Prediction and Inference:  A Reading Strategy
What is prediction? <ul><li>A prediction is what you think will happen based upon the text, the author, and background kno...
What is inference? <ul><li>Inference is reading all of the clues and making your best guess. </li></ul><ul><li>Inference i...
What is the difference between prediction and inference? <ul><li>When you make predictions, your prediction will be proven...
When do you make predictions? <ul><li>As a reader, you can make predictions a text BEFORE reading. </li></ul><ul><li>As a ...
When do you make inferences? <ul><li>As a reader, you can make inferences DURING reading. </li></ul><ul><li>As a reader, y...
How do you make predictions? <ul><li>Ask yourself what is going to happen next in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yoursel...
How do you make inferences? <ul><li>Inferences are made by questioning during the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself ab...
Questions to predicting in a text? <ul><li>What is happening in the story? </li></ul><ul><li>What will happen next? </li><...
Questions to inferring in a text? <ul><li>What will happen next and why? </li></ul><ul><li>What clues have led you to thin...
Your turn to predict and infer the text. <ul><li>At this point, a selected text will be read to the class.  Be sure to pau...
Now your turn to predict/make inferences about the text. <ul><li>Turn to a partner and discuss the text.  </li></ul><ul><l...
Conclusion <ul><li>Inferring requires the reader to ask questions during reading. Predicting requires the reader to ask qu...
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Predictions and inferences differences

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  • The predictiona dnd inference power point helped me a lot on my lesson for PDAS. It was easy to introduce the concept with the power point. I feel that my students were able to get the concept of inferencing very well. Thanks!
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Predictions and inferences differences

  1. 1. Prediction and Inference: A Reading Strategy
  2. 2. What is prediction? <ul><li>A prediction is what you think will happen based upon the text, the author, and background knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Prediction is an educated guess as to what will happen. </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is inference? <ul><li>Inference is reading all of the clues and making your best guess. </li></ul><ul><li>Inference is similar to prediction but they are not the same. </li></ul><ul><li>When inferring, you are using all clues to draw conclusions about what is being read. </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is the difference between prediction and inference? <ul><li>When you make predictions, your prediction will be proven by the end of the story. When inferring, you may or may not know the answer to your question by the end of the story. </li></ul><ul><li>When predicting, you are focusing on what will happen in the story. When inferring, you are making a guess about what a character will do, how a character feels, and other judgments. </li></ul><ul><li>Prediction = answered by the end of the story </li></ul><ul><li>Inference = may or may not be answered by the end of the story </li></ul>
  5. 5. When do you make predictions? <ul><li>As a reader, you can make predictions a text BEFORE reading. </li></ul><ul><li>As a reader, you can make predictions a text DURING reading. </li></ul><ul><li>In other words, make predictions before and during reading. </li></ul>
  6. 6. When do you make inferences? <ul><li>As a reader, you can make inferences DURING reading. </li></ul><ul><li>As a reader, you need to ask yourself questions as you read and make inferences based on what you have read. These inferences may not be about what will happen next. </li></ul>
  7. 7. How do you make predictions? <ul><li>Ask yourself what is going to happen next in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself what else could happen in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>To make predictions before and during reading, you must question yourself. </li></ul>
  8. 8. How do you make inferences? <ul><li>Inferences are made by questioning during the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself about why a character does something, how a character feels, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>To make an inference during reading, you must question yourself. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Questions to predicting in a text? <ul><li>What is happening in the story? </li></ul><ul><li>What will happen next? </li></ul><ul><li>What clues have led you to think that? </li></ul><ul><li>What else could happen next? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Questions to inferring in a text? <ul><li>What will happen next and why? </li></ul><ul><li>What clues have led you to think that? </li></ul><ul><li>Why did that character do that? </li></ul><ul><li>How does that character feel? </li></ul><ul><li>Why did the author write this story? </li></ul><ul><li>Inference allows for many more questions than prediction. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Your turn to predict and infer the text. <ul><li>At this point, a selected text will be read to the class. Be sure to pause as you read the text to allow for students to turn and talk. Show the next slide while reading the text. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Now your turn to predict/make inferences about the text. <ul><li>Turn to a partner and discuss the text. </li></ul><ul><li>Be sure to make a prediction about what will happen next. </li></ul><ul><li>Be sure to make an inference about why a character may have done something. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember, predicting and inferring are ways to make sure you understand a text. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Conclusion <ul><li>Inferring requires the reader to ask questions during reading. Predicting requires the reader to ask questions before and during reading. </li></ul><ul><li>Making inferences/predictions are a way to check for understanding. </li></ul><ul><li>Making inferences/predictions require the use of additional strategies to ensure comprehension. </li></ul><ul><li>Your prediction will be proven/disproved by the end of the reading. Your inference may or may not be proven. </li></ul>
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