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A Mobile Application for School Children controlled by External Bluetooth Devices

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Defense of Master thesis, TU Graz 2018

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A Mobile Application for School Children controlled by External Bluetooth Devices

  1. 1. A Mobile Application for School Children controlled by External Bluetooth Devices Valdrin Maloku Supervisor: Priv.-Doz. Dipl.-Ing.Dr.techn. Martin Ebner June, 2018 MASTERS THESIS DEFENSE
  2. 2. Outline ● Introduction ● Digital Game-Based Learning ● Mobile-Based Learning ● Innovative Technologies for Education and Learning ● Prototype – 1x1 Trainer Flic ● Evaluation and Results
  3. 3. Introduction ● Learning dimensions of computer games ● Main research questions:  How can seamless learning be effective using innovative devices for learning mathematics?  What can be concluded from the evaluation of the learning activity in a third school class?
  4. 4. Digital Game-Based Learning ● Why use games for learning:  Why game design and adoption is needed as vehicles for learning "serious" content and subject matter?  Our learners have changed radically (different minds from their parents)  These learners need to be motivated in new ways (motivation & engagement)
  5. 5. Digital Game-Based Learning ● How learners have changed:  New students of today → Digital Natives  Not born in the digital world but have adapted it → Digital Immigrants
  6. 6. Digital Game-Based Learning  Ten ways digital natives are different:  Twitch speed vs. Conventional Speed  Parallel processing vs. Linear Processing  Random Access vs. Linear Thinking  Graphics First vs. Text First  Connected vs. Stand-Alone  Active vs. Passive  Payoff vs. Patience  Fantasy vs. Reality  Play vs. Work  Technology as Friend vs. Technology as Foe
  7. 7. Digital Game-Based Learning ● Why it works:  Engaging process → main reason children play  Motivating elements → fun, play, rules, goals, interactivity, adaptivity, conflict/competition/challenge/opposition, characters and story, ...  Engaging power of computer games vs. Set of interactive learning processes → learning package  Content vs. Player → well-matched
  8. 8. Digital Game-Based Learning ● Effectiveness:  How effective is digital game-based learning?  The measure of effectiveness (“true learning”) → behaviour change  Digital game-based learning method vs. Other methods → head to head comparison  Practice → key success of mastering the game
  9. 9. Digital Game-Based Learning ● Designing Games as Learning Tools:  Why it is hard?  Fun of a real game & Educational content → not an easy task  Designer:  Entertainment game  Educational game
  10. 10. Digital Game-Based Learning ● Known Risks of digital game-based learning:  Long time standing in front of video games  Players try more to win than to learn  Employees do not focus on collaboration  Aggressive Content & Graphic violence  Affection on behaviour, thoughts, problem-solving styles and social skills of children  Affection on player's emotional state → hostility and anxiety  Monetary issues  Pupils spend their school money  Pupils steal money from their parents
  11. 11. Mobile-Based Learning ● Mobile devices:  Laptops, tablets, e-book readers, mobile phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), …  Promotes cooperative learning, exploratory learning and game-based learning
  12. 12. Mobile-Based Learning ● How mobile technologies are changing the way children learn :  New technology → take pictures, record sounds, tag artistic creations, share data in social networks, ...  Physical experience ↔ Abstract knowledge  Important applications:  Lecture room evaluating system → Figure 1  Lecture room collaborative system using SMS (Short Message Service) → Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 2
  13. 13. Mobile-Based Learning ● Mobile learning activities:  Physical exercise games → Figure 1  Conceptual phenomena  Advantages: motor abilities, pattern recognition, rhythm coordination  Field trips and visits → Figure 2  Investigation skills → visiting museums, forest, cavern, etc (historical data, envrionmental data, social data)  Predictions, generate hypothesis, analyze their data Figure 1 Figure 2
  14. 14. Mobile-Based Learning ● Mobile learning activities:  Content creation → Figure 1  Story composing and filmmaking Figure 1 ● Challenges:  Small screens, limited storage capacities, battery life, wireless bandwidth, connection to a network
  15. 15. Innovative Technologies for Education and Learning ● Instant Messaging (IM):  Interactive and real-time synchronous communication  Examples: Kik Messenger, Yahoo! Messenger, WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, WeChat, Viber, …  Collaborative coordination and problem-solving  Advantages → accessibility and acknowledgment by students, social presence, synchronous communications, encourages teamwork, reduces formality in communications  Disadvantages → distracted attention, time waster, time consuming for educators
  16. 16. Innovative Technologies for Education and Learning ● Blogs (Weblogs):  Documentation of learning, Critical reflection, Self-investigation  Different forms:  The personal journal/diary  Knowledge-based logs  Filter blogs  Benefits of Weblogs → use learning approaches and conceptions of:  Guided discovery  Directive learning  Receptive learning  Advantages → reflection and critical thinking are encouraged, social presence, development of learning community, active learning  Disadvantages → controlled primarily by blog author, editing/modifications not open as in wiki
  17. 17. Prototype – 1x1 Trainer Flic ● Overview ● Main Concept ● Focus ● Flic Button → Figure 1 ● Platform → Android Figure 1
  18. 18. Prototype – 1x1 Trainer Flic ● Gameplay and Game elements  Play mode → Offline mode Main Menu Game Activity Level Results Statistics
  19. 19. Prototype – 1x1 Trainer Flic ● Gameplay and Game elements  Trainer mode → Online mode Main Menu Login Activity Levels Jokers Settings
  20. 20. Prototype – 1x1 Trainer Flic ● Algorithm  Difficulty of the exercise  Degree of competence → Figure 1  Pretest → Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 2
  21. 21. Prototype – 1x1 Trainer Flic ● Algorithm  Classification of answers  0 → wrong answer  1 → the user knew the right answer once  2 → the user gave two correct answers in sequence (well-known)  Selection of questions  Three categories from which the questions are generated:  Extended and Actual Learning Area (questions written with 0)  Actual Learning Area (questions written with 1)  Actual Learning Area (questions written with 2)  A random number out of 0 and 1 is chosen to decide which category is initiated. There are three conditions:  Condition 1 – if the random number x <= 0,05 a well-known question (2) is selected  Condition 2 – if the random number is 0,05 > x >= 0,15 a known question (1) is selected  Condition 3 – if the random number is x > 0,15 an unknown question not in extended and actual learning area is selected
  22. 22. Prototype – 1x1 Trainer Flic ● Evaluation  Evaluation arrangement  Game presentation  Game activity  Evaluation ● Evaluation results  Statement 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 → Figure 1  Effectiveness → Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 2
  23. 23. Thank You!

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