2010, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners. © Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Authors’ note – The purpose of this eBook is to raise awareness and educate the industry about the breadth of technologies and capabilities necessary to successfully transform the future airspace through NextGen in the United States and SESAR in Europe. It’s not intended to serve as a technical white paper, but a starting point for discussion that highlights the activities, thoughts and goals pursuant to a future integrated airspace. Rockwell Collins does not claim to have all of the answers, but we encourage industry and government worldwide to stay apprised of the progress in this area, and collaborate to help determine what is needed to implement these programs. We encourage our industry to participate and influence requirements, funding and legislation to move aviation transportation into the future. We hope you will find this eBook will serve as a vehicle for initiating thought, dialog and action. Dave Vos, Rick Heinrich and Okko Bleeker Feel free to pass this eBook along to your colleagues in the industry.1© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Other books in the Rockwell Collins eBook series Five Steps to Facilitating the Convergence of Manned and Unmanned Aviation (2008) http://learnmore.rockwellcollins.com Awareness: The Most Critical Step to Facilitate the Convergence of Manned and Unmanned Aviation (2009) http://learnmore.rockwellcollins.com/uas-awareness2© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Table of contents Introduction................................................................................4 Automation.................................................................................6 Efficiency.....................................................................................18 Funding.......................................................................................21 Future-Focused..........................................................................22 Expert Opinion..........................................................................24 About the Authors....................................................................253© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Introduction In the aftermath of the earthquakes that struck Japan in March 2011, a U.S. Air Force Global Hawk provided crucial photos and infrared images to operators of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant amidst levels of radiation too hot for humans. Faced with numerous requests for assistance in surveillance, survivor recovery and assisting in the repair of the damaged nuclear reactors, the U.S. Department of State had to issue a call for autonomous air and ground vehicles to help in the disaster. This isn’t an outlier. Today, UAVs are granted waivers for access to shared airspace to perform the critical missions of assessment and search and rescue after disasters such as fires and flooding in the United States and the earth- quake in Haiti. UAVs are regularly used in patrols along the U.S.-Mexican border, and in a sign of the times, the entire New York Air National Guard fighter wing switched from manned to unmanned aircraft in 2008. In 2010, the U.S. Army marked its millionth UAV flight hour. Each of these events is another step closer to a vision of a ubiquitous, integrated commercial airspace where manned and unmanned systems work side by side. But this integrated airspace will require extensive planning and cooperation.4© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Introduction For the past five years, Rockwell Collins has aspired to be at the forefront of this major global initiative, raising awareness, articulating vision and demonstrating leadership. And we’re proud to report that there has been significant progress: the convergence of manned and unmanned aviation is no longer an issue of “if,” but “when.” Today’s landscape is quite different from when we started: There are numerous pilot programs and tests of new tech- nologies, such as sense and avoid, ground-based sense and avoid, damage tolerance, ADS-B, and more to enable this convergence to happen. Leaders of NextGen (in the United States) and the Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) have identified the use of UAVs in shared airspace as critical and part of the overall plans. The key constituents are working the issues and Rockwell Collins will continue to be actively involved in developing, testing and implementing key enabling technologies in small form factors at affordable price points. That’s why, in this eBook, we turn our attention to the bigger picture of future aviation: how industry and government are furthering the automation and efficiency technologies will enable future air traffic management in a truly inte- grated airspace that includes manned, unmanned, optionally manned, civil, business, commercial and military aircraft. The key to successful air traffic management transformation is increasing automation and enabling greater efficiency. By implementing technologies that enable greater levels of automation and efficiency in aircraft, air traffic manage- ment transformation can be achieved. For clarity of thought, this eBook is divided into four sections. Automation discusses the possibilities and roles played by advanced technologies in data communications, ground systems and aircraft flight management. Efficiency targets technologies and procedures that aim to alleviate the crunch of time, space and energy faced by future flight. Funding outlines some of the current challenges—as well as possible solutions—when it comes to providing the financial backing to make these technologies and processes an operational reality sooner rather than later. The final section, Future-Focused, imagines an airspace beyond most of what’s described in this book, using technologies outlined as building blocks to a truly inspiring and exciting future.5© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationThe Coming Revolution in Airspace Operation: Automation Safe, reliable and optimal flight operations will only occur with the implementation of new air traffic management “next generation” infrastructure, encompassing data communications, ground system automation and “cooperative” aircraft flight management functions. In the United States this infrastructure is being built under the auspices of the NextGen program http://www.faa.gov/nextgen and in Europe it is the SESAR program http://www.sesarju.eu While the programs have distinctive differences, they also share many core technologies, capabilities and processes, including: Cooperative Aircraft Flight Management Functions • Advanced Flight Management Systems • High Reliability and Redundant Avionics • Surveillance including ADS-B Ground System Automation • Automated Takeoff, Landing, Recovery and Avoidance Data Communications • Command and Control • Data Link Communications and networking NextGen Capabilities in Military Aircraft6© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationAdvanced Flight Management Systems Beyond Managed Path Operations Today’s Flight Management System (FMS) provides system guidance to ensure precise operational path management for repeatable operations. This is coupled with a Performance Computer that adjusts the path parameters to align with the various “rules” such as a minimum fuel route or best speed. While these systems work well as we transition to the future “highway in the sky,” additional functionality can ensure more flexible and efficient operations. The FMS not only manages the path but also monitors the position sensors so that the degree of precision can be monitored and reported. This value is called the “containment volume” and is what makes RNP operations unique. But this requires a controlled response to a preplanned route.7© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationAdvanced Flight Management Systems continued... The future promises to allow the Flight Management function to have more control and flexibility to ensure greater fuel economy, trajectory management, and be more responsive to the needs of a changing airspace. In the future, “constraints” will be sent to the FMS and adjustments to the expected trajectory will be calculated by the performance computer functions to allow adjustments for traffic (as reported by ADS-B), weather, obstacles, terrain and other dynamic or static path limitations. The performance computer will monitor those limitations and calculate new responses to ensure that time-based performance can be met with minimal impact to adjacent traffic. High Reliability and Redundant Avionics Key to increasing automation and autonomy in aviation is the assurance that the flight management system (FMS) in civil aviation and mission management system (MMS) in military aviation—as well as the automatic flight controls systems (AFCS) that enable these systems—are mechanically and operationally reliable. For the future airspace to achieve “critical mass,” low cost/high capability AFCS systems must be available for all sizes and classes of aircraft. The built-in integrated functionality of multichannel AFCS means that should the primary system malfunction, the aircraft would automatically poll the remaining components to determine which system will take the lead to safely continue the flight. A variety of integrated systems exist today, ranging from the most sophisticated systems for commercial aircraft to miniaturized and affordable AFCS packages in dual-, triplex- and quad-redundant configurations for Part 25, Part 23, UAV and optionally manned aircraft. Industry experts weigh in: Marion Blakey President and CEO, Aerospace Industries Association, shares her views on NextGen and SESAR. CLICK TO VIEW VIDEO - PART 1.8© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationAdvanced Flight Management Systems continued... Surveillance Including Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) uses a combination of satellites, transmitters and receivers to provide flight crews and ground control personnel with information about the position and speed of aircraft in the area. An ADS-B-capable aircraft uses a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver to derive its precise position from the GNSS constellation. It then combines that position with the aircraft’s altitude and flight identity. ADS-B technology promises a significant upgrade to today’s generation of primary and secondary radar (PSR/SSR) technology. ADS-B in the U.S. ADS-B technology is a cornerstone of the United States’ NextGen future airspace initiative, allowing air traffic controllers and other pilots to gain a more accurate and reliable understanding of the location of aircraft. The FAA will require all aircraft operating in the controlled U.S. National Airspace System to be equipped with ADS-B “Out”—i.e. broadcasting their position to ground controllers and properly equipped aircraft—by 2020.9© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Automation Advanced Flight Management Systems continued... The receiving component of ADS-B, ADS-B “In,” is currently under review by the FAA, with a final recommendation for initial applications projected to be delivered to the FAA by the Aviation Rulemaking Committee by Fall 2011. Ultimately, this technology will allow an aircraft to identify the location of others in its airspace, and can also provide near-real-time information such as weather reports, terrain overlays and flight and landing information. ADS-B can be used in combination with other technologies including Identification Friend or Foe (IFF), multilateration solutions, distributed computing, automatic communications and separation assurance systems to give ground and aircraft coordination functions the ability to monitor, track and proactively maneuver to avoid conflicts within their airspace in range of the system. To view a short video that explains ADS-B click here: http://www.itt.com/adsb/10© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationAdvanced Flight Management Systems continued... ADS-B in Rotary Wing Aircraft ADS-B in Europe The North Sea ADS-B Project Four in five aircraft operating in Europe carry ADS-B today, reflecting The remote locations and often stormy weather Europe’s lead in implementing next generation category capabilities. conditions of the North Sea render offshore plat- However, applications exploiting the aircraft capability are just beginning forms inaccessible by air except via helicopters. In to be used in specific areas, such as over the North Sea (see sidebar). this environment, however, radar surveillance is not available. The European Commission is accelerating use of ADS-B with their mandate for aircraft to equip with ADS-B by 2015, five years ahead of the EUROCONTROL and the Netherlands ATC (LVNL) turned to ADS-B technology for surveillance at U.S. mandate of 2020. ADS-B “Out” is an interim step with the real goal to low altitudes including offshore platform deck move to ADS-B “In” in Europe. See article in Aviation International News: heights and below. The challenge? Existing ADS-B http://www.ainonline.com/news/single-news-page/article/europe-plans-for-2015-ads-b-avionics- performance standards were tuned for fixed wing mandate-20001/ aircraft, and weren’t directly applicable to rotary wing aircraft due to different engines, antennas Another example of ADS-B in use is in Canada. ADS-B “Out” is being used and reliability levels. to extend “radar-like” services in remote regions to manage flight profiles In response, Rockwell Collins collaborated with as aircraft transition into oceanic or remote regions. See article in Nav multiple rotary wing aircraft companies, Canada: EUROCONTROL and the European Aviation Safety http://www.navcanada.ca/navcanada.asp?language=en&content=contentdefinitionfiles%5Cservices%5Cansprogram Agency (EASA) to adapt ADS-B standards to s%5Cads-b%5Cdefault.xml rotary wing aircraft. Tailoring and fielding a Rockwell Collins TDR-94D transponder solution to perform ADS-B functions on helicopters operated by Bristow, CHC, and Dancopter, the team identified necessary modifications to current standards. The project has resulted in adaptation of the ADS-B and aircraft certification requirements, as well as a Rockwell Collins-designed commercial solution being fielded to meet the requirements.11© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationGround System Automation Automated Takeoff, Landing, Recovery and Avoidance Today, commercial aircraft execute automatic landings and UAVs perform auto takeoff and landings on a regular basis. In fact, European airlines fly automatically 98 percent of the time, including approach and landing. But in the case of civil and business aviation, there’s potential for increased use of automation, particularly in the case of an emergency. A pilot study found nearly a third of all respondents had asked another crewmember to take over duties due to incapacitation; in three percent of those cases, respondents indicated safety was threatened. Bringing an emergency autoland system for instances such as incapacitation or disorientation—a technology in regular use on UAVs today—will add a new level of reassurance to manned and civil aviation. In 2009, Rockwell Collins and Hawker Beechcraft demonstrated the ability to adapt unmanned autoland technology to manned systems in an effort to enhance safety in the future airspace. See press release and video: http://www3.rockwellcollins.com/news/page11833.html Industry experts weigh in: Bobby Sturgell Senior Vice President, Washington Operations, Rockwell Collins, shares his views on NextGen and SESAR.12 CLICK TO VIEW VIDEO PART 1.© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationGround System Automation continued... Automated Recovery Pilot programs demonstrating automated avoidance and recovery are occurring in the United States and Europe. In the Unites States, DARPA’s Damage Tolerance program using Rockwell Collins systems has been able to demonstrate the ability of a subscale F/A-18 UAV to recover and land safely automatically after losing 80 percent of its wing, as well as a production Shadow UAV after losing part of its wing. See article in Shephard’s UV Online: http://www.shephard.co.uk/news/uvonline/ausa-10-shadow-damage-tolerance-trials/7564/ Rockwell Collins is adding “one touch safe mode” to its Pro Line Fusion® integrated flight deck systems for business aviation. With a push of a button, a pilot (or passenger) can relinquish control of the aircraft to the autopilot, providing the necessary time for the human pilot time to recover from disorientation or even automatically land the aircraft in an emergency. For more details on the announcement, visit Aviation Week’s June 2011 coverage: http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/jsp_includes/articlePrint.jsp?headLine=null&storyID=news/bca_0611p3.xml Automated Avoidance In Europe, under the SESAR program and announced as part of SESAR’s “Release 2011,” Airbus developed and validated a new completely automated avoidance capability on one of its commercial aircraft. See article in Avionics Magazine: http://www.aviationtoday.com/av/issue/feature/Wheels-Up-For-SESAR_73153.html Industry experts weigh in: Marion Blakey, President and CEO of the Aerospace Industries Association, shares her views on NextGen and SESAR. CLICK TO VIEW VIDEO PART 213© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationData Communications Command and Control (C2) The deployment of UAVs over war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan has highlighted the need for near-human information navigation and exchange capabilities even over remote connections. This battle-hardened technology—called Command and Control data links, or C2—offers great potential to provide similar benefits in the business and commercial transport markets. This technology, separate from CPDLC, guides the airframe itself, allowing for remote navigation and control. While the use of C2 in civilian airspace is still in the dialogue stage, this technology will be crucial for an integrated airspace. To fully implement C2, the industry will require new C2 data links that are in definition and development to ensure that highly available, robust and error-protected information exchanges are built to the same level of certifiability as air transport avionics systems. This will include access to new protected spectrum, new ground networks and advanced avionics systems that can work with both the legacy C2 environment as well as the civil networks used to manage the integrated airspace.14© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationData Communications continued... Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) Today, most communication between aircraft and air traffic controller is delivered via voice. However, when multiplied across the number of aircraft a controller is responsible for at any given moment, voice communication is an often inefficient and time-consuming strategy, particularly when used to transmit common information such as weather forecasts and delays to a number of aircraft operating in the airspace. As part of NextGen and SESAR, this voice communication will be enhanced and eventually virtually replaced by Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC), a technology allowing air traffic controllers to communicate with pilots via a text-based system. Using the system, air traffic controllers will send digital instructions and clearances that will be displayed on a cockpit display system, reducing controller workload and potential errors. More importantly, CPDLC can interact directly with an aircraft’s flight management computer, contributing to process automation while improving accuracy. For NextGen, data link communications were scheduled to begin to replace air traffic control voice communications with initial tower capabilities by 2015. However, at press time for this eBook, the need for additional funding has delayed this ground automation capability until after 2018. In contrast, Europe launched its initial CPDLC technology—the Link 2000+ Program—into daily operations in 2008. The initial set of applications and services enhance the awareness of aircraft transitions from sector to sector and reduce controller workload and improve accuracy by automatically retuning radios as they transmit from one sector to the other. Future refinements and expansions of the message sets are planned to enhance the system. Industry experts weigh in: John Langford, Ph.D., Chairman and CEO, Aurora Flight Sciences, shares his views on SESAR and NextGen CLICK TO VIEW VIDEO.15© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • AutomationNextGen Capabilities in Military Aircraft Similar to commercial aircraft, military aircraft that operate in U.S. and European airspace are currently or will soon be enhanced in preparation for NextGen and SESAR, depending on the aircraft type and regulatory agency mandates: • Many U.S. military aircraft are already undergoing upgrades to their navigation and surveillance systems such as IFF transponders, GPS and Flight Management System (FMS), in preparation for NextGen and SESAR mandates. Access to preferred airspace within Europe is heavily influencing the upgrade planning for the U.S. military’s fixed wing transport and rotary wing aircraft. The U.S. Army is upgrading the FMS on the CH-47F aircraft to meet the Required Navigation Performance (RNP) requirements. See U.S. Army 2011 Posture Statement: https://secureweb2.hqda.pentagon.mil/VDAS_ArmyPostureStatement/2011/information_papers/PostedDocument.asp?id=277 • Controller Pilot Data Link Communications have been implemented on a large number of military air transport aircraft, with the U.S. Air Force having the largest installed base within the U.S. military. • Across the world, autonomy is increasing in the cockpit, whether the “cockpit” is an optionally piloted or unmanned aircraft, or part of a manned business or military aircraft. Piloted operations have reduced from three to two, and now a reduction from two to one pilot is under evaluation. Optionally piloted military aircraft is a concept that is being explored as way to increase mission flexibility without increasing the number of pilots.16© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Automation • The U.S. Army has developed a long-term plan to turn manned helicopters into optionally piloted vehicles through increased automation and autonomy. In the Army’s 25-year roadmap, they project 25 percent of all cargo missions will eventually be flown by optionally piloted helicopters. Evaluations are underway to prove the reliability of optionally piloted helicopters and viability of the goal. Manufacturers such as Sikorsky are investing heavily and testing the OPV concept on their helicopters. See article in Flight International. http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2010/04/22/340810/us-army-strategy-spurs-debate-on-optionally-piloted.html • The U.S. Army is also demonstrating increased automation and autonomy in its aircraft and operations with the Manned-Unmanned System Integration Capability (MUSIC) program and exercise, scheduled for September 2011 at Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah. During this exercise, crews will demonstrate manned-unmanned operations using an AH-64D Apache Block III attack helicopter to control a Gray Eagle UAV payload with the ability to view the surveillance video within the Apache cockpit. See article on Defense Update website. http://defense-update.com/wp/20101029_music-demonstration.html Industry experts weigh in: Michael Toscano, President and CEO, Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, shares his views on NextGen and SESAR CLICK TO VIEW VIDEO17© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • EfficiencyThe coming revolution in Airspace Operation: Efficiency Reducing fuel costs, CO2 emissions and delays are important drivers of NextGen and SESAR, leading the industry to seek greater efficiency through a variety of technologies and procedures, including: • Performance-Based Operations • RNP • WAAS • EGNOS • Other Green Technologies Industry experts weigh in: James Gaughan Executive Vice President and General Manager, Advanced Research and Engineering, Metron Aviation shares his views on NextGen and SESAR. CLICK TO VIEW VIDEO18© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • EfficiencyThe coming revolution in Airspace Operation: Efficiency continued... Performance-Based Operations While they have served the industry well for decades, today’s rule-based air traffic management systems are woefully energy and time inefficient. Performance-based operations—currently implemented on select aircraft, with a system- wide rollout to come online as more planes meet minimum requirements—will allow aircraft to fly a user-preferred, wind-optimized trajectory, saving time and fuel and reducing emissions and noise. In fact, according to the FAA, the efficiencies achieved through NextGen technology and procedural enhancements will result in saving 1.4 billion gallons of fuel between now and 2018. Performance-based operations include a range of navigation tools. NextGen and SESAR implementation plans accommodate a number of these tools, including 4D Navigation, RNP and trajectory-based flight through onboard flight management systems, as well as communication data links and ADS-B In and Out for position information. Required Navigation Performance (RNP) As outlined earlier in this eBook, RNP enhanced by the wealth of information that will be available to aircraft via ADS-B and future data communications will allow for a performance-rich aircraft that’s capable of operating in increasingly congested airspace. The FAA continues to pursue development of standardized RNP approach procedures. Airlines are already implementing and using RNP approaches for more efficient landings. Alaska Airlines, for instance, has saved fuel and reduced emissions by 35 percent utilizing RNP as part of its “Greener Skies” initiative, which began in June 2009, according to USA Today. The airline is the only major U.S. carrier to have an entire fleet equipped with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology that enables RNP procedures. The airline plans to fully equip its sister carrier, Horizon Air, by the end of 2011. Learn more about RNAV and RNP at this FAA website: http://www.faa.gov/news/fact_sheets/news_story.cfm?newsid=10856 Industry experts weigh in: Bobby Sturgell Senior Vice President, Washington Operations, Rockwell Collins, shares his views on NextGen and SESAR.19 CLICK TO VIEW VIDEO PART 2© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • EfficiencyThe coming revolution in Airspace Operation: Efficiency continued... Wide Area Augmentation Service (WAAS) WAAS is the U.S. satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) developed by the FAA to augment GPS, with the goal of improving its accuracy, integrity and availability. With WAAS, pilots can rely on GPS for all phases of flight, including precision approaches to any airport within its coverage area. European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) For the past several years, Rockwell Collins has also been working with the European Commission (EC) and EUROCONTROL on a number of projects sponsored by the EC to develop applications in aircraft that utilize EGNOS, the European SBAS that supplements GPS by reporting on the reliability and accuracy of the signals similar to the U.S. WAAS. Under the initiative, Rockwell Collins became the first avionics provider to provide SBAS-capable receivers to the air transport and business aviation markets with the GPS-4000S SBAS (WAAS/EGNOS) interoperability receiver. Other Green Technologies As a member of a consortium of industry partners led by the Swedish Air Navigation Service Provider Luftfartsverket (LFV), Rockwell Collins is actively involved in the Atlantic-Interoperability Initiative to Reduce Emissions (AIRE) “Green Connections” project as part of the SESAR program. The project demonstrates technology and processes required to perform time-based “gate to gate” operations. When successful, the procedure will reduce fuel use and generate a corresponding noise and gaseous emissions reduction by minimizing path stretching and holding occurrences in today’s normal operating environment. Read article in Airport Business: http://www.airportbusiness.com/web/online/Top-News-Headlines/Rockwell-Collins-Gets-Active-Role-in-AIRE-Green-Connections-Project/1$3843420© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • FundingFunding: Empowering the coming revolution Study says NextGen, SESAR will pay off NextGen and SESAR are some of the most technologically advanced and A recent study by Deloitte LLP indicates the broad initiatives undertaken in aviation, with commensurate pricetags. The long-term savings from global air traffic recent global slowdown, projected austerity in coming years and different management modernization programs legislative priorities have all impacted short- and long-term funding of outweigh their costs by a significant margin, these initiatives. and the net benefit would increase if the modernization efforts were accelerated. The study, “Transforming the Air Transporta- NextGen Funding: Under the FAA Reauthorization legislation, both the U.S. tion System,” concludes a strong business case House of Representatives and U.S. Senate provide language on NextGen for programs such as NextGen and SESAR, and equipage. The House bill requires the FAA to develop a plan to expedite encourages accelerated implementation. The report also highlights that slowing down equipage of commercial and General Aviation (GA) aircraft with NextGen modernization would trim the net benefits technologies based on a public-private partnership. This provision is similar and lengthen the time it would take to recoup to the recently-announced NEXA Capital-ITT NextGen Fund to provide $1.5 the investment. billion in financing to equip aircraft through a loan guarantee program. As http://www.deloitte.com/us/pr/aerospacedefense/airtransportationsystem envisioned the FAA will devote about $300 million to the program and the rest will come from private capital. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-04/itt-joins-nexa-capital-in-1-5-billion-air-control-upgrade-fund.html While the House bill is set to 2008 appropriations levels, it provides slightly higher funding levels for the Operations account with other accounts scaled back. The House bill also calls for an ADS-B In mandate of 2020 and enhance- ments to integrate UAS into the airspace more quickly. Attention will also be focused on the protection of Next Gen funding in the appropriations process during the coming months. SESAR Funding: SESAR funding is being managed by the public-private partnership SESAR Joint Undertaking, a 17-member organization founded by the European Commission and EUROCONTROL. Cofunding from this group amounts to a total of 2.1 billion Euros (approx. $3 billion U.S.).21© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Future-FocusedFuture-Focused Imagining the Future Airspace In much of this eBook we have outlined current or soon-to-be achieved technologies and how they will work together to advance the global airspace. But even that’s not the end. These technologies are just building blocks for future innovations: secure, efficient information pipelines that connect airplanes to ground crews to back offices in a worldwide network. As we realize the potential of this network to deliver information in virtually real time, the possibilities become endless.22© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Future-FocusedFuture-Focused continued... Imagine a future, not so far off, where: • Biometric sensors will speed up security and boarding for passengers while enhancing airport and aircraft safety • Those same sensors will monitor health and activity in the cockpit to assist the crew in every step of the flight • Enhanced sensing, visualization and control technologies will enable nearly flawless on-time performance in all weather conditions • Passenger preferences will follow them into the cabin, ensuring everything from preprogrammed drink orders to customized entertainment experiences featuring their favorite music, television shows and movies at the touch of a fingertip • Unmanned aircraft, securely and safely tethered to the overall system, will perform mundane or dangerous missions in a shared airspace, from shuttling cargo internationally and border patrol to search and rescue operations and disaster monitoring and fighting • Personal aircraft will whisk passengers to destinations as easily as flagging a cab on Broadway in early evening While the ways to implement them can often be different, our industry shares some key ideals: safety, comfort and predictability. Today is an exciting time to be part of the aerospace industry, and with a dedication to innovation and exploration, the future will get us to more places faster, more safely and more efficiently than ever before, and lead us closer to those ideals.23© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Expert OpinionIndustry Experts Weigh In Marion Blakey President and CEO, John Langford, Ph.D. Aerospace Industries Association Chairman and CEO, Link to Video - Part 1 Aurora Flight Sciences Link to Video - Part 2 Link to Video Bobby Sturgell Senior Vice President, Washington Operations, James Gaughan Rockwell Collins Executive Vice President and General Manager, Link to Video - Part 1 Advanced Research and Engineering, Metron Aviation Link to Video - Part 2 Link to Video Michael Toscano President and CEO, Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International Link to Video24© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • The AuthorsAbout the Authors Dr. Vos, formerly founder, CTO and CEO of Athena Technologies, a leading flight control and navigation systems company, joined Rockwell Collins with the acquisition of the company in 2008. Having worked in the unmanned systems industry since its inception, he is a pioneer and a thought leader in the area of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). While still studying for his Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Vos developed a new mathematical approach for treating nonlin- ear, highly timed-variant systems as if they were both linear and time invariant. He proved this approach and the resulting technology with the invention of the world’s first autonomous unicycle. With this success, Vos opened the door to an entirely new field of dynamics and control. Born in South Africa and now a U.S. citizen, Vos is the inventor and developer of Rockwell Collins Control Technologies core David Vos, Ph.D. technology. He holds patents in nonlinear control systems and other areas and has broad experience in guidance and control Senior Director systems. UAS and Control Technologies In August 2007, Vos was appointed by Virginia’s Governor Kaine to Commissioner of the Vint Hill Economic Develop- ment Authority’s Board of Commissioners. In June 2007, Vos was named by Ernst & Young as an Entrepreneur of the Year in the greater Washington area. Vos holds a B.S. in Engineering with Honors in Aeronautical Engineering from the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, an M.S. in Dynamics and Control from MIT, and a Ph.D. in Estimation and Control from MIT, in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.25© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • The AuthorsAbout the Authors Richard Heinrich’s responsibilities include developing business growth strategies and plans for the next generation airspace systems for Rockwell Collins, using Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) services to support Air Traffic Management (ATM) initiatives. Heinrich has over 30 years of experience in the management, design, and development of communications and aviation systems in the aeronautical, military, and commercial environment. Heinrich is an active member of industry organizations including ICAO, RTCA, EUROCAE, and GAMA where he has served on a variety of domestic and international panels for the advancement of the airspace. He has been a key contributor to both the NextGen and SESAR operational concepts. He also serves on the U.S. ADS-B Aviation Rulemaking Committee and on the CASCADE Program Steering Group. His RTCA committee leadership includes the Program Management Richard E. Heinrich Committee (PMC), Integration and Coordination Committee (ICC), and several working groups in support of the NextGen Director Advisory Committee. Strategic Initiatives for the Commercial Systems Business Unit26© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • The Authors About the Authors Okko Bleeker leads Rockwell Collins’ research and development activities in Europe, with a focus on developments in air traffic management and aircraft operations as well as downstream technology requirements both in the civil and the military domains. Prior to joining Rockwell Collins in 1995, Bleeker accumulated more than 20 years of experience with Fokker Aircraft as an aircraft systems designer, with responsibility for flight deck design and function integration. His experience includes seven years of flight crew instruction and training on air transport aircraft types, which has provided a valuable basis for aircraft operations analysis and flight crew operational aspects and human factors. Bleeker served as Lead Engineer Human Factors during the development of the MDF-100, a conceptual regional wide-body aircraft designed jointly by Fokker Aircraft and McDonnell Douglas. Design breakthroughs on that project came to fruition in the Fokker 100, which featured the Cat III fail- operational autolanding avionics package, jointly developed by Fokker and Rockwell Collins. Bleeker was avionics group leader for Fokker Aircraft on that project, with responsibility for system function integration including elec- Okko Bleeker tronic display format design and certification. Following that project, Bleeker Director became Program Manager Corporate Systems Research and Development for Research and Development Europe Fokker Aircraft before transitioning to Rockwell Collins. His present responsibilities include significant involvement with the Single European Sky ATM Research program (SESAR), including activities with EUROCONTROL, the European Commission, the European Defence Agency, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the European Satellite Service Provider (ESSP) and others. Rockwell Collins’ involvement includes projects associated with trajectory based operations, network operations technology, data link functions, UAV traffic insertion, jointly with industrial partners, partners from the Research and Development community, airlines and the military. Bleeker actively participates in a range of European working groups including EUROCAE panels, EUROCONTROL RNAV and performance-based operations panel, EUROCONTROL’s CASCADE program on data link and ADS-B, the precision approach and landing (PALS) working groups in EUROCONTROL and NATO among others.27© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
    • Building trust every day. Rockwell Collins delivers smart communication and aviation electronic solutions to customers worldwide. Backed by a global network of service and support, we stand committed to putting technology and practical innovation to work for you whenever and wherever you need us. In this way, working together, we build trust. Every day. For more information contact: Rockwell Collins 400 Collins Road NE Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52498 800.321.2223 319.295.5100 Fax: 319.378.1172 email: learnmore@rockwellcollins.com www.rockwellcollins.com147-1311-000© Copyright 2011, Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved. All logos, trademarks or service marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.