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Tuesday, May 12, 2015
Radford University
Innovative Library
Classroom Conference
With many thanks
to the individuals, organizations, and institutions that made today possible
	
  
	
  
	
  
McConnell Lib...
The Innovative Library Classroom
May 12, 2015
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
   1	
  
Schedule at a Glance
	
   	
  ...
The Innovative Library Classroom
May 12, 2015
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
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Lightning Talks - 3:15 p.m. – ...
The Innovative Library Classroom
May 12, 2015
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
   3	
  
Conversation Starters
	
  
A f...
The Innovative Library Classroom
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A framework tasting: Tryi...
The Innovative Library Classroom
May 12, 2015
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
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“Remember that one time? ...
The Innovative Library Classroom
May 12, 2015
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
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Keynote
	
  
Keynote: Carrie D...
The Innovative Library Classroom
May 12, 2015
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
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A collaborative vision: P...
The Innovative Library Classroom
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Getting carded: Threshold...
The Innovative Library Classroom
May 12, 2015
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
   9	
  
Draw me in: Introducing the li...
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The Innovative Library Classroom 2015 Preliminary Program

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The Innovative Library Classroom takes place on May 12, 2015 at Radford University, Radford, VA.

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The Innovative Library Classroom 2015 Preliminary Program

  1. 1.             Tuesday, May 12, 2015 Radford University Innovative Library Classroom Conference
  2. 2. With many thanks to the individuals, organizations, and institutions that made today possible       McConnell Library at Radford University Wyndham Robertson Library at Hollins University Virginia Tech University Libraries The Innovative Library Conference 2015 Steering Committee: Candice Benjes-Small, Radford University (co-chair) Jennifer Resor-Whicker, Radford University (co-chair) Rebecca K. Miller, Virginia Tech (co-chair) Alyssa Archer, Radford University Katelyn Tucker, Radford University Craig Arthur, Radford University Lauren Pressley, Virginia Tech Kiri Goldbeck DeBose, Virginia Tech Julia Feerrar, Virginia Tech Rebecca Seipp, Hollins University
  3. 3. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 1   Schedule at a Glance     Timeslot Young 302 Young 305 Young 311 9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Opening  Remarks 9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Keynote: Carrie Donovan, Indiana University Shake up the sediment: Re-energizing pedagogical practice while avoiding bottle shock X X 10:10 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Brian Mathews, Scott Fralin, and Lauren Pressley, Virginia Tech Making knowledge together: Interactive course exhibits as project-based learning Alexander J. Carroll and Nedelina Tchangalova, University of Maryland- College Park, and Eileen G. Harrington, The Universities at Shady Grove Uncorking learning: Flipping library instruction PechaKucha-style Ginny Pannabecker, Virginia Tech Conversation Starter: A framework tasting: Trying out an upcoming vintage in info lit 11:10 a.m. – 12:00 noon Emily Cooke and Elizabeth Anne Teaf, Washington & Lee University A collaborative vision: Partnering with STEM faculty to teach visual literacy through multimedia research presentations Craig Arthur, Radford University Can you kick it? Bringing Hip Hop pedagogy to the library classroom Lisa Vassady, Radford University Conversation Starter: A fine wine: A different vintage - great LibGuides 2.0 & instruction pairings 12:00 – 1:10 p.m. Lunch 1:10 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Meagan Christensen and Todd Burks, University of Virginia Getting carded: Threshold concepts in the one-shot sessions Jenny Dale and Lynda Kellam, University of North Carolina-Greensboro Emotionally intelligent library instruction, or: How we learned to stop worrying and love our feels Jennifer Resor-Whicker and Katelyn Tucker, Radford University Conversation Starter: How we do it, how you do it: Creating online instruction videos 2:10 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Annie Zeidman-Karpinski and Dominique Turnbow, Univesrity of California-San Diego How I learned to love evaluation and not care so much about assessment Jessica Daly and Barbara Potts, Liberty University Key to connection Cara Evanson, James Sponsel, and Sara Swanson, Davidson College Conversation Starter: Crafting student creators: Incorporating tangible projects in the one-shot 3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Lightning talks (Listed on next page) X X
  4. 4. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 2   Lightning Talks - 3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Young 302 Champagne information literacy workshops on a beer budget Kelsey Corlett-Rivera, Alexander J. Carroll, and Linda Merci, University of Maryland New wine in old bottles: “Films without celluloid” and making the most of the spaces you’ve got Andy Horbal, University of Maryland “Remember that one time? At that place? With the thing? With those people?” Teaching citations as explanation Maria Fesz, Coastal Carolina Community College Zen in the library classroom: Applying Japanese aesthetics to transform teaching and learning Michael Courtney, Indiana University Draw me in: Introducing the library with markers! Erin Wilburn, Corning Community College
  5. 5. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 3   Conversation Starters   A fine wine: A different vintage - great LibGuides 2.0 & instruction pairings Lisa Vassady | Radford University   The popularity of Springshare’s LibGuides CMS has ensured that the release of the new 2.0 platform and the subsequent migration option have been making waves in libraries around the world. The related discussions have primarily focused on the nitty-gritty of the migratory process, options available on the new platform, and coding fixes. Instruction librarians may find that the new platform may also bring some unexpected post-migration surprises that may call for a significant overhaul of their approach to LibGuides. This conversation session strives to start a discussion on the different ways LibGuides are utilized in instruction sessions, challenges that may occur when attempting to pair “old” instruction techniques with the new platform, and sharing ideas to meet these challenges. The presenter will start the conversation off by showcasing the new features of the LibGuides 2.0 platform.   Crafting student creators: Incorporating tangible projects in the one-shot   Cara Evanson, James Sponsel, and Sara Swanson | Davidson College   In recent years, especially with the emergence of digital studies, there has been an increasing emphasis on students as creators, and not just consumers, of information. Educators have begun to think about how students’ relationship to the content they create plays an integral role in their learning. Moreover, recent drafts of the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education have stressed the importance of students as content creators. By participating in the creation of knowledge, students can begin to understand their place in the information landscape. How do you encourage students to actively engage in this aspect of information literacy if you only have the one-shot? This discussion will report our experiences on how we have incorporated student-created products into our one-shot lesson plans, and cover strategies for educating students as creators. During this session you will have the chance to contribute ideas as well as design your own activity centered on students as creators.   How we do it, how you do it: Creating online instruction videos Jennifer Resor-Whicker and Katelyn Tucker | Radford University   In response to shifting demands and trends, librarians are moving more instruction online than ever before. This conversation starter will discuss why and how librarians at McConnell Library use Prezi, in combination with other software, to develop dynamic online modules that meet changing needs of our users. Participants will also have the opportunity to discuss their own experiences with online instruction videos with peer librarians. We will explore what software programs participants use when creating online instruction videos, what has worked, and what has not worked. Participants will also have the opportunity to share best practices and examples of their favorite online instruction videos. This discussion will help facilitate a conversation about online videos and will give participants perspectives they can take away to their own libraries.        
  6. 6. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 4     A framework tasting: Trying out an upcoming vintage in info lit   Ginny Pannabecker | Virginia Tech   Join your colleagues for a Conversation Starter and explore ways to apply the proposed ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in course support. The proposed framework moves away from prescriptive, task-specific itemization towards a conceptual approach anchored by 6 threshold concepts: Authority is Constructed and Contextual, Information Creation as a Process, Information Has Value, Research as Inquiry, Scholarship Is a Conversation, and Searching Is Strategic. A key element of this framework is its emphasis on implementing assignments and instructional techniques that use these threshold concepts to promote students’ critical self-reflection and self-directed exploration and engagement with the information ecosystem. This session will include small and large group discussion and a kinetic brainstorming activity where you can *literally* toss ideas around! Lightning  Talks     Champagne information literacy workshops on a beer budget Kelsey Corlett-Rivera, Alexander Carroll and Linda Merci |University of Maryland     The University of Maryland Libraries offer drop-in information literacy workshops, which historically have been poorly attended. Previous efforts to increase attendance have focused on marketing, but a lack of time and funding for large-scale advertising hampered those efforts. One creative approach was a partnership between the UMD Libraries and the Graduate School Writing Center to offer Research and Writing Bootcamps, to leverage their respective audiences. Based on those experiences and the needs students expressed during research and writing consultations, this collaboration expanded to include a workshop on researching and writing literature reviews. Despite not launching a formal marketing campaign for that workshop, or conducting a lengthy needs assessment, twenty-four hours after opening registration, we had 165 students registered for two workshops in a 35 seat instruction room. This talk will suggest affordable ways to identify high priority topics to develop information literacy workshops that teach what students want to learn.   New wine in old bottles: “Films without celluloid” and making the most of the spaces you’ve got Andy Horbal    | University of Maryland     Because of shortages of film stock, in the 1920s students at the world’s first film school, the Vsesoyuznyi Gosudarstvenyi Institut Kinematografii in the Soviet Union, were taught to make “films without celluloid”: they wrote “shots” down on pieces of paper and then “edited” them into completed films. At the University of Maryland’s Library Media Services Department we have adopted this technique as a solution to a different problem: our spaces—“group viewing rooms” and classrooms geared towards film screenings—were designed with media *consumption* in mind. Rather than let this hold us back from promoting media literacy on our campus by beginning to offer instruction in multimedia *production*, we’ve embraced group work and the “film without celluloid” as ways to teach core storyboarding and film editing despite limited computer resources while we await funding to complete a renovation.    
  7. 7. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 5     “Remember that one time? At that place?With the thing? With those people?” Teaching citations as explanations   Maria Fesz  | Coastal Carolina Community College   This short discussion will expand upon the basic idea of citations as a means for students to guide readers to their sources. The presenter will describe her experiences teaching students at the community college level by using everyday scenarios, backwards citation instruction, and the idea that citations have more function than just causing students aggravation. Students begin to look at citations as a part of their entire paper as opposed to an unrelated afterthought. The main goal is to alleviate formatting panic and confusion when approached with the wide array of source types available in today's research environment.   Zen in the library classroom: Applying Japanese aesthetics to transform teaching and learning Michael Courtney | Indiana University Structure and flow may seem like contradictory elements for instructional design, yet their cooperative nature is surprisingly vital to engaging the learner. The structure is based on an intentional interrelationship of the parts, while the flow creates a visceral space that allows for a student’s instinctual navigation through the learning process. Structural flow, then, leads the learner naturally through information, creating a positive and fluid experience. In nature, as well as with a learner’s ability to process information about the world around them, structure often performs the functions of flow. Applying a Japanese aesthetic approach to the library classroom, then, can serve to link the way learners develop both critical and creative thinking processes. This talk will briefly explore the interplay of the aesthetic principles wabi (transient impermanence), sabi (withered beauty), and yūgen (mysterious profundity) and how they can be used to transform teaching and learning in the library classroom.   Draw me in: Introducing the library with markers! Erin Wilburn |Corning Community College   At Corning Community College, our FYEX classes are focused on fostering student success and engagement, for those who test into remedial math and writing classes. Historically, the library introduction in these classes was done in a tour/scavenger hunt/worksheet style. It was not connected to any larger project or research assignment. In the fall of 2014, the library closed for renovations, so the tour was out! Librarians started visiting classes, looking for a way to engage students with library services and think “outside the box.” Upon reflection, the librarians realized that they were marketing the library and its services, not simply leading a group of students around the building and clicking on various links on our webpage. With this in mind, one librarian set out to redesign the information session, incorporating active learning principles. The result was an activity that could be done in just about any classroom, with no technology, and could work as an ice breaker in many intro-level courses.
  8. 8. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 6   Keynote   Keynote: Carrie Donovan Shake up the sediment: Re-energizing pedagogical practice while avoiding bottle shock Carrie Donovan | Indiana University   Carrie Donovan is Head of Teaching & Learning for the Indiana University Libraries, where she works with students, faculty, and instructors to connect the Libraries to student learning. Carrie’s contribution to information literacy and learning assessment is made evident through her publications and presentations on the topic, as well as her engagement in professional organizations. She currently serves as a facilitator and curriculum designer for ACRL’s Assessment in Action initiative. At IU, Carrie advocates for information literacy assessment across the curriculum to ensure the libraries’ centrality to disciplinary discourse and student learning. Carrie’s own research areas of interest include the review and reward of librarians’ teaching, student-centered learning for library instruction, and critical information literacy. Carrie received her Master of Library Science degree from Indiana University. Presentations Uncorking learning: Flipping library instruction PechaKucha-style Alexander J. Carroll and Nedelina Tchangalova | University of Maryland, College Park   Creating a buzz for information literacy among faculty and students is a challenge for many librarians, particularly given the prevalence of one-shot library sessions. Could flipping the information literacy session using a learning management system improve learning outcomes, while engaging students more fully with information literacy concepts? Working with undergraduate students in the health sciences, we assigned student groups different online modules prior to class and had them present what they learned to the class in a Japanese presentation style, known as PechaKucha. We compared these sessions with a more traditional instructor-led session. In this PechaKucha-style presentation, participants will learn about efficient and effective approaches for flipping the classroom and assessing student learning in this type of information literacy session.   Making knowledge together: Interactive course exhibits as project-based learning   Brian Mathews, Scott Fralin, and Lauren Pressley | Virginia Tech   Learning happens everyday on our campuses, but most of the time it is confined in the boundaries of the classroom. We aimed to blur those disciplinary barriers by inviting students to co-create interactive exhibits in the library. This assignment challenged them to think carefully and creatively about course content and different ways to package it for a public audience.   This form of project-based learning requires students to blend together digital and physical elements in the creation of knowledge artifacts. These assignments invite an opportunity to engage students across a spectrum of literacies, fluencies, and skill building possibilities. They also encourage deeper interaction and partnership with faculty and other instructors. Furthermore, these exhibits help advance our aspiration of becoming an intellectual and cultural node on our campus.
  9. 9. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 7     A collaborative vision: Partnering with STEM faculty to teach visual literacy through multimedia research presentations Emily Cook and Elizabeth Anne Teaf | Washington & Lee   “A Collaborative Vision” discusses an assignment based partnership between Washington & Lee University (W&L) Library and W&L STEM faculty.     The presentation outlines a case study involving visual literacy instruction. In this study, a control group of students received the University Library’s traditional visual literacy training (one in-class, assignment-based session approximately 20 minutes long) in preparation for a traditional poster session. An experimental group received additional training in visual literacy (two 60 minute in-class sessions with hands-on instruction) in preparation for an interactive digital poster session. Both training sessions included ACRL’s Visual Literacy Competency Standards while the extended visual literacy training also introduced students to the threshold concepts outlined in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy. The presentation will include an assignment overview, poster grading rubrics created in collaboration with a STEM faculty member, and a literature review of visual literacy needs in STEM disciplines. Can you kick it? Bringing Hip Hop pedagogy to the library classroom Craig Arthur | Radford University     Have you ever thought about keeping it trill? In this presentation, I will discuss the power of using Hip Hop pedagogy to encourage students to embrace the scholarly research process. This new approach presents several unique opportunities. Many of our students are engrossed in Hip Hop, one of the few areas of popular culture that routinely is concerned with issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, and authenticity. The long-standing, traditional practice of creating a Hip Hop song is strikingly similar to the academic research process. Music sampling perfectly addresses issues of authorship, academic integrity, copyright, and plagiarism with our students. During this session, we will reframe Hip Hop musicians as metaliterate, primary source aficionados. You might leave the session with a new active learning exercise for your instruction backpack, too.   Emotionally intelligent library instruction, or: How we learned to stop worrying and love our feels Jenny Dale and Lynda Kellam | University of North Carolina-Greensboro     Emotional intelligence - briefly defined as the ability to recognize feelings and emotions in others and in yourself – has been a hot topic in leadership and management since the 1990s. Originally a topic of interest primarily in the business world, other fields have joined the conversation and adapted the concept of emotional intelligence to meet their needs. Recently, the education literature has begun to explore emotional intelligence in relation to teaching, though the topic is typically approached from an educational leadership perspective. In this interactive session, we will describe the competencies associated with emotional intelligence and apply those competencies to the practice of information literacy instruction. The presenters will describe strategies and activities and provide suggestions for effectively connecting the concept of emotional intelligence with our work as teaching librarians. Participants will leave this session with tangible goals for more intentionally integrating emotional intelligence into their teaching practice.    
  10. 10. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 8     Getting carded: Threshold concepts in the one-shot sessions Meagan Christensen and Todd Burks | University of Virginia   Underage thinkers want to participate fully as information-literate adults. How can we welcome them into the world of research and effectively show them how to build responsibly on what they already know?     We’ve developed a customizable “Source Deck” of cards that illustrates how information is created and quickly facilitates meaningful engagement with a wide variety of resources. This low-tech, hands-on activity has transformed our teaching and energized our students. Session participants will see the tool in action, learn how to create three easily executable lesson plans, and will be given the resources needed to create their own Source Decks.   Key to connection Jessica Daly and Barbara Potts | Liberty University   This session will give detailed instruction on how libraries can connect and serve student groups within their residential student population. Our library made a connection with our university's Academic Affairs for Student Athletics department and have witnessed amazing relationships and things happen right before our very eyes. Instead of a true liaison area we are calling this a "Student Engagement" outreach area where the focus is on the services and resources of the library which can be utilized no matter your major or field of study. This concept can be used with any non-traditional academic area within a college or university campus in order to connect students to the library. We currently serve over 550 NCAA student athletes through the Jerry Falwell Library and only began this relationship in August of this year. Not only is the NCAA nightly study hall now being held within the library but we also use our conference room to teach information literacy classes to student athletes as well as their 35 tutors. We feel that our experience is one that will inspire other libraries and librarians to reach out beyond their traditional relationships and find new and innovative ways to bring students into the library.   How I learned to love evaluation and not care so much about assessment AnnieZeidman-Karpinski and Dominique Turnbow | University of California-San Diego     As an instruction librarian you are likely asked or want to know how effective your workshops are in order to show your value to the education process. In this presentation, we use an instructional design approach to show that there is a clear taxonomy of evaluation and assessment that can guide our practices. Given the unique challenges we face as librarians conducting one-shot instruction, our model suggests that we rightfully should be directing our attention to evaluation and learning. While there are many assessments that librarians and library programs can do, we shouldn’t be trying to do all of them. In this presentation we will provide specific examples evaluations and assessments to use in workshops and discuss how to focus them to answer specific questions about learner satisfaction and what the participants learned. These examples can be used in both online and face to face learning environments.
  11. 11. The Innovative Library Classroom May 12, 2015                 9   Draw me in: Introducing the library with markers! Erin Wilburn | Corning Community College   At Corning Community College, our FYEX classes are focused on fostering student success and engagement, for those who test into remedial math and writing classes. Historically, the library introduction in these classes was done in a tour/scavenger hunt/worksheet style. It was not connected to any larger project or research assignment. In the fall of 2014, the library closed for renovations, so the tour was out! Librarians started visiting classes, looking for a way to engage students with library services and think “outside the box.” Upon reflection, the librarians realized that they were marketing the library and its services, not simply leading a group of students around the building and clicking on various links on our webpage. With this in mind, one librarian set out to redesign the information session, incorporating active learning principles. The result was an activity that could be done in just about any classroom, with no technology, and could work as an ice breaker in many intro-level courses.  

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