Planning of chandigarh by le corbusier

47,326 views
47,173 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
5 Comments
54 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
47,326
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
57
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3,622
Comments
5
Likes
54
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Planning of chandigarh by le corbusier

  1. 1. CHANDIGAR CT.LakshmananH B.Arch., M.C.P.
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION The first masterplan He worked on the for the new capital masterplan with his Since punjab was Le corbusier was was assigned to closest assistant, Maxwell fry, janedivided into two parts, approached by American engineer Matthew Nowicki, drew and pierrethe capital was left in punjab government and planner Albert until the latter died in jeanneret were also pakistan there fore and the prime Mayer, who was a a plane crash in involved in the team punjab in india minister of india in friend of Clarence 1950. His duties were of architects required new capital 1951 Stein of Radburn to take the form of fame in New Jersey. architectural control.
  3. 3. ALBERT MAYERMayer wasn’t new to India. In December, 1949, when the Punjab government approached himfor the Chandigarh project, he was already associated with a rural development project atEtawah (Uttar Pradesh), and preparation of master plans for Greater Bombay and Kanpur.Mayer was thrilled with the prospect of planning a brand-new city, and he accepted theassignment although it offered him a modest fee of $30,000 for the entire project. His briefwas to prepare a master plan for a city of half a million people, showing the location of majorroads and areas for residence, business, industry, recreation and allied uses. He was also toprepare detailed building plans for the Capitol Complex, City Centre, and importantgovernment facilities and architectural controls for other areas.
  4. 4. ALBERT MAYER’S MASTER PLANThe master plan which albert mayer produced for chandigarh assumes a fan-shapedoutline,spreading gently to fill the site between the two river beds.At the head of the plan was the Capitol , the seat of the state government, and the CityCentre was located in the heart of the city.Two linear parklands could also be noticed running continuously from the northeast headof the plain to its southwestern tip. A curving network of main roads surrounded theneighborhood units called Super blocks.first phase of the city was to be developed on the north-eastern side to accommodate1,50,000 residents and the second phase on the South-western side for another 350,000people.
  5. 5. Mayer liked “the variation of [Indian] streets, offsetting and breaking fromnarrow into wider and back” and thought that they were appropriate to a landof strong sunlight, At the narrow points, his house design involved an innercourtyard for ventilation with small openings on the street side to protectprivacy. “We loved this little inner courtyard,” Mayer wrote, “for it seemed tous to bring the advantages of coolness and dignity into a quite small house.”Another element in planning was “to place a group of houses around a notvery large court, with the ends somewhat narrowing, which could serve as asocial unit—i.e. a group of relatives or friends or people from the samelocality might live there, with the central area for play, gossip, etc.” Theneighbourhood units were to contain schools and local shopping centres.
  6. 6. The flatness of the site allowed almost complete freedom in creating street layoutand it is of interest to note hat the overall pattern deliberately avoids a geometricgrid in favour of a loosely curving system.The death of nowicki necessitated the selection of a new architect for chandigarh.When mayer resigned, the indian authorities put together a new, europeanplanning team. The two appointed administrators, verma and thapar, decided onthe renowned swiss architect, le corbusier, whose name was suggested by thebritish architects maxwell fry and his wife jane drew.At first, le corbusier was not keen to take the assignment, but was persuaded byverma. Le corbusiers lofty visions and ideals were in harmony with nehrusaspirations.
  7. 7. Le corbusierLe Corbusier requested the assistance of his cousin Pierre Jeanneret.Jeanneret eventually agreed to live on the site as his representative andchief architect.Le Corbusier could then visit India twice a year for a month at a time (hecame to the site 22 times). Thus, Jeanneret, together with Fry and Drew,as senior architects working in India for a period of three years andassisted by a team of 20 idealistic young Indian architects, would detailthe plan and Le Corbusier could concentrate on major buildings.All four of the protagonists were members of the Congres InternationauxdArchitecture Moderne (CIAM).
  8. 8. THREE DISCIPLINESThe discipline of money Le corbuiser once remarked that ”india has thetreasures of a proud culture,but her coffers are empty.” And throughout the projectthe desire for grandness was hampered by the need for strict economy. In workingup his designs,le corbuiser consulted the program for each building as given in thebudget and then prepared the initial project.The discipline of technology Available in quantity, however, was good clay stoneand sand,and,above all’ human labour. The materials of which chandigarh hasbeen constructed are rough concrete in the capitol complex and the centralbusiness district and for most of the city, especially in housing,locally producedbrick.The discipline of climate Besides the administrative and financial regulatonsthere was a law of the sun in india. The architectural problem consists;first to makeshade,second to make a current of air[to ventilate], third to control hydraulics.
  9. 9. AS THE MOST ECONOMICAL AND READILY AVAILABLE MATERIALFOR BUILDING AT CHANDIGARH WAS LOCALLY MADE BRICK.THE FLAT ROOF WAS EMPLOYED THROUGH OUT IN CHANDIGARHHOUSING BECAUSE OF ITS USEFULNESS AS A SLEEPING AREA70% OF THE BUILDING WOULD BE PRIVATE IN ALL THE SECTORS.RESIDENTIAL PLOTS RANGING IN DIMENSIONS FROM 75 SQ.YARDS TO 5000 SQ YARDS.
  10. 10. LE-CORBUISER WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE GENERAL OUTLINES OF THE MASTERPLAN AND THE CREATION OF THE MONUMENTAL BUILDLINGS,WHILE PIERREJEANNERET,MAXWELL FRY AND JANE DREW WERE CHARGED WITH THE TASK OFDEVELOPING THE NEIGHBOURHOOD SECTORS WITH THEIR SCHOOLS,SHOPPINGBAZAARS,AND THE TRACTS OF GOVERNMENT HOUSING.IN THE PROGRAM PRESENTED TO THE ARCHITECTS,13 CATEGORIES OF HOUSESWERE SPECIFIED,EACH CORRESPONDING TO A LEVEL OF GOVERNMENTEMPLOYMENT.SMALL WINDOWS OPENINGS HAVE BEEN CONSISTENTLY EMPLOYED
  11. 11. The city of Chandigarh was the culmination of Lecorbusier’s life.This city is like the man. It is not gentle. It is hard andassertive. It is not practical; it is riddled with mistakes madenot in error but in arrogance.It is disliked by small minds, but not by big ones. It isunforgettable. The man who adored the Mediterranean hashere found fulfillment, in the scorching heat of India.
  12. 12. GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATIONIt was bound by two seasonal choes, or rivulets, the patiali Raoand the Sukhna in the northwest and the south east respectively.It extends in the northeast right up to the foothills of the shivaliks.The region experiences extremes in the climate. The temperaturecould rise to 45 degrees in summer and drop to freezing point inwinter.The direction of the prevalent winds is southeast to the northwestin summer and northwest to the southeast in winter.
  13. 13. the basic framework of the master plan and its components - the Capitol , City Centre, university,industrial area, and a linear parkland - as conceived by Mayer and Nowicki were retained by LeCorbusier.The restructured master plan almost covered the same site and the neighbourhood unit was retainedas the main module of the plan.The Super block was replaced by now what is called the Sector covering an area of 91 hectares,approximately that of the three-block neighbourhood unit planned by Mayer.The City Centre, the railway station and the industrial areas by and large retained their originallocations.However, the Capitol , though still sited at the prime location of the northeastern tip of the plan, wasshifted slightly to the northwest.
  14. 14. THE BIOLOGICALANALOGYLe Corbusier liked to compare the city he planned to abiological entity: the head was the Capitol, the CityCentre was the heart and work area of theinstitutional area and the university was limbs.Aside from the Leisure Valley traversing almost theentire city, parks extended lengthwise through eachsector to enable every resident to lift their eyes to thechanging panorama of hills and sky.
  15. 15. Le Corbusier identified four basic functions of a city: living, working,circulation and care of the body and spirit.Each sector was provided with its own shopping and community facilities,schools and places of worship. “Circulation” was of great importance to LeCorbusier and determined the other three basic functions.By creating a hierarchy of roads, Le Corbusier sought to make every place inthe city swiftly and easily accessible and at the same time ensure tranquilityand safety of living spaces.
  16. 16. THE PERIPHERY CONTROLACT The Periphery Control Act of 1952 created a wide green belt around the entire union territory. It regulated all development within 16 kilometers of the city limit, prohibited the establishment of any other town or village and forbade commercial or industrial development. The idea was to guarantee that Chandigarh would always be surrounded by countryside.
  17. 17. INDUSTRYDespite his bias against industry, Le Corbusier was persuaded toset aside 235 hectares for non-Polluting, light industry on theextreme southeastern side near the railway line as far away fromthe Educational Sector and Capitol as possible. Of this, 136hectares were to be developed during the first phase.In the event of the city expanding southward, Le Corbusiersuggested the creation of an additional industrial area in thesouthern part of the city where a second railway station could beestablished.
  18. 18. SECTORLe Corbusier and his team replaced superblocks with a geometric matrix ofgeneric neighbourhood units, ”sectors”.The new city plan represented a general city that could, like a roman militarysettlement, be placed on any flat piece of land. Le Corbusier claimed that”thefirst phase of existence is to occupy space” and the new plan allowed for suchan expansion.However, the city was planned to house a number of 150 000 inhabitants inits first phase, realized between 1951-66, and 500 000 in its” final stage”.
  19. 19. The neighbourhood itself is surrounded by the fast-traffic road calledV3 intersecting at the junctions of the neighbourhood unit calledsector with a dimension of 800 meters by 1200 meters.The entrance of cars into the sectors of 800 meters by 1200m, whichare exclusively reserved to family life, can take place on four pointsonly; in the middle of the 1200 m. in the middle of the 800 meters.All stoppage of circulation shall be prohibited at the four circuses, atthe angles of the Sectors.
  20. 20. The bus stops are provided each time at 200 meters from the circus so as toserve the four pedestrian entrances into a sector.Thus, the transit traffic takes place out of the sectors: the sectors beingsurrounded by four wall-bound car roads without openings (the V3s).And this (a novelty in town-planning and decisive) was applied at Chandigarh:no house (or building) door opens on the thoroughfare of rapid traffic.
  21. 21. THE SECTORTAKING CHANDIGARH AS AN EXAMPLE,WE MAY SEE AT ONCE THEDEMOCRATIC IDEA WHICH ALLOWS US TO DEVOTE AN EQUAL CARE TOHOUSING ALL CLASSES OF SOCIETY TO SEEK NEW SOCIAL GROUPINGSEACH SECTOR IS DESIGNATED BY NUMBER,THE CAPITAL COMPLEX BEINGNUMBER 1,WITH THE REMAINING SECTORS NUMBERED CONSECUTIVELYBEGINNING AT THE NORTH CORNER OF THE CITY.THERE ARE 30 SECTORS IN CHANDIGARH,OF WHICH 24 ARE RESIDENTIAL.THE SECTORS AT THE UPPER EDGE OF THE CITY ARE OF ABBREVIATEDSIZE.
  22. 22. OPEN SPACESSome 800 hectares of green open space arespread over the approximately 114 squarekilometers of the Capital Project area. Majoropen areas include the Leisure Valley,Sukhna Lake, Rock Garden and many otherspecial gardens. In addition, the sectors arevertically integrated by green space orientedin the direction of the mountains.
  23. 23. LANDSCAPINGLandscaping proceeded side by side with the constructionof the city from the very inception. Three spaces wereidentified for special plantation: the roadsides, spacesaround important buildings, parks and special featuressuch as Sukhna Lake.Le Corbusier’s contribution to landscaping was ofcategorising tree forms. He made a simple analysis of thefunctional needs and aesthetic suitability for the variousareas, devoting special attention to specific roads.
  24. 24. prominent flowering trees are gulmohar (Delonix regia), amaltas (Cassia fistula),kachnar (Bauhinea variegata), pink cassia (Cassia Javanica) and silver oak(Grevillea robusta).Among the conspicuous non-flowering trees one finds kusum (Schleicheta trijuga)and pilkhan (Ficus infectoria) along V3 roadsides.These trees, noted for their vast, thick spreading canopies form great vaultingshelters over many of the city’s roads.In all, more than 100 different tree species have been planted in (Fieus religosa)Chandigarh .
  25. 25. HOUSINGLower category residential buildings are governed by amechanism known as “frame control” to control their facades.This fixes the building line and height and the use of buildingmaterials.Certain standard sizes of doors and windows are specified and allthe gates and boundary walls must conform to standard design.This particularly applies to houses built on small plots of 250square metres or less.
  26. 26. 7 V’sV1 CONNECTS CHANDIGARH TO OTHER CITIESV2 ARE THE MAJOR AVENUES OF THE CITY E.G MADHYA MARG ETCV3 ARE THE CORRIDORS STREETS FOR VEHICULAR TRAFFIC ONLYV4…..V7 ARE THE ROADS WITHIN THE SECTORSThe 7Vs establishes a hierarchy of traffic circulation ranging from: arterial roads (V1), major boulevards(V2) sector definers (V3), shopping streets (V4), neighbourhood streets (V5), access lanes (V6) andpedestrian paths and cycle tracks (V7s and V8s).
  27. 27. PLAN OF THE CITY
  28. 28. THE CAPITOL COMPLEXTHE AREA OF THE GREATEST SYMBOLIC SIGNIFICANCE IN CHANDIGARH WAS THE CAPITOLCOMPLEX , WHICH IN ITS FINAL FORM WAS BASED ON THE DESIGN OF A GRAET CROSS AXISTHE MOST IMPORTANT GROUP OF THE BUILDINGS CONSTITUTING THE CAPITOL- RIGHT, THEPARLIAMENT, LEFT,IN THE BACKGROUND, THE SECRETARIATIN THE FOREGROUND, THE POOL OF THE PALACE OF JUSTICETHE ARTIFICIAL HILLS IN THE FRONT OF THE SECRETARIAT HAVE NOT BEEN CREATED ANDLAID OUT IN ACCORDANCE WITH COEBUSIERS CONCEPTIONSALTHOUGH THE SCENE IS HARMONIUS IN EFFECT, THERE ARE STILL MISSING THEBUILDINGS THAT BELONG HERE, SUCH AS , FOR INSTANCE, THE TOWERS OF SHADOWS
  29. 29. SITE PLAN OPEN HANDGOVERNOR,S PALACE HIGH COURT ASSEMBLY SECRETARIAT
  30. 30. THE SECRETARIAT,1958
  31. 31. RAMP ENCLOCURE SQUARE WINDOWS ROUGH CONCRETE FINISH PROJECTED PORTICOSFREE FACADE SMALL ENTRANCE BIG ENTRANCE
  32. 32. THE HIGH COURT
  33. 33. ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES PARASOL ROOF FORMING ARCHES DOUBLE ROOF GAP LEFT BETWEEN TWO ROOFSCOLOURED MASSIVE PILLARS FULL HT ENTRANCE
  34. 34. REAR VIEW DOUBLE ROOFAPPROACHED THROUGH ROADS ROUGH CONCRETE FINISHED RAMP
  35. 35. THE ASSEMBLY HALL

×