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Q4 - Lesson 1
Illustrating Hypothesis
Testing
Emily O. Camat
Subject Teacher
1. illustrates: (a) null hypothesis; (b)
alternative hypothesis; (c) level of
significance; (d) rejection region;
and (e) types of errors in hypothesis
testing. (M11/12SP-IVa-1)
MELCs
So, have you ever read a short
story about hypothesis testing? It
might sound like a snoozefest, but
hear me out. Picture this: a group
of scientists are on an expedition
in search of a rare animal deep in
the jungle. They come across two
different species that look almost
identical, and now they need to
figure out if they're actually the
Reading Enhancement
Enter hypothesis testing. The
scientists develop their
hypotheses, collect data, and
perform statistical analysis to
determine whether their beliefs
about these animals can be
supported by evidence. It's
basically like solving a mystery
Reading Enhancement
Plus, it's relevant to our
everyday lives - we're constantly
making predictions and
assumptions that need to be
tested in order to truly
understand the world around us.
So go ahead and give that short
story about hypothesis testing a
Reading Enhancement
Activity 1: Identify Me!
Directions: Identify the following illustration
whether it is non-directional or directional, two-
tailed or one tailed by checking the appropriate
box.
Activity 1: Identify Me!
Activity 1: Identify Me!
Activity 2: What mistakes do people make?
Directions: Read the following statements and
identify the phrase/s that makes the
statement wrong.
1. Bryan thinks that he is a six-footer. His actual
height is 156 cm.
2. On a moonlit night, a young man declares that
there are two moons.
3. Mark says “I am virtuous!” In the next
moment, he finds himself in jail.
4. Thousands of years ago, Ptolemy declared that
the earth is flat.
Activity 2: What mistakes do people make?
Directions: Read the following statements and
identify the phrase/s that makes the
statement wrong.
5. On a beachfront, a signage reads, “No littering of
plastic wrappers, empty bottles and cans.” A few yards
away, environmentalists are picking up the rubbish left
behind by the picnic lovers.
6. The doctor says “Congratulations. You are pregnant”
to the man with a stomach ache.
7. Angela says “I don’t have any allergy in seafood”. In
the next moment, she finds herself itching all over her
body.
Activity 2: What mistakes do people make?
Directions: Read the following statements and
identify the phrase/s that makes the
statement wrong.
8. Today is not my friend’s birthday but
I will wish her happy birthday.
9. Back in the day, scientist believes that
Earth is at the center of the universe.
10. Hannah said to her friend “People’s
intelligence is measured through their
proficiency in English”.
- is a decision-making process for evaluating
claims about a population based on the
characteristics of a sample purportedly coming
from the population. We get a random sample
from the population, collect data from the
sample, and use this data to make a decision as
to whether the hypothesis is acceptable or not.
Hypothesis Testing
Null hypothesis, denoted by H0 , is a
statement that there is no difference
between two parameters It can be written
as 𝐻0: 𝜇1 = 𝜇2.
Alternative hypothesis, denoted by or Ha,
is a statement that there is a difference two
between a parameters. It can be written as
𝐻1: 𝜇1 ≠ 𝜇2 , 𝐻1: 𝜇1 < 𝜇2, or 𝐻1: 𝜇1 > 𝜇2
Two types of hypothesis
Example 1: The average TV
viewing time of all six-year old
children is 4 hours daily.
Answer:
In words, the hypotheses are:
H0 : The average TV viewing time of six-year old children
is 4 hours.
H1 or Ha: The average TV viewing time of six-year old
children is less than 4 hours.
In symbols, we write:
H0: 𝜇 = 4
or Ha: 𝜇 <4
Example 2: A college librarian claims
that 25 story books on the average are
borrowed daily.
Answer:
H0: The average story books borrowed in the
library is 25.
Ha: The average story books borrowed in the
library is more than 25.
In symbols, we write:
H0: 𝜇=25
Ha: 𝜇 >25
When the alternative hypothesis utilizes the
< or the > symbol, the test is said to be
directional. A directional test may either be left-
tailed or right-tailed. In problems that involve
hypothesis testing, there are words like greater,
efficient, improves, effective, increases and so on
that suggest a right-tailed direction in the
formulation of the alternative hypothesis. Words
like decrease, less than, smaller, and so on
suggest a left-tailed direction.
Example 3: The inventor of a new kind of
light bulb claims that all such bulbs last
as long as 3000 hours.
Answer:
In words, the hypotheses are:
H0: The new kind of light bulb will last as long as 3000
hours.
H1 or Ha: The new kind of light bulb will not last as
long as 3000 hours.
In symbols, we write:
H0: 𝜇 = 3000
H1 or Ha: 𝜇 ≠ 3000
When the alternative hypothesis utilizes
the ≠ symbol, the test is said to be non-
directional. A non-directional test is also
called a two-tailed test.
Non-directional (two-tailed)
The probability is found on
both tails of the distribution.
Directional
(one-tailed, left-tailed)
The probability is found at
the left tail of the
distribution.
Directional
(one-tailed, right-
tailed)
The probability is found
at the right tail
of the distribution.
Example 4: The owner of a factory that sells a
particular bottled water claims that the average
capacity of a bottle of their product is 200 ml. Is the
claim true?
Solution:
In words, the hypotheses are:
H0 : The bottled water contains 200ml per bottle.
H1 or Ha: The bottled water does not contain 250 ml per
bottle.
In symbols, the hypotheses are:
H0 : 𝜇 = 50
H1 or Ha : 𝜇 ≠ 50
Example 5. A rice farmer believes that using
organic fertilizer on his plants will yield greater
income. His average income from the past was
Php200,000 per year. State the hypothesis in
symbols.
Solution:
In words, the hypotheses are:
H0: The rice farmer yields an income of Php200,000.
Ha: The rice farmer yields an income greater than
Php200,000.
In symbols, the hypotheses are:
H0: 𝜇=200,000
or Ha: 𝜇 >200,000
Table 1. Four Possible Outcomes in Decision-Making
Example 6: Understanding Errors
A. Maria insists that she is 30 years old when, in
fact, she is 35 years old. What error is Maria
committing?
Ans: Maria is rejecting the truth. She
is committing a Type I error.
Example 6: Understanding Errors
B. A man plans to go hunting the Philippine
monkey-eating eagle believing that it is a proof
of his mettle. What type of error is this?
Ans : Hunting the Philippine
monkey-eating eagle is prohibited.
Thus, it is not a good sport. It is a
Type II error.
In decisions that we make, we form conclusions and
these conclusions are the bases of our actions. The
probability of committing a Type I error is denoted by
the Greek letter 𝛼(alpha) while the probability of
committing Type II error is denoted by 𝛽(beta).
The following table shows the probability with which decisions occur
Table 2. Types of Errors
Table 3. Level of Significance
Level of Significance (denoted as alpha or 𝛼) is a measure of
the strength of the evidence that must be present in a sample
before rejecting the null hypothesis and conclude that the
effect is statistically significant. It is the probability of rejecting
the null hypothesis when it is true. The commonly used level
of significance are 1%, 5% and 10%. In table 3, it shows the
confidence level for every level of significance
that are commonly used in researches.
 Under the normal curve, the rejection region refers to the region
where the value of the test statistic lies for which we will reject the null
hypothesis. This region is also called critical region. So, if your
computed statistic is found in the rejection region, then you reject 𝐻0. If
it is found outside the rejection region you accept 𝐻0.
Graphically, we can show the decision errors under normal curve.
In figure 4, it shows the line that separates the
rejection region from the nonrejection region (1- 𝛼).
This line passes through the confidence coefficients,
which also called critical values. The critical values
can be obtained from the critical values table of the
test statistic. For example, for a 95% confidence level
if the test statistic is a z and it is a non-directional
test, it can be determined by having this equation 0.95
/ 2 = 0.4750 (expressed up to four decimal places so
that we can identify an area in the normal curve table
as close as possible to this value).
In the z-table, the area 0.4750 corresponds to z = 1.96 so the critical
values for a non directional test or two-tailed are -1.96 and +1.96. This
can be written as za/2 = ± 1.96. When the confidence level is 95% and
the test statistic is a z and it is a directional test or one-tailed. The
critical values can be determined by changing 95% to 0.9500
(expressed up to four decimal places so that we can identify an area in
the normal curve table as close as possible to this value).
In the z-table, there are two areas close to this
value: 0.9495 that corresponds to z = 1.64 and
0.9505 that corresponds to z =1.65. Then we get
the average of the zvalues. This results to 1.645. In
practice, we use the z-values of -1.65 for left-tailed
and +1.65 for right tailed
Q4-1-Illustrating-Hypothesis-Testing.pptx

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Q4-1-Illustrating-Hypothesis-Testing.pptx

  • 1. Q4 - Lesson 1 Illustrating Hypothesis Testing Emily O. Camat Subject Teacher
  • 2. 1. illustrates: (a) null hypothesis; (b) alternative hypothesis; (c) level of significance; (d) rejection region; and (e) types of errors in hypothesis testing. (M11/12SP-IVa-1) MELCs
  • 3. So, have you ever read a short story about hypothesis testing? It might sound like a snoozefest, but hear me out. Picture this: a group of scientists are on an expedition in search of a rare animal deep in the jungle. They come across two different species that look almost identical, and now they need to figure out if they're actually the Reading Enhancement
  • 4. Enter hypothesis testing. The scientists develop their hypotheses, collect data, and perform statistical analysis to determine whether their beliefs about these animals can be supported by evidence. It's basically like solving a mystery Reading Enhancement
  • 5. Plus, it's relevant to our everyday lives - we're constantly making predictions and assumptions that need to be tested in order to truly understand the world around us. So go ahead and give that short story about hypothesis testing a Reading Enhancement
  • 6. Activity 1: Identify Me! Directions: Identify the following illustration whether it is non-directional or directional, two- tailed or one tailed by checking the appropriate box.
  • 9. Activity 2: What mistakes do people make? Directions: Read the following statements and identify the phrase/s that makes the statement wrong. 1. Bryan thinks that he is a six-footer. His actual height is 156 cm. 2. On a moonlit night, a young man declares that there are two moons. 3. Mark says “I am virtuous!” In the next moment, he finds himself in jail. 4. Thousands of years ago, Ptolemy declared that the earth is flat.
  • 10. Activity 2: What mistakes do people make? Directions: Read the following statements and identify the phrase/s that makes the statement wrong. 5. On a beachfront, a signage reads, “No littering of plastic wrappers, empty bottles and cans.” A few yards away, environmentalists are picking up the rubbish left behind by the picnic lovers. 6. The doctor says “Congratulations. You are pregnant” to the man with a stomach ache. 7. Angela says “I don’t have any allergy in seafood”. In the next moment, she finds herself itching all over her body.
  • 11. Activity 2: What mistakes do people make? Directions: Read the following statements and identify the phrase/s that makes the statement wrong. 8. Today is not my friend’s birthday but I will wish her happy birthday. 9. Back in the day, scientist believes that Earth is at the center of the universe. 10. Hannah said to her friend “People’s intelligence is measured through their proficiency in English”.
  • 12. - is a decision-making process for evaluating claims about a population based on the characteristics of a sample purportedly coming from the population. We get a random sample from the population, collect data from the sample, and use this data to make a decision as to whether the hypothesis is acceptable or not. Hypothesis Testing
  • 13. Null hypothesis, denoted by H0 , is a statement that there is no difference between two parameters It can be written as 𝐻0: 𝜇1 = 𝜇2. Alternative hypothesis, denoted by or Ha, is a statement that there is a difference two between a parameters. It can be written as 𝐻1: 𝜇1 ≠ 𝜇2 , 𝐻1: 𝜇1 < 𝜇2, or 𝐻1: 𝜇1 > 𝜇2 Two types of hypothesis
  • 14. Example 1: The average TV viewing time of all six-year old children is 4 hours daily. Answer: In words, the hypotheses are: H0 : The average TV viewing time of six-year old children is 4 hours. H1 or Ha: The average TV viewing time of six-year old children is less than 4 hours. In symbols, we write: H0: 𝜇 = 4 or Ha: 𝜇 <4
  • 15. Example 2: A college librarian claims that 25 story books on the average are borrowed daily. Answer: H0: The average story books borrowed in the library is 25. Ha: The average story books borrowed in the library is more than 25. In symbols, we write: H0: 𝜇=25 Ha: 𝜇 >25
  • 16. When the alternative hypothesis utilizes the < or the > symbol, the test is said to be directional. A directional test may either be left- tailed or right-tailed. In problems that involve hypothesis testing, there are words like greater, efficient, improves, effective, increases and so on that suggest a right-tailed direction in the formulation of the alternative hypothesis. Words like decrease, less than, smaller, and so on suggest a left-tailed direction.
  • 17. Example 3: The inventor of a new kind of light bulb claims that all such bulbs last as long as 3000 hours. Answer: In words, the hypotheses are: H0: The new kind of light bulb will last as long as 3000 hours. H1 or Ha: The new kind of light bulb will not last as long as 3000 hours. In symbols, we write: H0: 𝜇 = 3000 H1 or Ha: 𝜇 ≠ 3000
  • 18. When the alternative hypothesis utilizes the ≠ symbol, the test is said to be non- directional. A non-directional test is also called a two-tailed test. Non-directional (two-tailed) The probability is found on both tails of the distribution.
  • 19. Directional (one-tailed, left-tailed) The probability is found at the left tail of the distribution. Directional (one-tailed, right- tailed) The probability is found at the right tail of the distribution.
  • 20. Example 4: The owner of a factory that sells a particular bottled water claims that the average capacity of a bottle of their product is 200 ml. Is the claim true? Solution: In words, the hypotheses are: H0 : The bottled water contains 200ml per bottle. H1 or Ha: The bottled water does not contain 250 ml per bottle. In symbols, the hypotheses are: H0 : 𝜇 = 50 H1 or Ha : 𝜇 ≠ 50
  • 21. Example 5. A rice farmer believes that using organic fertilizer on his plants will yield greater income. His average income from the past was Php200,000 per year. State the hypothesis in symbols. Solution: In words, the hypotheses are: H0: The rice farmer yields an income of Php200,000. Ha: The rice farmer yields an income greater than Php200,000. In symbols, the hypotheses are: H0: 𝜇=200,000 or Ha: 𝜇 >200,000
  • 22. Table 1. Four Possible Outcomes in Decision-Making
  • 23. Example 6: Understanding Errors A. Maria insists that she is 30 years old when, in fact, she is 35 years old. What error is Maria committing? Ans: Maria is rejecting the truth. She is committing a Type I error.
  • 24. Example 6: Understanding Errors B. A man plans to go hunting the Philippine monkey-eating eagle believing that it is a proof of his mettle. What type of error is this? Ans : Hunting the Philippine monkey-eating eagle is prohibited. Thus, it is not a good sport. It is a Type II error.
  • 25. In decisions that we make, we form conclusions and these conclusions are the bases of our actions. The probability of committing a Type I error is denoted by the Greek letter 𝛼(alpha) while the probability of committing Type II error is denoted by 𝛽(beta). The following table shows the probability with which decisions occur Table 2. Types of Errors
  • 26. Table 3. Level of Significance Level of Significance (denoted as alpha or 𝛼) is a measure of the strength of the evidence that must be present in a sample before rejecting the null hypothesis and conclude that the effect is statistically significant. It is the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis when it is true. The commonly used level of significance are 1%, 5% and 10%. In table 3, it shows the confidence level for every level of significance that are commonly used in researches.
  • 27.  Under the normal curve, the rejection region refers to the region where the value of the test statistic lies for which we will reject the null hypothesis. This region is also called critical region. So, if your computed statistic is found in the rejection region, then you reject 𝐻0. If it is found outside the rejection region you accept 𝐻0. Graphically, we can show the decision errors under normal curve.
  • 28. In figure 4, it shows the line that separates the rejection region from the nonrejection region (1- 𝛼). This line passes through the confidence coefficients, which also called critical values. The critical values can be obtained from the critical values table of the test statistic. For example, for a 95% confidence level if the test statistic is a z and it is a non-directional test, it can be determined by having this equation 0.95 / 2 = 0.4750 (expressed up to four decimal places so that we can identify an area in the normal curve table as close as possible to this value).
  • 29. In the z-table, the area 0.4750 corresponds to z = 1.96 so the critical values for a non directional test or two-tailed are -1.96 and +1.96. This can be written as za/2 = ± 1.96. When the confidence level is 95% and the test statistic is a z and it is a directional test or one-tailed. The critical values can be determined by changing 95% to 0.9500 (expressed up to four decimal places so that we can identify an area in the normal curve table as close as possible to this value).
  • 30. In the z-table, there are two areas close to this value: 0.9495 that corresponds to z = 1.64 and 0.9505 that corresponds to z =1.65. Then we get the average of the zvalues. This results to 1.645. In practice, we use the z-values of -1.65 for left-tailed and +1.65 for right tailed