Stars strategy info

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  • Stars strategy info

    1. 1. FD MP AP CC FO readingMI WM strategiesUS SU FL CE DC Modified from STARS books.
    2. 2. FINDING THE MAIN IDEAThe main idea of a text is a sentence that tellsyou what the passage is mostly about.Questions about the main ideas might: What is the text mostly or mainly about? What is the best title for the text. When answering ask yourself, What is the passage mostly about? MI
    3. 3. RECALLING FACTS AND DETAILSEvery text has facts, details and information. These facts tell us more about the main idea. Questions about facts and details ask you something that was stated in the text. Look back at the text to find the answer. F
    4. 4. understanding sequenceA text can sometimes be told in sequence ororder. Different things happen in the beginning/ middle and end. Questions about sequence ask you to put details in order. Words often used, first, then, last, after or US before.
    5. 5. RECOGNISING CAUSE AND EFFECTA cause is something that happens.An effect is something that happens becauseof the cause. “I forgot to set my alarm clock (cause), so I was late to school (effect). Cause and effect questions usually start with why, what happened, because. CE
    6. 6. COMPARING AND CONTRASTINGThese questions ask you how two things arethe same or different. Likeness and differences. Questions about C&C often contain: most like, different, alike or similar. C
    7. 7. making predictionsA prediction is something you think willhappen in the future. What will (probably) happen next? What is most likely to happen? Use the clues in the text to answer these questions. MP
    8. 8. drawing conclusions and making inferencesWhen you read, many times yo umsut figureout things on your own.The author does not always tell youeverythjing. Look for the clues in the text. Questions about drawing conclusions often contain the key words: you can tell or probably. D
    9. 9. finding word meaning in contextSometimes you may not know a word whenreading.Often you can tell the meaning of the word bythe way the word is used in the sentence. Thisis called understanding word meaning incontext. If you have trouble choosing an answer, try each answer choice in the sentence where the word appears in the passage. See which answer choice makes the most sense. WM
    10. 10. distinguishign between fact and opinionFind which statements in the text are fact.Find which statements in the text are opinion. A FACT is something true. A FACT you can prove. An OPINION tells you how someone feels about something. F You cannot prove OPINIONS.
    11. 11. SUMMARISINGQuestions about the best summary of apassage ask you about the main points of thepassage. Ask yourself what is the main idea about the text. A good summary is closer ot the main idea than to any single detail found in the passage. SU
    12. 12. SUMMARISINGQuestions about the best summary of apassage ask you about the main points of thepassage. Ask yourself what is the main idea about the text. A good summary is closer ot the main idea than to any single detail found in the passage. SU
    13. 13. INTERPRETING FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE Writers use words in a way that their meaning is different from their usual meaning. Eg. ‘I spilled the beans.” is an example of figurative language. - They mean not to tell a secret. F

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