Present simple tense
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Present simple tense

on

  • 2,075 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,075
Views on SlideShare
1,545
Embed Views
530

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
47
Comments
0

3 Embeds 530

http://thehub.wsc.ac.uk 487
http://english3esoa.blogspot.com.es 30
http://www.easylanguageschool.com 13

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Present simple tense Present simple tense Presentation Transcript

  • Present Tenses Mini Tutorial Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • The two present tenses:• Most English verbs have two present tenses, the present simple tense (she thinks)and the present continuous tense (she is thinking).• The present simple tense is used to talk about permanent situations, or things that happen regularly or all the time.• The present continuous tense is used to talk about temporary continuing actions and events, which are just going on now or around now.• Both present tenses can be used to talk about the future, for example: I’ll meet you when you arrive. I’m meeting her next week.Source: Practical English Usage (Third Edition), Michael Swan, Oxford University Press 2005 Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • Look at the form of verbs in the present simple tense:Subject Verb – affirmative formI / you / we / they read like have dohe / she / it reads likes has doesSubject Verb – negative form (do not (don’t) / does not (doesn’t)I / you / we / they don’t read don’t like don’t have don’t dohe / she / it doesn’t read doesn’t like doesn’t have doesn’t doSubject Verb- question formI / you / we / they Do you Do they like…? Do we have…? Do I do…? read…?he / she / it Does he Does she like…? Does it have…? Does it do…? read..? Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • The present simple tense is used to talk about:• Permanent situations and facts (things that are always true): Water boils at 100˚Celsius. (but we say: The kettle’s boiling, shall I make a coffee?) It usually snows in January. (but: Look- it’s snowing!) My phone beeps when I receive a message. (but: Your phone is beeping -turn it off!) Mariana speaks four languages.• Things that happen regularly, repeatedly all the time or never: How often do you come to college? I have classes every day. Megan never eats breakfast. We often have lunch in town. (using always/ never/often/sometimes/ usually + present simple) Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • • Actions that are set by a timetable or schedule: The train leaves at 08:00 and arrives at 08:44. Most shops open at 9am and close at 5pm. My class starts at 9.15. Emily works very hard. She starts at 7.30 and finishes at 8 o’clock in the evening. (This use of the present is used to describe ‘timetabled’ future events.)• Actions that take place one after another, for example in instructions, demonstrations, commentaries and present tense stories: First take a bowl and break two eggs into it. Next take a fork and beat the eggs…. How do I get to the station? You go straight on to the traffic lights, then turn left…. Taylor passes to Beckham, Beckham shoots…and it’s a goal!! Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • • Talking about states and physical and emotional feelings: I love my course. Maria likes my new hairstyle. I believe you. How do you feel? (OR How are you feeling?) My head aches. (OR My head is aching.) Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • Spelling Rules for present simple tense verbs with he/she/it Rule Examples work worksWith most verbs, add –s sit sits stay staysVerbs ending in consonant + y: change y to i cry criesand add –es hurry hurries reply repliesBUT vowel + y: enjoy enjoys miss misses buzz buzzesVerbs ending in -s, -z, -ch or -x: add -es watch watches push pushes fix fixesExceptions: have has go goes do doesNOTE: vowels = a, e, i, o, u and consonants = all other letters of the alphabet. Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • The present continuous tense Subject Verb- affirmative I am I am waiting. he / she / it is He is working. you / we / they are They are listening.Subject Verb- negativeI am not ( ‘m not) I’m not listening.he / she / it is not ( isn’t ) She isn’t going.you / we / they are not ( aren’t ) We aren’t working.Subject Verb- question formI am I? Am I going?he / she / it is it? Is it working?you / we / they are you? Are you listening? Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • The present continuous tense is used to talk about:• Temporary actions and situations that are going on now or around now: What are you doing? I’m writing an email. Hurry up! We are all waiting for you. Why are you laughing? She’s working in London at the moment. (but the job is not permanent)• Repeated actions happening around the present: He’s getting a lot of headaches at the moment. Why is he hitting the dog? I’m travelling a lot these days. Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • • Developments and changes: Your son is getting bigger every day! House prices are going up again. The weather is getting warmer.• Future arrangements and fixed plans, when the time and place have been decided: What are you doing tomorrow? What are we having for dinner? I’m seeing Dora on Saturday. We’re visiting my aunt in Australia next year. Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College
  • Practice!Now click on the links below this tutorial topractice using the present simple and presentcontinuous tenses. Created by Heather Hava TLA (Additional Learning & Language Support) West Suffolk College