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Getting There: Building an Online Research Community<br />Nicholas Jakobsen and Ryan Wallace<br />
Getting Where?<br />Build an online research tool <br />Facilitate collaborative research<br />Single place to search the ...
Who’s Involved?<br />
Who’s Involved?<br />
Getting Started<br />Users don’t know what they want until they see it<br />Get something up and get people using it<br />
Getting Started<br />
Getting Users<br />Developing trust<br />Letting user do it their way, don’t try to teach them your way<br />
Getting Content<br />Addressing Concerns<br />Time Commitments<br />Demonstrating Support<br />Control of Data<br />
Getting Content<br />Showing Value<br />Enhancing data<br />Connecting with Communities<br />
Getting Feedback<br />Embedding Developers in the Museum<br />Working with busy people<br />Managing Expectations<br />
Where to now?<br />Enabling Public interface<br />Soon ready to add new partners<br />Official Opening in June<br />
www.rrnpilot.org<br />Thank You<br />
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MW2010: Building an online research community: The Reciprocal Research Network

Museums face many challenges when building on-line collaborative networks to engage diverse knowledge communities. In this paper we explore the emergence of one such system, the Reciprocal Research Network (RRN), launched in March of 2010. During development, the RRN team explored and tested methods to overcome challenges commonly faced by museums undertaking similar projects. Here we discuss how the RRN is affecting research, why it is having this effect, and what course the development process followed.

The RRN creates an on-line research community, allowing geographically dispersed users to collaborate while studying cultural objects held in institutions around the world. Museums and other cultural institutions are contributing their data to the RRN in order to facilitate this research. Diverse user groups, including indigenous communities, share their own perspectives and knowledge with the people and institutions that make up the RRN community.

The Reciprocal Research Network was co-developed by three First Nations communities, the Musqueam Indian Band, the Stó:lō Nation/Tribal Council, and the U’mista Cultural Society, along with the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia. A dozen museums also participated in the development process.

Session: Multi-Institutional Collaboration: Process [organizations]

see http://www.archimuse.com/mw2010/abstracts/prg_335002329.html

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MW2010: Building an online research community: The Reciprocal Research Network

  1. 1. Getting There: Building an Online Research Community<br />Nicholas Jakobsen and Ryan Wallace<br />
  2. 2. Getting Where?<br />Build an online research tool <br />Facilitate collaborative research<br />Single place to search the Northwest Coast collections of multiple institutions<br />
  3. 3. Who’s Involved?<br />
  4. 4. Who’s Involved?<br />
  5. 5. Getting Started<br />Users don’t know what they want until they see it<br />Get something up and get people using it<br />
  6. 6. Getting Started<br />
  7. 7. Getting Users<br />Developing trust<br />Letting user do it their way, don’t try to teach them your way<br />
  8. 8. Getting Content<br />Addressing Concerns<br />Time Commitments<br />Demonstrating Support<br />Control of Data<br />
  9. 9. Getting Content<br />Showing Value<br />Enhancing data<br />Connecting with Communities<br />
  10. 10. Getting Feedback<br />Embedding Developers in the Museum<br />Working with busy people<br />Managing Expectations<br />
  11. 11. Where to now?<br />Enabling Public interface<br />Soon ready to add new partners<br />Official Opening in June<br />
  12. 12. www.rrnpilot.org<br />Thank You<br />

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  • OlgaLe

    Jan. 21, 2012

Museums face many challenges when building on-line collaborative networks to engage diverse knowledge communities. In this paper we explore the emergence of one such system, the Reciprocal Research Network (RRN), launched in March of 2010. During development, the RRN team explored and tested methods to overcome challenges commonly faced by museums undertaking similar projects. Here we discuss how the RRN is affecting research, why it is having this effect, and what course the development process followed. The RRN creates an on-line research community, allowing geographically dispersed users to collaborate while studying cultural objects held in institutions around the world. Museums and other cultural institutions are contributing their data to the RRN in order to facilitate this research. Diverse user groups, including indigenous communities, share their own perspectives and knowledge with the people and institutions that make up the RRN community. The Reciprocal Research Network was co-developed by three First Nations communities, the Musqueam Indian Band, the Stó:lō Nation/Tribal Council, and the U’mista Cultural Society, along with the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia. A dozen museums also participated in the development process. Session: Multi-Institutional Collaboration: Process [organizations] see http://www.archimuse.com/mw2010/abstracts/prg_335002329.html

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