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SALESMANSHIP
     UNIT – 3


                 By-
                Shoma Chatterjee
MEANING
 Salesmanship is an art of selling
goods and services of the seller to
buyers.
 It is seller-initiated effort that
provides prospective buyers with
information and motivates or
persuades them to make
favorable buying decisions
concerning the seller’s products
or service.
DEFINITION
 The American Marketing Association defined
the term ‘salesmanship’ as “ the personal or
impersonal process of assisting and/or
persuading a prospective customer to buy a
commodity or service to act favorable upon an
idea that has commercial significance to the
seller.
Features of Salesmanship
Salesmanship is an art
Personal service
Art of attracting and persuading
customers
Art of converting desire into necessity
Buyer’s confidence
Consumer satisfaction
Establishment of permanent relations
Service for producer, distributor and
consumer
Mutual benefit
Educative process
Importance of Salesmanship
Important to producers
Important to customers
Important to salesman
Important to government
Important to society
Scope of Salesmanship
• transport
• repairing
• teaching
• painting
• banking
• legal
• medicine
• insurance, etc.
Salesmanship in its higher levels includes the subject-matter of:-
   –   product knowledge,
   –   knowledge of customers,
   –   training and control of salesman,
   –   organization and management of sales departments, etc.
Advantages of Salesmanship
Salesmanship helps in preventing the piling up of
huge stocks.
Salesmanship helps in creating demand for the
goods which leads to increase in production.
Salesmanship is the best means of two-way
communication b/w the company and customer.
Increase in sales helps to increase the profits.
Increased sales induced business activity which
provides more employment and higher income for
the community.
Consumers are benefitted as salesmen provide them
great deal of useful information.
Limitations of Salesmanship
High cost of personal selling.
Salesmanship adopts the methods of pressure
selling.
Good and competent sales person are scarce.
Personal Selling
• According to American Marketing Association,
  “oral presentation is a conversation with one
  or more prospective customers for the
  purpose of making sales.”
• It is most important of all the market efforts of
  an enterprise because through personal
  selling consumers are encouraged more.
Characteristics of Personal Selling
It is the method of direct selling .
It involves oral communication between buyer and
seller.
In personal selling, the seller wants to convince the
buyers to sell his product.
It involve the sale of goods and services personally.
It is most effective tool of increasing the sales.
It helps in providing many important information to
the enterprise regarding the market.
It is essential for the survival of business.
Nature Or Functions Of Personal
              Selling
Making sales
Advertise the new product
Service to customers
Executive functions
Records of the sales
Collect statistics
Importance of Personal Selling
• Helpful in selling
• Demonstrating the product
• Helpful in removing the doubts & confusions
  of customers
• Helpful in communication
• Knowledge of prospective buyers
• Important from buyer’s point of view
• Important to the society
Limitations of Personal Selling
• Increase in the cost of sales
• Difficulty of reporting at right time
• Lack of efficient salesman
Types Of Personal Selling

• Selling for retailer or consumer salesmanship
• Selling for wholesaler or merchant
  salesmanship
• Selling for manufacturers
Types Of Sales Executives
1. Order getting salesman
    Manufacturers order getting salesmen:
    these sales men deal with industrial products and raw
    material. Their main function is to receive orders in
    bulk quantity for their manufacturers.
    Wholesale order getting salesmen:
    the salesmen of this nature, receive orders from the
    retailers by strolling in the markets for wholesalers.
    Retailer order getting salesmen:
    these salesmen receive order from consumers by
    visiting door-to-door and convincing them for the
    retailers.
2. Order taking salesman:
  These salesmen receive bulk orders and sometimes, receive the
  payment for products immediately delivered to the buyers. These
  salesmen work for manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers too.
3. Supporting salesman:
  Such salesmen neither receive orders for any person nor do the
  sale. They help the manufacturer in order to increase the sale in
  the common course of business in their respective areas.
     Missionary salesmen : also known as pioneer salesmen. They
     act as communication media amid the manufacturers,
     wholesalers and the retailers. He creates the demand for the
     products and thus, enhances the popularity of the institution.
     Salesmen of mechanical expertise : these salesmen generally
     are highly qualified engineers or expert mechanics. they are
     sent to those consumers / buyers who face any problem,
     difficulty or grievance. They restore the confidence of the
     customers on product and provide them with satisfaction by
     solving the problem.
Qualities Of Sales Executives
Ability to define position’s exact functions and duties
 in relation to the goals the company should expect to
 attain.
Ability to select and train capable subordinates and
 willingness to delegate sufficient authority to enable
 them to carry out assigned tasks with minimum
 supervision.
Ability to utilize time efficiently.
Ability to allocate sufficient time for thinking and
 planning.
Ability to exercise skilled leadership.
Theories of Personal Selling
   AIDAS Theory Of Selling
   Right Set Of Circumstances
   Buying Formula Theory
   Behavioral Equation Theory
AIDAS Theory of Selling
 A      ATTRACT ATTENTION

  I       SUSTAIN INTEREST

 D         CREATE DESIRE

 A       INDUCTING ACTION

 S      BUILDING SATISFACTION
• ATTRACT ATTENTION

• SUSTAIN INTEREST

• CREATE DESIRE

• INDUCTING ACTION (clarify objections and
                close the sale)

• BUILDING SATISFACTION (activities after the
                     sale)
Right Set Of Circumstances
• This theory can be summarized as “ everything
  was right for that sale”.
• Also called “Situation Response theory”.
• In particular circumstances we respond in a
  particular way .
• Salesperson needs to present PROPER STIMULI or
  APPEALS so that desired response is resulted
• Seller oriented Theory
• External Factors vis-à-vis Internal Factors
• Focus on the external factors at the expense of
  Internal Factors
• This theory sometimes is also called “Situation
  Response theory”, had its psychological origin
  in experiments with animals and holds that
  the particular circumstances prevailing in a
  given selling situation cause the prospect to
  responding a predictable way.
• If the sales person succeeds in securing the
  attention and gaining the interest of the
  prospect, and if the salesperson presents the
  proper stimuli or appeals, the desired
  response will result.
• Furthermore the more skilled the salesperson is in
  handling the set of circumstances, the more
  predictable is the response. The set of circumstances
  includes factors external and internal to the prospect.
  Example,
  Suppose a salesperson sales to the prospect, “Let’s go
  out for lunch”.
  The salesperson and the remarks are the external
  factors. But at least 4 factors internal to the prospect
  affect the response. These are the presence or the
  absence of desires
(1)First to go out for lunch
(2)To have it now
(3)To go out
(4)To go out with salesperson
• Proponents of this theory tend to stress external
  factors and at the expense of internal factors.
  They seek selling appeals that evoke desired
  responses. Sales personnel who try to apply the
  theory experience difficulty traceable to internal
  factors in many selling situations, but the internal
  factors are not readily manipulated. This is a
  seller oriented theory: it stresses the importance
  of the salesperson controlling the situation, does
  not handle the problem of influencing the factors
  internal to the prospect, and fails to assign
  appropriate weight to the response side of the
  situation response interaction.
Buying Formula Theory
• Buying Formula Theory Emphasizes the
  Buyer’s side of the Buyer Seller Dyad Buyer’s
  needs or problems receive the major attention
  and the salesperson’s role is to find solution
  Buying formula is a schematic representation
  of a group of responses arranged in a
  psychological sequence Emphasizes the
  Prospect’s responses
Buying Formula Theory
• Simplest Model:
  Need (Problem) – Solution – Purchase
  Outcome of a purchase affects the chance that
  a continuing relationship will develop between
  buyer and seller
  Need (Problem) – Solution – Purchase-
  Satisfaction
• Need is always satisfied by a solution in terms
  of product or services accompanied by
  respective Trade or Brand Name
  Need (Problem) – Solution – Product or
  Service/ Trade or Brand Name - Purchase-
  Satisfaction
• To ensure purchase, the product or service &
  the Trade Name must be considered adequate
  and the buyer must experience feeling of
  anticipated satisfaction
• Emphasis should be placed depending upon
  kind of circumstance
• Need or Problem should be emphasized if
  Prospect does not feel a need
• Association between need and Product must
  be emphasized if Prospect does not connect it
• Association between Brand and Product to be
  emphasized if Prospect fails to connect it
• In case of competition, emphasis should be on
  developing the adequacy of the brand name
  and pleasant feelings around it.
Product

Need Of                      Purchase   Satisfaction
Problem

             Brand



             Adequence


            Product

Need Of                      Purchase   Satisfaction
Problem

             Brand


          Pleasant Feeling
Behavioral Equation Theory
• Buying Behavior in terms of the purchasing process
  viewed as phases of learning process .
Four Essential Elements:
• Drives: Strong Internal Stimuli that impel the buyer’s
  action
   – Innate Drives
   – Learned Drives
Eg. : Innate drive –you are hungry
      Learned drive – you want to have burger
• Cues: Stimuli that will determine when buyer will
  respond
   – Triggering Cues
   – Non Triggering Cues
• (i)Triggering cue – activates decision process for a given
  product and evokes you to buy a product. For example :
  you are hungry and want to have burger
• (ii) Non – triggering cue – influences the decision process
  but not activate. It can be of two types for the product
  which helps to make opinion for decision process and the
  information which you get from advertisements, sales
  promotion etc. For example :You believe McDonalds
  provides the cheap and the best burger with quickest
  service time
• Specific product / information – also functions as triggering cue.
  For
  example special offers/discounts on cold drink and French fries
  with the burger.
• Response: What buyer does
       Example buyer can purchase or not
• Reinforcement: Event that strengthens the buyer’s tendency to
  make a particular response
       Example: convenience, time saving and money factor
• Behavioral Equation:
     B = P*D*K*V
  B – Response or purchase of brand
  P – Predisposition
  D - Present drive level
  K - Incentive Potential
  V – Intensity of all cues
B       =     P        *         D       *       K          *        V

Response         Force of       Drive level       Value of the       Intensity of
purchasing       habit          or                product to         all ques
                                motivation        provide
                                                  satisfaction
Selling Process
   Pre-sale preparation
   Prospecting and canvassing
   Approaching
   Sales presentation
   Demonstration
   Handling objections
   Closing the sale
   Follow-up
Pre-sale Preparation
• Presales is a process or a set of activities normally
  carried out before a customer is acquired, though
  sometimes presales also extends into the period
  the product or service is delivered to the
  customer.
• It is the first step in personal selling. They must be
  properly selected, trained, and motivated for the
  job.
• They must be fully familiar with the producer, the
  product, the market and the selling techniques.
• Both the product knowledge and the company
  knowledge must be aware of.
Prospecting and Canvassing
• It refers to locating the potential buyers for the product
  and satisfying buyers about the product and screen
  them to make sure that their sales efforts will not go
  waste.
• A salesman should examine the need of the buyers and
  their capacity to buy the product.
• He should always remember that every one cannot be
  a prospect.
• While "Selling" is the art of convincing someone to
  make a purchase, "Prospecting" is really the science of
  setting aside or disqualifying suspects who don't fit the
  right profile so your sales process can focus on the
  most profitable candidates.
Approaching
• Before calling on the prospects, the salesman
  should try to get information about their nature,
  habits, spending capacity, motives, etc.
• After collecting all such information, he should
  approach the customer in a polite and dignified
  way and introduce himself and his product to the
  prospective customers
• He should not be over-clever or deceptive at any
  stage.
• A counter-sale person should always be careful in
  attending the would be customer.
• He should be careful in his first impression.
• Types of approaching:-
1. The Instant Buddy: People will be more willing to
   buy from someone they like. Salespeople who use
   this approach are warm and friendly, asking
   questions and showing interest in their prospects.
   They try to connect on an emotional level with a
   prospective customer.
1. The Guru: Salespeople who prefer a more logical
   and less emotional approach often set themselves
   the task of becoming experts in anything and
   everything related to their industry. They position
   themselves as problem-solvers, able to answer any
   question and tackle any issue that the prospect lays
   before them.
3. The consultant: This approach combines the 'guru' and
   'buddy' approaches. The salesperson who elects to use the
   consultant approach presents herself as an expert who has
   the customer's best interests in mind. She knows all about
   her company's products and by asking a prospect a few
   questions, she can match him up with the best product for
   his needs.
4. The Networker: Networking can be a big help for any
   salesperson. The dedicated networker takes it to the next
   level, setting up and maintaining a web of friends, co-
   workers, salespeople from other companies, customers and
   former customers, and anyone else he meets. A strong
   enough network will create an ongoing flow of warm leads
   that can provide most or even all of the salesperson's needs
5. The Hard-Seller: Best described as “scare the prospect into
   buying,” the hard sell approach is what gives salespeople
   their bad reputation. Hard selling involves getting someone
   to buy a product even though he doesn't want or need it.
Sales Presentation
• The sales person has to gain the customers attention. For this
  purpose, he should start with sales pitch to present his
  product and describe its characteristics in brief.
• He should understand the attitude of the prospect and match
  with his attitude so that he may be able to hold his attention
  and create interest in the product.
• In selling technique, a sales pitch is a line of talk that attempts
  to persuade someone or something, with a planned sales
  presentation strategy of a product or service designed to
  initiate and close a sale of the product or service.
• A sales pitch is a planned presentation of a product or service
  designed to initiate and close a sale of the same product or
  service. A sales pitch is essentially designed to be either an
  introduction of a product or service to an audience who knows
  nothing about it, or a descriptive expansion of a product or
  service that an audience has already expressed interest in.
Demonstration
• Demonstration is one of the best methods
  of presentation.
• If necessary, the sales person should
  display and demonstrate the working of
  the product.
• He should explain and describe the utility
  of the product in brief through
  demonstration so that the prospect
  realises the need for the product to satisfy
  his wants.
• He should not be in hurry to impress the
  customer and should avoid any
  controversy.
• He may suggest uses of the product and
  may create impulsive urge to possess the
  commodity, by appealing to human
  instinct.
Handling Objections

• Resistance is a wider term than
  objection. Sales resistance is
  purported to those imaginary or
  actual hurdles that make the
  sale of product different.
• The salesmen therefore, are
  compelled to face resistance
  from the buyers.
• It is necessary to evaluate correctly and
  immediately the buying motives in order to
  remove the sales resistance.
• Sales resistance may be of following types:
  i.   The product cannot be sold (product cannot be
       sold on credit).
  ii. Sales objections (objections raised due to
       unclear, impure and inchoate presentation).
  iii. Product related resistance (objection raised on
       account of color, size, shape, price, design,
       technical defects, etc.)
  iv. Buyer related resistance (objection s raised due
       to ignorance toward their necessity).
Closing the Sale
• Closing is a sales term which refers to the
  process of making a sale.
• In sales, it is used more generally to mean
  achievement of the desired outcome, which
  may be an exchange of money or acquiring a
  signature.
• The salesperson should not force the prospect
  to buy but he should let the customer feel
  that he has made the final decision.
• Common Techniques of Sales Closing
• The Assumptive close, also known as the presumptive close: in
  which the salesperson intentionally assumes that the prospect has
  already agreed to buy, and wraps up the sale. "Just pass me your
  credit card and I'll get the paperwork ready."
• The Balance Sheet close, also called the Ben Franklin close, in which
  the salesperson and the prospect build together a pros-and-cons
  list of whether to buy the product, with the salesperson trying to
  ensure the pros list is longer than the cons.
• The Cradle to Grave close, in which the salesperson undercuts
  prospect objections that it is too soon to buy by telling them there
  is never a convenient time in life to make a major purchase, and
  they must therefore do it anyway."
• The Direct close, in which the salesperson simply directly asks the
  prospect to buy. Salespeople are discouraged from using this
  technique unless they are very sure the prospect is ready to
  commit.
• The Indirect close, also known as the question close, in which the
  salesperson moves to the close with an indirect or soft question.
  "How do you feel about these terms" or "how does this agreement
  look to you?
•   The Minor Point close, in which the salesperson deliberately gains agreement
    with the prospect on a minor point, and uses it to assume that the sale is
    closed. "Would the front door look better painted red? No? Okay, then we'll
    leave it the colour it is."
•   The Negative Assumption close, in which the salesperson asks two final
    questions, repeating them until he or she achieves the sale. "Do you have any
    more questions for me?" and "do you see any reason why you wouldn't buy
    this product?" This tactic is often used in job interviews.
•   The Possibility of Loss close, also known as the pressure close, in which the
    salesperson points out that failing to close could result in missed opportunity,
    for example because a product may sell out, or its price rise.
•   The Puppy Dog close, in which the salesperson gives the product to the
    prospect on a trial basis, to test before a sale is agreed upon.
•   The Sales Contest close, in which the salesperson offers the prospect a special
    incentive to close, disarming suspicion with a credible "selfish" justification.
    "How about if I throw in free shipping? If I make this sale, I'll win a trip to
    Spain."
•   The Sharp Angle close, in which the salesperson responds to a prospect
    question with a request to close. "Can you get the system up and running
    within two weeks?" "If I guarantee it, do we have a deal?
Follow-up
• After closing a sale, follow up is must.
• It refers to the activities undertaken to ensure the
  customer that he has taken the right decision of
  buying the product.
• These activities include installation of the
  products, checking and testing its smooth
  performance, maintenance and after-sale service.
• It helps in building long term relationship with
  the customer.
Prospecting
• A salesman has to begin with
  identifying the potential customers.        Sales
• In personal selling it is called            Leads
  prospecting.
                                            Screening
• A prospect is thus a potential
  customer who has the need for           Procedures for
  product, has the purchasing power      Qualifying Leads
  and willingness to buy the product.
• Prospecting is a process whose
  ultimate aim is to build a prospect       Qualified
  base consisting of current                Prospects
  customers and potential customers.
Techniques of Prospecting
o   Cold calling via telephone
o   Door to door cold calling
o   Speaking at conferences
o   Writing articles
o   Trade shows
o   Conferences
o   Reading local newspapers
o   Asking for referrals from existing customers
o   Networking
Popular Prospecting Sources &
    Popular Prospecting Sources &
              Methods
              Methods
Internal Sources                            External Sources
–   Company                                 –   Referrals
    Records
–   Lists and                               –   Introductions
    Directories                             –   Community
–   Advertising                                 Contacts (Centers
    Inquiries                                   of Influence)
–   Telephone                               –   Organizations
    Inquiries
–   ail Inquiries                           –   Non-competing
–   Internet or                                 Salespeople
    World Wide Web   Personal Contact       –   Visible Accounts
                      –   Observation
                      –   Cold Canvassing
                      –   Trade Shows
                      –   Bird Dogs
                          (Spotters)
Significance of Prospecting
Prospecting looks for customers who have the
need and ability to buy our product or service.
Prospecting helps in finding out potential
customers.
Prospecting helps in bringing our lost customers.
Prospecting helps in retaining our current
customers.
Generating sales through prospecting is possible.
Sources of Prospects
ŏ   Referrals
ŏ   Friends & relatives
ŏ   Directories
ŏ   Trade publications
ŏ   Trade shows
ŏ   Telemarketing
ŏ   Ads & sales letters
ŏ   Internet
ŏ   Seminars
ŏ   Old clients
Approaching

Approach
means a               Pre-
                    approach
positive, step by
step proposition
developed by a
firm or a                      Approach
salesperson to
win a favorable
response from         Post-
the prospects .     approach
The Sales Approach
•   Unless it has been necessary to contact the decision maker(s) at the research
    stage, this will normally be the first - and most important - contact at the decision
    making level.
    In the first 2 minutes of the approach, the customer will form an impression of the
    Salesman and his Company that will not easily be changed - be it good or bad!
    The first 2 minutes are therefore crucial. Polite "pleasantries" should of course be
    exchanged, particularly if the local culture expects it. But these should be
    completed quickly and efficiently. It is no time to talk aimlessly about the weather,
    traffic, sport, politics, or to launch into a history of your company. The customer
    has a "problem" and your research should have indicated the likely nature of that
    problem.
    Therefore,

    (a) State the problem.
    (b) Suggest that you might be able to solve it - in terms of BENEFITS.

    (c) Start asking questions when?, what?, how?, why?
Pre-approach
• The planning and preparation done prior to the
  actual contact with the prospect is called pre-
  approach.
• It is one of the stages in sales call preparation in
  which the sales person seeks out additional
  information after the prospecting process is
  completed.
• Allows you to be less mechanical and more
  thoughtful.
• Allows you to anticipate problems and plan ways
  to handle them.
Pre-approach
  Typical information sought is:

(1) The size of the prospect company.
(2) The names and titles of decision makers.
(3) The industry the prospect in and its industry position.
(4) The prospect’s business reputation.
(5) The name of the competitors who currently serve the
   prospect.
(6) The prospect’s current focus. This information, which
   is usually not too difficult to acquire, is enough to
   develop a sales plan that will give that first sales call a
   better chance of success.
Objectives of Pre-approach
• To provide additional information.
• To select the best approach to meet the
  prospects.
• To obtain information for planned presentation
  (personal and business related).
• To avoid serious mistakes.
• To involve the prospect in product demonstration.
• To save time and energy.
• To get referrals.
Post-approach



  Post-        demonstration   displaying
approach
(1) Sales Demonstration
• Demonstration is the act of exhibiting the
  operation or use of a device, machine, process,
  product, or the like, as to a prospective buyer.
• It is an effective communication tool .
• Demonstration have a positive contribution to
  make the selling process.
• It is mutually beneficial to both the prospect and
  the salesperson.
• It makes product evaluation easier for the
  prospect.
• Demonstration can be used strategically to add
  value to the sales.
Benefits of Sales Demonstration
¤   Better communication
¤   Proof of benefits
¤   Feeling of ownership
¤   Infuse sense of confidence
Planning Demonstration
•   Match the demonstration to clients
•   Right selling
•   Sales tools
•   One idea
•   Sensory appeal
•   Telling, showing, involving
•   Rehearsal
•   Creative
Tools for Effective Demonstration
•   Product itself
•   Models
•   Photographs/illustrations
•   Portfolio
•   Reprints
•   Graphs/charts, test results
•   Laptops and demonstration software
•   Audio-visual technology
•   Bound paper presentations
•   Dekho, Dekhane ke paise nahi lagte
(2) Sales Displays
• Display is the act of putting things for view or on view.
  Sales display means "arranging systematically saleable
  goods so as to attract the attention of the customer".
• By sales display, the manufacturer shows the goods or
  services in an attractive manner to catch the eye of
  customers. In fact, display is the silent salesman that
  calls the prospective buyer's attention to the product
  and hopefully makes him to purchase.
• In the past, sales display was the only media for
  exhibiting products and including prospects to buy the
  same. At present, sales display occupies an important
  place in marketing. Sales display acts as advertising at
  the point of purchase.
Objectives of Sales Display
 It presents the product or service to the potential buyers
 It gives an idea about every detail of the product such as
  variety, quality, size, colour, design etc.
 It assists the customer to see and examine the goods
  before they actually buy them.
 Sales display appeals visually to the prospects and
  stimulates them to purchase.
 Sales display reminds the buyers about their need and they
  are attracted to buy.
 It supplements the advertising efforts of the manufacturer.
 Wholesalers and retailers are satisfied by display tactics
  undertaken by the manufacturers they buy the goods
  without hesitation.
Forms of Sales Displays
There are three forms of display:
  1. Interior display
  2. Exterior display
  3. Display at other places
Interior Display
Interior displays or demonstration are arranged inside the shop.
It includes displays on the floor, walls, in the show cases and show
    boxes. Goods should be neatly arranged and displayed inside the
    retail outlet (shop).
In this type of display, proper lighting and colour matching should also
    be made so that overall effect of interior display becomes pleasing
    and attractive.
The principles of cleanliness and orderly arrangement of stock in a
    neat manner are the basic necessities of interior display.
Further, the display should provide the customers and sales personnel
    adequate space to allow movement.
The stock should be kept in such a way that it remains free from dust.
Protection should be given to the displayed items so that they are not
    destroyed. It is also desirable to place related items together.
Exterior Display
  Exterior display is the display of product in the show
  window of the retail outlet. It creates that long
  lasting first impression. It also attracts the attention
  of passers-by as well as prospects and invites them in
  this way to enter the establishment. Window
  dressing, shop front (shop joint) and shop sign (sign
  board) are the major examples for exterior display.
• Shop front :- It is the face of the shop. It should
  clearly indicate the class and variety of products that
  the shop sells. The shop front should be designed in
  such a way that it will remain readily identified from
  among various shops. Therefore it should possess
  some unique features.
• Shop sign:- Like shop front, it is also the face of the shop. It
  should have the name of the shop, the brands it deals with
  and the name of the owner. The sign board be hung in
  such a place where it must be visible to the
  passerby. Either it may be kept at a high place or above the
  shop's entrance as found suitable for clear vision. The sign
  board should possess the characteristics of distinctiveness
  and attractiveness. Both the sign board as well as the shop
  front should be properly lighted.
• Shop Window (Window Dressing):- It is an art of dressing
  windows by attractive display of articles inside the shop
  window. The idea behind window dressing is not only to
  display products to the prospects but also to induce them
  into the store by creating adequate interest among
  them. By creating favourable image or impression upon
  the prospects the window display also creates the desire to
  buy. Thus it creates and maintains the goodwill of the shop
Show Rooms and Show Cases
• Show rooms and show cases are one of the latest types of
  advertising. Most durable and industrial products are
  introduced in the market with the help of these mediums.
• Show rooms are specially designed rooms in which the
  products are displayed. While people pass through such
  show rooms, they get an opportunity to see, touch, handle
  and examine the products at close range. Price tags may be
  attached to the product items. The show room may be
  owner or hired. In general, the show rooms are opened by
  leading companies in important cities and towns. Here the
  purpose is to exhibit the product items to the prospects.
  Sometimes, the show room attendants also get the role of
  salesperson by providing information and clearing the
  doubts /objections of the prospects.
Exhibitions and Trade Fairs
• Exhibitions and trade fairs are meant to display
  product items before the general public,
  demonstrate their uses and merits and create
  market for them. Exhibitions and trade fairs are
  also useful to introduce new products and exhibit
  their uses. Sales literatures, folders, handbills,
  notices are usually distributed to the general
  public and at times free samples are also
  given. At times, government also encourages
  producers to exhibit their products in
  international exhibitions and trade fairs in order
  to expand the export trade.
Various Classes Of Sales Display
1.   Product unit display:
   The product unit displays use merchandise that is identical in size,
   design, colour, shape, use, etc. This type of display is used for bag,
   readymade garments, shirts, etc. Efficient merchandising is of
   interest to both the dealer and the producer. The following would
   probably matter to the dealer:
* Creation of a stocking point for his establishment based on an
   intelligent assessment of profitability and turover.
   * Careful planning of shop floor layout – placing of shelves, displays,
   cabinets, etc-and to ensure maximum speed of the customer traffic
   during peak period, thus avoiding over crowding and bottleneck.
2. Assortment display:
   In this type of display a retailer puts a large range of products for
   display. It can be classified into the following two types:
• Open display(e.g. super bazaar)
• Close display(e.g. shoes ,electronics)
3.Videotape displays:
    This is the latest development in the field of displays. These
    displays make use of technology to "speak" to and show shoppers
    the available merchandise. These pre-recorded audio/video
    devices include "shelf talkers" and "rear screen projection" thus
    adding a new dimension to products which need demonstrations.
4. Life-style displays:
    Using the market segmentation approach life style displays are used
    by retail stores/outlets focusing on life styles of customers. The
    purpose here is to make the retail store appear homely for target
    customer and give him the feeling that he has come to the right
    place to shop.(eg; retail store of Bajaj Two wheelers)
5. Rack displays:
    Clothing and household goods retailers for neatly hanging or
    presenting the products items mainly use this type of display. A
    variety of vertical chrome or steel tubing racks in circular and side-
    wards shapes as well as mobiles are used for displays.
Process of Sales Display Management
Methods Of Sales Plan Presentation
•   Visual Aids
•   Proof Letters
•   Printed Literature
•   Models
•   Video Equipment
Steps in Sales Presentations Plan
•   Approach
•   Presentation
•   Demonstration
•   Negotiation
•   Close
•   Servicing the sale
Salesmanship

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Salesmanship

  • 1. SALESMANSHIP UNIT – 3 By- Shoma Chatterjee
  • 2. MEANING Salesmanship is an art of selling goods and services of the seller to buyers. It is seller-initiated effort that provides prospective buyers with information and motivates or persuades them to make favorable buying decisions concerning the seller’s products or service.
  • 3. DEFINITION The American Marketing Association defined the term ‘salesmanship’ as “ the personal or impersonal process of assisting and/or persuading a prospective customer to buy a commodity or service to act favorable upon an idea that has commercial significance to the seller.
  • 4. Features of Salesmanship Salesmanship is an art Personal service Art of attracting and persuading customers Art of converting desire into necessity Buyer’s confidence Consumer satisfaction Establishment of permanent relations Service for producer, distributor and consumer Mutual benefit Educative process
  • 5. Importance of Salesmanship Important to producers Important to customers Important to salesman Important to government Important to society
  • 6. Scope of Salesmanship • transport • repairing • teaching • painting • banking • legal • medicine • insurance, etc. Salesmanship in its higher levels includes the subject-matter of:- – product knowledge, – knowledge of customers, – training and control of salesman, – organization and management of sales departments, etc.
  • 7. Advantages of Salesmanship Salesmanship helps in preventing the piling up of huge stocks. Salesmanship helps in creating demand for the goods which leads to increase in production. Salesmanship is the best means of two-way communication b/w the company and customer. Increase in sales helps to increase the profits. Increased sales induced business activity which provides more employment and higher income for the community. Consumers are benefitted as salesmen provide them great deal of useful information.
  • 8. Limitations of Salesmanship High cost of personal selling. Salesmanship adopts the methods of pressure selling. Good and competent sales person are scarce.
  • 9.
  • 10. Personal Selling • According to American Marketing Association, “oral presentation is a conversation with one or more prospective customers for the purpose of making sales.” • It is most important of all the market efforts of an enterprise because through personal selling consumers are encouraged more.
  • 11. Characteristics of Personal Selling It is the method of direct selling . It involves oral communication between buyer and seller. In personal selling, the seller wants to convince the buyers to sell his product. It involve the sale of goods and services personally. It is most effective tool of increasing the sales. It helps in providing many important information to the enterprise regarding the market. It is essential for the survival of business.
  • 12. Nature Or Functions Of Personal Selling Making sales Advertise the new product Service to customers Executive functions Records of the sales Collect statistics
  • 13. Importance of Personal Selling • Helpful in selling • Demonstrating the product • Helpful in removing the doubts & confusions of customers • Helpful in communication • Knowledge of prospective buyers • Important from buyer’s point of view • Important to the society
  • 14. Limitations of Personal Selling • Increase in the cost of sales • Difficulty of reporting at right time • Lack of efficient salesman
  • 15. Types Of Personal Selling • Selling for retailer or consumer salesmanship • Selling for wholesaler or merchant salesmanship • Selling for manufacturers
  • 16. Types Of Sales Executives 1. Order getting salesman Manufacturers order getting salesmen: these sales men deal with industrial products and raw material. Their main function is to receive orders in bulk quantity for their manufacturers. Wholesale order getting salesmen: the salesmen of this nature, receive orders from the retailers by strolling in the markets for wholesalers. Retailer order getting salesmen: these salesmen receive order from consumers by visiting door-to-door and convincing them for the retailers.
  • 17. 2. Order taking salesman: These salesmen receive bulk orders and sometimes, receive the payment for products immediately delivered to the buyers. These salesmen work for manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers too. 3. Supporting salesman: Such salesmen neither receive orders for any person nor do the sale. They help the manufacturer in order to increase the sale in the common course of business in their respective areas. Missionary salesmen : also known as pioneer salesmen. They act as communication media amid the manufacturers, wholesalers and the retailers. He creates the demand for the products and thus, enhances the popularity of the institution. Salesmen of mechanical expertise : these salesmen generally are highly qualified engineers or expert mechanics. they are sent to those consumers / buyers who face any problem, difficulty or grievance. They restore the confidence of the customers on product and provide them with satisfaction by solving the problem.
  • 18. Qualities Of Sales Executives Ability to define position’s exact functions and duties in relation to the goals the company should expect to attain. Ability to select and train capable subordinates and willingness to delegate sufficient authority to enable them to carry out assigned tasks with minimum supervision. Ability to utilize time efficiently. Ability to allocate sufficient time for thinking and planning. Ability to exercise skilled leadership.
  • 19.
  • 20. Theories of Personal Selling  AIDAS Theory Of Selling  Right Set Of Circumstances  Buying Formula Theory  Behavioral Equation Theory
  • 21. AIDAS Theory of Selling A ATTRACT ATTENTION I SUSTAIN INTEREST D CREATE DESIRE A INDUCTING ACTION S BUILDING SATISFACTION
  • 22. • ATTRACT ATTENTION • SUSTAIN INTEREST • CREATE DESIRE • INDUCTING ACTION (clarify objections and close the sale) • BUILDING SATISFACTION (activities after the sale)
  • 23. Right Set Of Circumstances • This theory can be summarized as “ everything was right for that sale”. • Also called “Situation Response theory”. • In particular circumstances we respond in a particular way . • Salesperson needs to present PROPER STIMULI or APPEALS so that desired response is resulted • Seller oriented Theory • External Factors vis-à-vis Internal Factors • Focus on the external factors at the expense of Internal Factors
  • 24. • This theory sometimes is also called “Situation Response theory”, had its psychological origin in experiments with animals and holds that the particular circumstances prevailing in a given selling situation cause the prospect to responding a predictable way. • If the sales person succeeds in securing the attention and gaining the interest of the prospect, and if the salesperson presents the proper stimuli or appeals, the desired response will result.
  • 25. • Furthermore the more skilled the salesperson is in handling the set of circumstances, the more predictable is the response. The set of circumstances includes factors external and internal to the prospect. Example, Suppose a salesperson sales to the prospect, “Let’s go out for lunch”. The salesperson and the remarks are the external factors. But at least 4 factors internal to the prospect affect the response. These are the presence or the absence of desires (1)First to go out for lunch (2)To have it now (3)To go out (4)To go out with salesperson
  • 26. • Proponents of this theory tend to stress external factors and at the expense of internal factors. They seek selling appeals that evoke desired responses. Sales personnel who try to apply the theory experience difficulty traceable to internal factors in many selling situations, but the internal factors are not readily manipulated. This is a seller oriented theory: it stresses the importance of the salesperson controlling the situation, does not handle the problem of influencing the factors internal to the prospect, and fails to assign appropriate weight to the response side of the situation response interaction.
  • 27. Buying Formula Theory • Buying Formula Theory Emphasizes the Buyer’s side of the Buyer Seller Dyad Buyer’s needs or problems receive the major attention and the salesperson’s role is to find solution Buying formula is a schematic representation of a group of responses arranged in a psychological sequence Emphasizes the Prospect’s responses
  • 28. Buying Formula Theory • Simplest Model: Need (Problem) – Solution – Purchase Outcome of a purchase affects the chance that a continuing relationship will develop between buyer and seller Need (Problem) – Solution – Purchase- Satisfaction
  • 29. • Need is always satisfied by a solution in terms of product or services accompanied by respective Trade or Brand Name Need (Problem) – Solution – Product or Service/ Trade or Brand Name - Purchase- Satisfaction • To ensure purchase, the product or service & the Trade Name must be considered adequate and the buyer must experience feeling of anticipated satisfaction
  • 30. • Emphasis should be placed depending upon kind of circumstance • Need or Problem should be emphasized if Prospect does not feel a need • Association between need and Product must be emphasized if Prospect does not connect it • Association between Brand and Product to be emphasized if Prospect fails to connect it • In case of competition, emphasis should be on developing the adequacy of the brand name and pleasant feelings around it.
  • 31. Product Need Of Purchase Satisfaction Problem Brand Adequence Product Need Of Purchase Satisfaction Problem Brand Pleasant Feeling
  • 32. Behavioral Equation Theory • Buying Behavior in terms of the purchasing process viewed as phases of learning process . Four Essential Elements: • Drives: Strong Internal Stimuli that impel the buyer’s action – Innate Drives – Learned Drives Eg. : Innate drive –you are hungry Learned drive – you want to have burger
  • 33. • Cues: Stimuli that will determine when buyer will respond – Triggering Cues – Non Triggering Cues • (i)Triggering cue – activates decision process for a given product and evokes you to buy a product. For example : you are hungry and want to have burger • (ii) Non – triggering cue – influences the decision process but not activate. It can be of two types for the product which helps to make opinion for decision process and the information which you get from advertisements, sales promotion etc. For example :You believe McDonalds provides the cheap and the best burger with quickest service time
  • 34. • Specific product / information – also functions as triggering cue. For example special offers/discounts on cold drink and French fries with the burger. • Response: What buyer does Example buyer can purchase or not • Reinforcement: Event that strengthens the buyer’s tendency to make a particular response Example: convenience, time saving and money factor • Behavioral Equation: B = P*D*K*V B – Response or purchase of brand P – Predisposition D - Present drive level K - Incentive Potential V – Intensity of all cues
  • 35. B = P * D * K * V Response Force of Drive level Value of the Intensity of purchasing habit or product to all ques motivation provide satisfaction
  • 36.
  • 37. Selling Process  Pre-sale preparation  Prospecting and canvassing  Approaching  Sales presentation  Demonstration  Handling objections  Closing the sale  Follow-up
  • 38.
  • 39. Pre-sale Preparation • Presales is a process or a set of activities normally carried out before a customer is acquired, though sometimes presales also extends into the period the product or service is delivered to the customer. • It is the first step in personal selling. They must be properly selected, trained, and motivated for the job. • They must be fully familiar with the producer, the product, the market and the selling techniques. • Both the product knowledge and the company knowledge must be aware of.
  • 40. Prospecting and Canvassing • It refers to locating the potential buyers for the product and satisfying buyers about the product and screen them to make sure that their sales efforts will not go waste. • A salesman should examine the need of the buyers and their capacity to buy the product. • He should always remember that every one cannot be a prospect. • While "Selling" is the art of convincing someone to make a purchase, "Prospecting" is really the science of setting aside or disqualifying suspects who don't fit the right profile so your sales process can focus on the most profitable candidates.
  • 41. Approaching • Before calling on the prospects, the salesman should try to get information about their nature, habits, spending capacity, motives, etc. • After collecting all such information, he should approach the customer in a polite and dignified way and introduce himself and his product to the prospective customers • He should not be over-clever or deceptive at any stage. • A counter-sale person should always be careful in attending the would be customer. • He should be careful in his first impression.
  • 42. • Types of approaching:- 1. The Instant Buddy: People will be more willing to buy from someone they like. Salespeople who use this approach are warm and friendly, asking questions and showing interest in their prospects. They try to connect on an emotional level with a prospective customer. 1. The Guru: Salespeople who prefer a more logical and less emotional approach often set themselves the task of becoming experts in anything and everything related to their industry. They position themselves as problem-solvers, able to answer any question and tackle any issue that the prospect lays before them.
  • 43. 3. The consultant: This approach combines the 'guru' and 'buddy' approaches. The salesperson who elects to use the consultant approach presents herself as an expert who has the customer's best interests in mind. She knows all about her company's products and by asking a prospect a few questions, she can match him up with the best product for his needs. 4. The Networker: Networking can be a big help for any salesperson. The dedicated networker takes it to the next level, setting up and maintaining a web of friends, co- workers, salespeople from other companies, customers and former customers, and anyone else he meets. A strong enough network will create an ongoing flow of warm leads that can provide most or even all of the salesperson's needs 5. The Hard-Seller: Best described as “scare the prospect into buying,” the hard sell approach is what gives salespeople their bad reputation. Hard selling involves getting someone to buy a product even though he doesn't want or need it.
  • 45. • The sales person has to gain the customers attention. For this purpose, he should start with sales pitch to present his product and describe its characteristics in brief. • He should understand the attitude of the prospect and match with his attitude so that he may be able to hold his attention and create interest in the product. • In selling technique, a sales pitch is a line of talk that attempts to persuade someone or something, with a planned sales presentation strategy of a product or service designed to initiate and close a sale of the product or service. • A sales pitch is a planned presentation of a product or service designed to initiate and close a sale of the same product or service. A sales pitch is essentially designed to be either an introduction of a product or service to an audience who knows nothing about it, or a descriptive expansion of a product or service that an audience has already expressed interest in.
  • 46. Demonstration • Demonstration is one of the best methods of presentation. • If necessary, the sales person should display and demonstrate the working of the product. • He should explain and describe the utility of the product in brief through demonstration so that the prospect realises the need for the product to satisfy his wants. • He should not be in hurry to impress the customer and should avoid any controversy. • He may suggest uses of the product and may create impulsive urge to possess the commodity, by appealing to human instinct.
  • 47. Handling Objections • Resistance is a wider term than objection. Sales resistance is purported to those imaginary or actual hurdles that make the sale of product different. • The salesmen therefore, are compelled to face resistance from the buyers.
  • 48. • It is necessary to evaluate correctly and immediately the buying motives in order to remove the sales resistance. • Sales resistance may be of following types: i. The product cannot be sold (product cannot be sold on credit). ii. Sales objections (objections raised due to unclear, impure and inchoate presentation). iii. Product related resistance (objection raised on account of color, size, shape, price, design, technical defects, etc.) iv. Buyer related resistance (objection s raised due to ignorance toward their necessity).
  • 49. Closing the Sale • Closing is a sales term which refers to the process of making a sale. • In sales, it is used more generally to mean achievement of the desired outcome, which may be an exchange of money or acquiring a signature. • The salesperson should not force the prospect to buy but he should let the customer feel that he has made the final decision.
  • 50. • Common Techniques of Sales Closing • The Assumptive close, also known as the presumptive close: in which the salesperson intentionally assumes that the prospect has already agreed to buy, and wraps up the sale. "Just pass me your credit card and I'll get the paperwork ready." • The Balance Sheet close, also called the Ben Franklin close, in which the salesperson and the prospect build together a pros-and-cons list of whether to buy the product, with the salesperson trying to ensure the pros list is longer than the cons. • The Cradle to Grave close, in which the salesperson undercuts prospect objections that it is too soon to buy by telling them there is never a convenient time in life to make a major purchase, and they must therefore do it anyway." • The Direct close, in which the salesperson simply directly asks the prospect to buy. Salespeople are discouraged from using this technique unless they are very sure the prospect is ready to commit. • The Indirect close, also known as the question close, in which the salesperson moves to the close with an indirect or soft question. "How do you feel about these terms" or "how does this agreement look to you?
  • 51. The Minor Point close, in which the salesperson deliberately gains agreement with the prospect on a minor point, and uses it to assume that the sale is closed. "Would the front door look better painted red? No? Okay, then we'll leave it the colour it is." • The Negative Assumption close, in which the salesperson asks two final questions, repeating them until he or she achieves the sale. "Do you have any more questions for me?" and "do you see any reason why you wouldn't buy this product?" This tactic is often used in job interviews. • The Possibility of Loss close, also known as the pressure close, in which the salesperson points out that failing to close could result in missed opportunity, for example because a product may sell out, or its price rise. • The Puppy Dog close, in which the salesperson gives the product to the prospect on a trial basis, to test before a sale is agreed upon. • The Sales Contest close, in which the salesperson offers the prospect a special incentive to close, disarming suspicion with a credible "selfish" justification. "How about if I throw in free shipping? If I make this sale, I'll win a trip to Spain." • The Sharp Angle close, in which the salesperson responds to a prospect question with a request to close. "Can you get the system up and running within two weeks?" "If I guarantee it, do we have a deal?
  • 52. Follow-up • After closing a sale, follow up is must. • It refers to the activities undertaken to ensure the customer that he has taken the right decision of buying the product. • These activities include installation of the products, checking and testing its smooth performance, maintenance and after-sale service. • It helps in building long term relationship with the customer.
  • 53.
  • 54. Prospecting • A salesman has to begin with identifying the potential customers. Sales • In personal selling it is called Leads prospecting. Screening • A prospect is thus a potential customer who has the need for Procedures for product, has the purchasing power Qualifying Leads and willingness to buy the product. • Prospecting is a process whose ultimate aim is to build a prospect Qualified base consisting of current Prospects customers and potential customers.
  • 55. Techniques of Prospecting o Cold calling via telephone o Door to door cold calling o Speaking at conferences o Writing articles o Trade shows o Conferences o Reading local newspapers o Asking for referrals from existing customers o Networking
  • 56. Popular Prospecting Sources & Popular Prospecting Sources & Methods Methods Internal Sources External Sources – Company – Referrals Records – Lists and – Introductions Directories – Community – Advertising Contacts (Centers Inquiries of Influence) – Telephone – Organizations Inquiries – ail Inquiries – Non-competing – Internet or Salespeople World Wide Web Personal Contact – Visible Accounts – Observation – Cold Canvassing – Trade Shows – Bird Dogs (Spotters)
  • 57. Significance of Prospecting Prospecting looks for customers who have the need and ability to buy our product or service. Prospecting helps in finding out potential customers. Prospecting helps in bringing our lost customers. Prospecting helps in retaining our current customers. Generating sales through prospecting is possible.
  • 58. Sources of Prospects ŏ Referrals ŏ Friends & relatives ŏ Directories ŏ Trade publications ŏ Trade shows ŏ Telemarketing ŏ Ads & sales letters ŏ Internet ŏ Seminars ŏ Old clients
  • 59. Approaching Approach means a Pre- approach positive, step by step proposition developed by a firm or a Approach salesperson to win a favorable response from Post- the prospects . approach
  • 60. The Sales Approach • Unless it has been necessary to contact the decision maker(s) at the research stage, this will normally be the first - and most important - contact at the decision making level. In the first 2 minutes of the approach, the customer will form an impression of the Salesman and his Company that will not easily be changed - be it good or bad! The first 2 minutes are therefore crucial. Polite "pleasantries" should of course be exchanged, particularly if the local culture expects it. But these should be completed quickly and efficiently. It is no time to talk aimlessly about the weather, traffic, sport, politics, or to launch into a history of your company. The customer has a "problem" and your research should have indicated the likely nature of that problem. Therefore, (a) State the problem. (b) Suggest that you might be able to solve it - in terms of BENEFITS. (c) Start asking questions when?, what?, how?, why?
  • 61. Pre-approach • The planning and preparation done prior to the actual contact with the prospect is called pre- approach. • It is one of the stages in sales call preparation in which the sales person seeks out additional information after the prospecting process is completed. • Allows you to be less mechanical and more thoughtful. • Allows you to anticipate problems and plan ways to handle them.
  • 62. Pre-approach Typical information sought is: (1) The size of the prospect company. (2) The names and titles of decision makers. (3) The industry the prospect in and its industry position. (4) The prospect’s business reputation. (5) The name of the competitors who currently serve the prospect. (6) The prospect’s current focus. This information, which is usually not too difficult to acquire, is enough to develop a sales plan that will give that first sales call a better chance of success.
  • 63. Objectives of Pre-approach • To provide additional information. • To select the best approach to meet the prospects. • To obtain information for planned presentation (personal and business related). • To avoid serious mistakes. • To involve the prospect in product demonstration. • To save time and energy. • To get referrals.
  • 64. Post-approach Post- demonstration displaying approach
  • 65. (1) Sales Demonstration • Demonstration is the act of exhibiting the operation or use of a device, machine, process, product, or the like, as to a prospective buyer. • It is an effective communication tool . • Demonstration have a positive contribution to make the selling process. • It is mutually beneficial to both the prospect and the salesperson. • It makes product evaluation easier for the prospect. • Demonstration can be used strategically to add value to the sales.
  • 66. Benefits of Sales Demonstration ¤ Better communication ¤ Proof of benefits ¤ Feeling of ownership ¤ Infuse sense of confidence
  • 67. Planning Demonstration • Match the demonstration to clients • Right selling • Sales tools • One idea • Sensory appeal • Telling, showing, involving • Rehearsal • Creative
  • 68. Tools for Effective Demonstration • Product itself • Models • Photographs/illustrations • Portfolio • Reprints • Graphs/charts, test results • Laptops and demonstration software • Audio-visual technology • Bound paper presentations • Dekho, Dekhane ke paise nahi lagte
  • 69. (2) Sales Displays • Display is the act of putting things for view or on view. Sales display means "arranging systematically saleable goods so as to attract the attention of the customer". • By sales display, the manufacturer shows the goods or services in an attractive manner to catch the eye of customers. In fact, display is the silent salesman that calls the prospective buyer's attention to the product and hopefully makes him to purchase. • In the past, sales display was the only media for exhibiting products and including prospects to buy the same. At present, sales display occupies an important place in marketing. Sales display acts as advertising at the point of purchase.
  • 70. Objectives of Sales Display  It presents the product or service to the potential buyers  It gives an idea about every detail of the product such as variety, quality, size, colour, design etc.  It assists the customer to see and examine the goods before they actually buy them.  Sales display appeals visually to the prospects and stimulates them to purchase.  Sales display reminds the buyers about their need and they are attracted to buy.  It supplements the advertising efforts of the manufacturer.  Wholesalers and retailers are satisfied by display tactics undertaken by the manufacturers they buy the goods without hesitation.
  • 71. Forms of Sales Displays There are three forms of display: 1. Interior display 2. Exterior display 3. Display at other places
  • 72. Interior Display Interior displays or demonstration are arranged inside the shop. It includes displays on the floor, walls, in the show cases and show boxes. Goods should be neatly arranged and displayed inside the retail outlet (shop). In this type of display, proper lighting and colour matching should also be made so that overall effect of interior display becomes pleasing and attractive. The principles of cleanliness and orderly arrangement of stock in a neat manner are the basic necessities of interior display. Further, the display should provide the customers and sales personnel adequate space to allow movement. The stock should be kept in such a way that it remains free from dust. Protection should be given to the displayed items so that they are not destroyed. It is also desirable to place related items together.
  • 73. Exterior Display Exterior display is the display of product in the show window of the retail outlet. It creates that long lasting first impression. It also attracts the attention of passers-by as well as prospects and invites them in this way to enter the establishment. Window dressing, shop front (shop joint) and shop sign (sign board) are the major examples for exterior display. • Shop front :- It is the face of the shop. It should clearly indicate the class and variety of products that the shop sells. The shop front should be designed in such a way that it will remain readily identified from among various shops. Therefore it should possess some unique features.
  • 74. • Shop sign:- Like shop front, it is also the face of the shop. It should have the name of the shop, the brands it deals with and the name of the owner. The sign board be hung in such a place where it must be visible to the passerby. Either it may be kept at a high place or above the shop's entrance as found suitable for clear vision. The sign board should possess the characteristics of distinctiveness and attractiveness. Both the sign board as well as the shop front should be properly lighted. • Shop Window (Window Dressing):- It is an art of dressing windows by attractive display of articles inside the shop window. The idea behind window dressing is not only to display products to the prospects but also to induce them into the store by creating adequate interest among them. By creating favourable image or impression upon the prospects the window display also creates the desire to buy. Thus it creates and maintains the goodwill of the shop
  • 75. Show Rooms and Show Cases • Show rooms and show cases are one of the latest types of advertising. Most durable and industrial products are introduced in the market with the help of these mediums. • Show rooms are specially designed rooms in which the products are displayed. While people pass through such show rooms, they get an opportunity to see, touch, handle and examine the products at close range. Price tags may be attached to the product items. The show room may be owner or hired. In general, the show rooms are opened by leading companies in important cities and towns. Here the purpose is to exhibit the product items to the prospects. Sometimes, the show room attendants also get the role of salesperson by providing information and clearing the doubts /objections of the prospects.
  • 76. Exhibitions and Trade Fairs • Exhibitions and trade fairs are meant to display product items before the general public, demonstrate their uses and merits and create market for them. Exhibitions and trade fairs are also useful to introduce new products and exhibit their uses. Sales literatures, folders, handbills, notices are usually distributed to the general public and at times free samples are also given. At times, government also encourages producers to exhibit their products in international exhibitions and trade fairs in order to expand the export trade.
  • 77. Various Classes Of Sales Display 1. Product unit display: The product unit displays use merchandise that is identical in size, design, colour, shape, use, etc. This type of display is used for bag, readymade garments, shirts, etc. Efficient merchandising is of interest to both the dealer and the producer. The following would probably matter to the dealer: * Creation of a stocking point for his establishment based on an intelligent assessment of profitability and turover. * Careful planning of shop floor layout – placing of shelves, displays, cabinets, etc-and to ensure maximum speed of the customer traffic during peak period, thus avoiding over crowding and bottleneck. 2. Assortment display: In this type of display a retailer puts a large range of products for display. It can be classified into the following two types: • Open display(e.g. super bazaar) • Close display(e.g. shoes ,electronics)
  • 78. 3.Videotape displays: This is the latest development in the field of displays. These displays make use of technology to "speak" to and show shoppers the available merchandise. These pre-recorded audio/video devices include "shelf talkers" and "rear screen projection" thus adding a new dimension to products which need demonstrations. 4. Life-style displays: Using the market segmentation approach life style displays are used by retail stores/outlets focusing on life styles of customers. The purpose here is to make the retail store appear homely for target customer and give him the feeling that he has come to the right place to shop.(eg; retail store of Bajaj Two wheelers) 5. Rack displays: Clothing and household goods retailers for neatly hanging or presenting the products items mainly use this type of display. A variety of vertical chrome or steel tubing racks in circular and side- wards shapes as well as mobiles are used for displays.
  • 79. Process of Sales Display Management
  • 80. Methods Of Sales Plan Presentation • Visual Aids • Proof Letters • Printed Literature • Models • Video Equipment
  • 81. Steps in Sales Presentations Plan • Approach • Presentation • Demonstration • Negotiation • Close • Servicing the sale