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Making Inferences

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Making Inferences

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Making Inferences

  1. 1. Making Inferences
  2. 2. Inference: A conclusion reached on the basis of evidence and reasoning. For EXAMPLE, I infer that there is a ghost in my house based on the evidence that I have seen objects moving on their own.
  3. 3. Inference: A conclusion reached on the basis of evidence and reasoning. For EXAMPLE, If my best friend stops talking to me, I can infer that he is angry at me, or he think’s I’m crazy and doesn’t want to be seen with me.
  4. 4. Inference: When you read, you need to make inferences about things happening in the story. (This process will help you write your essay at the end of the unit). For EXAMPLE, If I read that the main character hates old people, but then later becomes friends with an old person, I can infer that a theme of this story relates to “challenging your prejudices.”
  5. 5. Inference: An inference is not based solely on your opinion. It is based on EVIDENCE. In a story, everything you read in the text (what characters say or do, what events happen in the plot, etc.) can be used as the basis for making an inference. THE TEXT SAYS: The main character hates old people. I CAN INFER… That the main character has a mean and childish personality.
  6. 6. Things to make inferences about: Character development (how a character’s personality or motivation changes over the course of the story) Themes (what messages/morals are revealed to the readers over the course of the story) Symbols (what things in the story represent (symbolize), and how those symbols are developed over the course of the story). Plot (how the author develops, progresses, and resolves conflicts over the course of the story).
  7. 7. Inference: Making an inference can be thought of as “reading between the lines” of what you read or observe. Clues in the book + My own thinking = Inference!
  8. 8. Activity: Make inferences based on evidence in images and text. Open your JOURNAL. Title this journal entry: “Making Inferences”. Answer the following questions in your journal…
  9. 9. #1) What can you INFER about this character’s personality?
  10. 10. #1) What evidence is your inference based on?
  11. 11. #1) Example: Inference: The woman is jealous and very emotional. Evidence: I think she is jealous because she is upset to see a couple kissing. (Presumably, she would rather be kissing the man). I think she is a very emotional person because she is crying.
  12. 12. #2) What can you INFER about this character’s personality?
  13. 13. #2) What evidence is your inference based on?
  14. 14. #3) What can you INFER about this character’s personality?
  15. 15. #3) What evidence is your inference based on?
  16. 16. #4) What can you INFER about the personalities of BOTH characters?
  17. 17. #4) What evidence is your inference based on?
  18. 18. #5) What can you INFER about the relationship between these characters?
  19. 19. #5) What evidence is your inference based on?
  20. 20. #6) What can you INFER about the situation taking place in this image? (what do you think is happening here?)
  21. 21. #6) What evidence is your inference based on?
  22. 22. Activity: Make inferences based on evidence in a short film. Answer the following question in your journal… What is the THEME of this story, and what evidence can you find to support your inference?
  23. 23. Inference Notes: In this note-taking style, you will write observations from the text in column 1, and you will write what you can infer from that observation in column 2.
  24. 24. Inference Notes: Example

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